Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. SCROLL DOWN FOR LIVE COVERAGE
  2. The Scottish government's controversial Lobbying Bill came under scrutiny, with witnesses including Labour MSP Neil Findlay and the SCVO's John Downie
  3. MSPs quizzed ministers on a variety of issues including delayed discharge, fertility services and the recruitment of additional specialist nurses, during general questions
  4. Nicola Sturgeon was quizzed on her record on policing, following the HMIC report on the M9 crash
  5. MSPs catch up on the running of the parliament, as the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body fields questions from the chamber
  6. The future delivery of social security in Scotland is the theme of the final debate of the week

Live Reporting

By Craig Hutchison and Carol Duncan

All times stated are UK

  1. Good night and have a nice weekend

    That ends BBC Scotland's Holyrood Live coverage of the Scottish Parliament on 12 November 2015.

    Holyrood at night

    Have a good night and a lovely weekend.

  2. MSPs unanimously back the motion from the debate on social security

    MSPs unanimously back the motion from the debate on social security.

    Scottish Parliament
  3. Witnesses voices have been heard

    Ms Adamson concludes by stressing the importance of the fiscal framework in delivering a new social security system.

    She praises the witnesses who bravely came to give evidence to the Welfare Reform Committee and today's debate shows their voices have been heard.

  4. No social security post-code lottery in terms of delivery

    Welfare Reform Deputy convener Clare Adamson says there is no consensus about how the Work Programme should be delivered.

    Ms Adamson says it is important that Scotland does not end up with a post-code form of social security delivery.

  5. Clawback clarity

    Claire Adamson, deputy convener of the Welfare Reform Committee, says a new Scottish system of delivering social security is a chance to improve the wrongs of the existing mechanism.

    Claire Adamson

    Ms Adamson says many people are concerned that clarity is needed over the issue of clawback as the power of sanctions remains with the Department of Work and Pensions.

  6. Fiscal framework is unfair to Scotland

    The housing and welfare minister says the Scottish government will not accept a fiscal framework that is unfair to Scotland.

  7. Scottish Welfare Fund

    Ms Burgess says the Scottish government has taken strong action to mitigate the worst of the UK government's welfare refomr.

    The minister points to the Scottish Welfare Fund and the mitigation of the bedroom tax.

  8. Putting people at the heart of social security will go some way to rebuilding trust

    Ms Burgess says any delivery of social security must be cost effective, "the money has to go into the pockets of people who need it".

    She says the Scottish government is looking at how to make the system fairer.

    The housing and welfare minister says the social security system must be made accessible and it must listen to its customers.

    The SNP MSP says everyone agrees that putting people at the heart of social security will go some way to rebuilding trust.

  9. Minister closing

    Welfare Minister Margaret Burgess says there is agreement that any new Scottish system to deliver social security must be person-centred with dignity and respect at its heart.

    Housing and Welfare Minister Margaret Burgess
    Image caption: Housing and Welfare Minister Margaret Burgess

    The minister says that despite the opportunities there are challenges when partial benefits are devolved from Westminster.

    She says that she is disappointed that Labour has agreed with the Conservatives in the decision not to devolve tax credits.

  10. Mr Rowley says DWP sanctions are "barbaric"

    Mr Rowley says DWP sanctions are "barbaric".

    People must be treated with "respect and dignity", says the Labour MSP.

  11. Labour closing

    Closing for Scottish Labour Alex Rowley says local authorities have an important role to play in the delivery of the work programme.

    Labour MSP Alex Rowley
    Image caption: Labour MSP Alex Rowley

    Eligibility criteria, he says, tends to tighten as local government budgets are scrutinised meaning people may find themselves falling outwith the catchment for the benefit.

    Mr Rowley says that a co-ordinated approach is needed to work with the third sector organisations who are well placed to help deliver benefits where needed.

    This, he says, should form part of Scotland's anti-poverty strategy.

  12. Consensus on structure desirable

    Ms Goldie says there will be a challenging period of transition where it will be necessary to cooperate closely with the DWP.

    The former Scottish Conservative leader says the delivering and devolving provision of social security to the local level, where possible, is preferable.

    She says the Scotland Bill gives very wide powers to Holyrood.

    The Tory MSP says some caution must be exercised and consensus on structure must be put in place before political changes are made.

  13. Conservatives closing

    Closing for the Scottish Conservatives Annabel Goldie says there is an "exciting but formidable challenge" in how we plan and deliver benefits under the new powers coming to Scotland.

    Scottish Conservative MSP Annabel Goldie
    Image caption: Scottish Conservative MSP Annabel Goldie

    She says dignity, respect, having a person centred system, a passported and simple system are key principles in creating a new Scottish security system.

    The Tory MSP says responsibility and accountability at a governmental level also calls for a delicate balance between efficient and effective delivery mechanisms.

  14. Delivery tensions

    SNP MSP Joan McAlpine says that where responsibility lies for the delivery of benefits is an ongoing discussion between the Scottish government and local authorities.

    Joan McAlpine

    These tensions will also be seen when disability benefit is administered in Scotland.

    As sanctions remain reserved, there could be further tensions between the UK and Scottish governments.

  15. Background: Social security devolution

    The Scotland Bill, as introduced, would in effect, devolve the Work Programme (which is aimed at those at risk of long term unemployment) and Work Choice (for disabled people).

    The Work Programme is delivered in Scotland by Ingeus and Working Links

    Although the Work Programme will be devolved, the sanctions regime remains reserved.

    Claimants who fail to attend a mandatory programme have deductions made to their benefits. Around 110,000 sanction referrals were made in Scotland in 2014.

    The Smith Commission

    The Scottish government argues that the Smith Commission provided for more than this, while Scottish Secretary David Mundell insists the Smith Commission will be delivered in full.

    The Smith Agreement stated:

    "The Scottish Parliament will have all powers over support for unemployed people through the employment programmes currently contracted by DWP (which are presently delivered mainly, but not exclusively, through the Work Programme and Work Choice) on expiry of the current commercial arrangements" (Smith Commission 2014).

  16. Stigma can be reversed and trust can be restored

    Labour MSP Margaret McDougall says in Scotland the stigma around social security can be reversed and trust can be restored.

    Margaret McDougall

    Ms McDougall says Scottish Labour will replace tax credit cuts with top up payments.

  17. Background: HMRC cuts

    HMRC, the government's tax collection agency, has announced a UK-wide restructuring which could see 2,000 jobs lost in Scotland.

    HM Revenue and Customs sign

    More than 8,000 people are currently employed at the agency's 18 Scottish offices, includes major centres in Dundee, Cumbernauld and East Kilbride.

    HMRC said it was relocating to more modern, cost-effective premises and would seek to minimise redundancies.

    The PCS union has said the agency's plans will be "absolutely devastating" for staff and for the service HMRC provides.

  18. 'Utterly soul destroying'

    SNP MSP Mark McDonald says his son receives disability living allowance and his wife carer's allowance.

    SNP MSP Mark Macdonald
    Image caption: SNP MSP Mark Macdonald

    The application and reapplication for these benefits is "utterly soul destroying" , an emotional burden for any family to go through as they have to list, on page after page, the things his child cannot do.

    Clawback of benefits and how it is assessed is something that merits further discussion, says Mr MacDonald.

    He is concerned that the job losses at HMRC will affect the organisation's ability to undertake those assessments.

    There are questions around how the fiscal framework will ensure that Scotland can deliver the new powers.

  19. Labour MSP welcomes the devolution of social security powers

    Labour MSP Malcolm Chisholm says he welcomes the devolution of £2.5bn worth social security powers and benefits.

    Malcolm Chisholm

    Mr Chisholm says there is some disappointment that the restriction in relation to Disability Allowance was not removed.

  20. 'Pig in a poke'

    SNP MSP Kevin Stewart says as we do not know what the fiscal framework will look like we "may be getting a pig in a poke".

  21. 'Respect agenda'

    SNP MSP Kevin Stewart says the respect agenda must be followed in everything the Scottish Parliament does on social security.

    Mr Stewart says all aspects of conditionality should have beend devolved too, particularly the sanctions regime.

    Kevin Stewart

    He says reserved and devolved rules could ultimately cause confusion and the UK government's decision making "defies logic".

  22. Familiarity needed

    Mr Johnstone says any new system must be easy to use and understand but also predictable and familiar.

    The welfare reform programme, being driven by the south, is the foundation for the benefits system. He welcomes the flexibility that the Scottish government will have around administration and delivery.

  23. 'Huge opportunity to get the language right'

    Scottish Conservative Alex Johnstone says this is a huge opportunity to get the language right around social security.

    Mr Johstone says the great challenge around social security is "there is not a great deal of time on his side".

    Alex Johnstone

    He says many of the lessons on how these powers will be delivered come from the experience of Holyrood.

    The Tory MSP says the introduction of the Scottish Welfare Fund taught us that there is the opportunity for different local authorities to deliver differently.

  24. Local support

    Mr Rowley says 30% of men and 25% of women, in their 20s, earn less than the living wage.

    He welcomes more employers signing up to the living wage scheme, to pay all employees more than the minimum wage.

    People who are removed from a working environment need a joined up approach using local level support and organisations to help deliver any new policies to them.

  25. 'People must be treated with respect'

    Mr Rowley says an astonishing two thirds of children in poverty live in a family where a parents work.

    The Labour MSP says that is why the joined up policies created support people in work as well as out of work.

    The deputy leader of Scottish Labour says people must be treated with respect at the same time they are supported.

    Mr Rowley says the full details of the fiscal framework are not yet known and they must be known before a social security system is put in place.

    He says there needs to be more transparency around the talks on the fiscal framework between the Scottish and UK governments.

  26. Anti-poverty strategy

    Scottish Labour MSP Alex Rowley says it is unusual for a debate to be held, without a report, but to ask for views on the delivery of social security in Scotland in future.

    Alex Rowley

    The new powers that are coming to Holyrood under the Scotland Bill should, he says, be combined with existing policies to put people first: "We need to have an anti-poverty strategy in Scotland".

  27. Social security not welfare

    Welfare Minister Margaret Burgess says she prefers the term social security to welfare and says she may be the last minister to have welfare in her title.

  28. Scotland Bill now contains power to create new benefits

    The minister says it is clear the Work Programme is not working for those in need.

    Ms Burgess says the government is pleased that discussions between the UK government and Scottish government are bearing fruit.

    The Scotland Bill now contains a measure to allow Scotland to create new benefits, she says.

  29. 'It is vital the social security system is accessible'

    Ms Burgess says it is vital the social security system is accessible.

    Glasgow protest - pic by Laura Bicker

    She says the government wants to take a fairer approach, particularly on the issue of disabled children.

    The Welfare and Housing Minister says there is an opportunity to create a social security service more suited to the needs of Scotland.

    She says the "hated and pernicious bedroom tax will be abolished".

  30. 'Valuable exercise'

    Ms Burgess says the recent update paper was a valuable exercise in hearing from people who will be affected.

    She says the new personal independence payment could be difficult for the most vulnerable people to cope with.

    The government has been working with stakeholders to look at how assessments can be more beneficial for people who need and rely on benefits.

  31. Scottish government's "ambition is to develop a distinctly Scottish approach"

    Welfare Minister Margaret Burgess says the Scottish government will always use the power it has to protect and benefit the people of Scotland.

    Ms Burgess says there must be a full and independent review of the sanctions regime.

    Margaret Burgess

    She says the Scottish government's "ambition is to develop a distinctly Scottish approach".

    Ms Burgess says the new social security system must be a "person-centred approach" treating people with "dignity and respect".

  32. Housing benefit paid direct to landlords is welcome

    Mr Henry says the paying of housing benefit to landlords is welcome.

    The Labour MSP says Scotland will have the ability to top up devolved benefits.

    He says delivery is going to be the key issue.

  33. Other considerations

    Mr Henry says people with disabilities have said felt that they were being treated as part of a box-ticking exercise by the work programme.

    He says that this is a consideration to be taken into account with any replacement for the work programme.

    The cost of funerals, cold weather payments and winter weather payments, the administration of universal credit incorporating seven universal payments, housing benefit and top-up benefits all have to be considered.

  34. Eligibility criteria

    Mr Henry says there are huge challenges there, not least eligibility criteria.

    The Labour MSP asks if the definition of carers should be changed to reflect how much they contribute.

    He says the Work Programme and Work Choice are very contentious, as the committee heard that many people feel let down by these programmes.

    Job Centre Plus

    Mr Henry says there are decisions to be made if these are replaced by a national scheme or a number of regional schemes.

  35. 'Dignity and respect'

    Mr Henry says there is a burning desire to have "dignity and respect" at the heart of any social security system, putting people first instead of treating them like a number.

    The claims system must also be simplified, using plain language that people can understand.

    Mr Henry says there is a huge demand for passporting as well.

  36. Call for consensus

    Mr Henry says the committee is looking for ideas as to how the powers in the Scotland Bill should best be used.

    The Labour MSP calls for consensus if that is at all possible.

    He says he hopes certain fundamental principles will be agreed apon.

    Mr Henry says he wants the social security system to be consistent.

  37. Setting up a new social security for Scotland one of the biggest challenges

    Welfare Reform Committee convener Hugh Henry says the parliament will have to set up a new system of social security and welfare, one of the biggest challenges Holyrood has faced.

    Hugh Henry
  38. Social security debate

    The Welfare Reform Committee leads a debate on the future delivery of social security in Scotland.

  39. Staff support

    John Pentland says flu vaccinations and additional support is available for people with health issues exacerbated by wintry weather.

    Flexible working is available for those who cannot travel to work due to transport disruption.

  40. Winter weather

    Green MSP Patrick Harvie asks the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body what action it takes to address staff welfare issues related to winter weather.

    Holyrood in the snow
  41. Broadband access

    Independent MSP John Wilson asks the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body what action it is taking to improve the speed of server access from members' regional offices.

  42. Pupils from deprived areas visiting parliament

    Labour MSP Jenny Marra asks the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body how it ensures that pupils from deprived areas have equal access to visiting the Parliament.

    Ms Marra says Holyrood should be accessible to all children.

    Labour MSP Jenny Marra
    Image caption: Labour MSP Jenny Marra

    Scottish Conservative MSP Liz Smith says the SPCB is not in the position to fund travel for pupils to the parliament.

  43. Portfolio investment

    John Pentland says the fund trustees would have to a segregated fund portfolio investment.

  44. Parliamentary pension investments

    Labour MSP Richard Lyle asks the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body what its position is on the Scottish Parliamentary Pension Scheme investing a reported £2.1 million in fossil fuels while the Parliament is trying to move toward renewables.

  45. Ms Urquhart criticises the painting Service by artist David Rowland

    SNP MSP and SPCB member Linda Fabiani says emphasis has been made on acquiring works from artists whose reputation have already made their reputation.

    Ms Urquhart criticises the painting Service by artist David Rowland saying it is offensive.

    Independent MSP Jean Urquhart
    Image caption: Independent MSP Jean Urquhart

    She calls on the SPCB to consult with Scotland's art experts in the future. Service by artist David Rowland.

    Ms Fabiani says the painting was a gift from the army.

  46. Displaying artwork

    Independent MSP Jean Urquhart asks the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body what criteria it uses when selecting or accepting artwork for display.

  47. SPCB has strong relations with trade uions

    Labour MSP and SPCB John Pentland says the body is aware of the Trade Union Bill.

    John Pentland

    Mr Pentland says the SPCB has strong relations with trade unions.

    Ms Ferguson says she would have hoped that the corporate body would make sure that trade unions are treated as partners.

    Mr Pentland says it would be inappropriate for the SPCB to take a position on the bill.

  48. Trade Union Bill

    Labour MSP Patricia Ferguson asks the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body what consideration it has given to the implications for its employees of the proposals in the UK Government's Trade Union Bill.

  49. Pension funds

    Mr Finnie asks if it is time for the Scottish Parliament to take control over its own affairs and not hide behind pension fund managers in relation to unethical investments.

    Liz Smith

    SPCB member Liz Smith says it is the sole responsibility of the fund trustees.

  50. Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body questions

    Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body questions begins.

    Independent MSP John Finnie asks the Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body how it promotes the Parliament, its values and its work.

  51. No Clooney lunch for us

    That concludes this session in the chamber and we will be back after lunch, sadly not with George Clooney, with coverage of SPCB questions and the debate on the future of social security in Scotland.

    George Clooney is having lunch with staff of the Social Bite
    Image caption: George Clooney is having lunch with staff of the Social Bite

    Actor George Clooney has been visiting a social enterprise cafe which helps the homeless in Edinburgh.

    Fans surrounded the Social Bite Cafe in Edinburgh which also has outlets in Glasgow and Aberdeen.

    Delighted staff said they had received a thousand dollar donation from the actor/director during his visit.

  52. Investing in publications

    Mr Wheelhouse says the government is investing in a number of publications including the Violence in the Work Place Guide and a guide detailing measures to protect retail workers.

  53. Family and friends of workers affected

    Mr Wheelhouse says the impact of any violent or threatening incident is also felt by the family and friends of the workers affected.

  54. The justice system is 'sending a strong message' against worker abuse

    Community Safety Minister Paul Wheelhouse praises Carla Hilton for brining this important debate to the chamber.

    Mr Wheelhouse praises Usdaw's Free from Fear campaign.

    He says the frontline of retail can be particularly tough, particularly around this time of year.

    Paul Wheelhouse

    The community safety minister says prosecutors take a robust approach to prosecuting people who have attacked workers.

    He says the justice system is sending out a strong message that abuse of workers will not be tolerated.

  55. Record Scottish figures

    Scottish Labour MSP Patricia Ferguson says the scale of the problem in Scotland can only be understood once figures for the crime are recorded.

    Patricia Ferguson

    Ms Ferguson urges the minister to do everything possible to ensure that this becomes a reality.

  56. Call for a single piece of legislation

    Scottish Conservative MSP Murdo Fraser agrees everyone should be able to work with fear of assault or abuse.

    Mr Fraser says one single piece of legislation must protect all workers as a two tier structure that only protects emergency workers is not good enough.

    Murdo Fraser

    He says the logic of singling out some workers is not sound.

    The Tory MSP says the coming of Black Friday highlights this issue.

  57. Raise awareness

    SNP MSP Roderick Campbell says workers need reassurance that they can carry out their work free from fear.

    SNP MSP Rod Campbell
    Image caption: SNP MSP Rod Campbell

    Black Friday, he says, brings out the worst in some people with reports of scuffles among shoppers where shop workers may be expected to intervene.

    Raising awareness among employers of their duty to ensure employee safety is essential says Mr Campbell.

  58. Usdaw campaign is 'fantastic'

    Labour MSP Hugh Henry says this is an easy debate as who in their right mind could oppose respect for workers.

    Mr Henry says workers are looking for more than just warm words and the Usdaw campaign is "fantastic".

    Hugh Henry

    He says that is not enough, politicians must act.

    Mr Henry asks why the Scottish government do not extend the protection and support that doctors, police, nurses and fire fighters have to shop workers.

  59. Unreported crime

    A recent survey by Usdaw on work related crime show that in the past 12 months: one in two shop workers have been verbally abused, 8% experience this every week, 9% are victims of physical violence.

    Despite these figures, two thirds say they have not reported these incidents.

    No one should work in fear of violence and threatening behaviour says Ms Hilton.

  60. 'Freedom from Fear campaign'

    The Labour MSP says Usdaw's Freedom from Fear campaign seeks to prevent violence, threats and abuse against shopworkers.

    Usdaw website
    Image caption: Usdaw website

    Ms Hilton is concerned that every day more than 300 shopworkers are assaulted for simply doing their jobs, with more than 55,000 incidents of verbal threats and physical abuse recorded in the last year alone. She says this situation is unacceptable and that people who provide a service to the public deserve to be able to go about their jobs without fear of abuse and violence.

    The Labour MSP says Usdaw's asked both the Scottish and UK governments to ensure that all public-facing workers have better protection from violence, abuse and threats for simply doing their job and she wishes Respect for Shopworkers Week 2015 every success.

  61. Workers' rights week

    Ms Hilton says the annual Usdaw Respect for Shopworkers Week will be held from 9 to 13 November 2015.

    It is, she says, a reminder for workers to remain calm and for shop owners to improve safety around their premises.

  62. 42 sleeps until Christmas

    Ms Hilton says there are just 42 sleeps until Christmas Day, according to her children.

    The Labour MSP says shop workers do not deserve chaos and abuse.

  63. Protecting workers from violence

    Labour MSP Cara Hilton is leading a debate on how best to protect workers from violence and abuse.

    Cara Hilton
  64. That concludes our coverage of first minister's questions.

    That concludes our coverage of first minister's questions.

  65. BACKGROUND: New Trade Union Bill

    SNP MSP Gordon Macdonald asks what the effect will be of the proposed Trade Union Bill on the Scottish government's commitment to fair work.

    A union member wearing an arm band on a picket line

    If passed, the Bill would tighten rules on trade union ballots, requiring a minimum 50% turnout in strike ballots with public sector strikes also requiring the backing of at least 40% of those eligible to vote.

    Under current rules, strikes can be called if the majority of those taking part in a ballot vote in favour.

    The Scottish government and Scottish Labour are to demand a vote to exclude Scotland from efforts to amend the rights of trade unions across the UK.

  66. Call for Holyrood to reject Trade Union Bill

    Ms Sturgeon says the Scottish Parliament must be allowed to reject the Trade Union Bill via a legislative consent motion, if Scotland is not excluded from the legislation.

  67. 'Draconian' Trade Union Bill

    The first minister said on Tuesday the parliament was clear in its opposition to what is a "draconian" piece of legislation in the Trade Union Bill.

    Ms Sturgeon says the government has asked for Scotland to be exempted from the bill.

  68. Trade Union Bill

    SNP MSP Gordon MacDonald asks how the proposed Trade Union Bill could affect the Scottish government's commitment to fair work.

  69. Independent review team

    Ms Sturgeon says not all of the independent review team can begin until January.

    Mr Findlay sarcastically says he is sure the government had not kicked the review into the long grass until after the election.

  70. BACKGROUND: Children's ward at St John's Hospital

    A report on the future of the children's ward at St John's Hospital in Livingston will not be published until after May's Holyrood election.

    St John's hospital

    The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health has been asked to carry out a review of the acute paediatric health service across Lothian.

    It followed the children's ward at St John's, which treats about 3,000 children every year, closing to in-patients over the summer because of staffing problems.

    The report is expected to focus on whether the ward should close or be downgraded.

  71. Lothian paediatric report

    Scottish Labour MSP Neil Findlay asks why the publication of a review into paediatric services in Lothian has been delayed.

  72. Apprenticeships and gender gap

    Conservative MSP Cameron Buchanan asks about the fall in women in apprenticeships.

    Ms Sturgeon says the government is working to increasing the number of women going into modern apprenticeships.

  73. Sturgeon: 'Complete and utter disgrace'

    Ms Sturgeon says it is a "complete and utter disgrace we do not have equal pay in this country".

    The first minister says ministers have repeatedly made it clear delays in settling equal pay claims by local authorities are unacceptable.

  74. BACKGROUND: Gender pay gap

    Prime Minister David Cameron has set out plans to make large firms disclose data on the gender pay gap among staff.

    Men and women's legs
    Image caption: A significant pay gap opens up between men and women who are over 40

    The measures are contained in the Equality Act 2010, which was introduced by Labour but blocked from implementation by the Conservatives until now.

    Firms with more than 250 employees are required to make public the average pay and bonuses paid to male and female workers.

    Public and private sector firms, and voluntary sector organisations will be subject to the legislation.

  75. Equal Pay Act

    SNP MSP Linda Fabiani asks what action the Scottish government will take to fully implement the Equal Pay Act 1970.

  76. Full fiscal autonomy

    Conservative MSP Murdo Fraser asks about the impact of the SNP policy of full fiscal autonomy had the amendment been passed.

    Ms Sturgeon says Scotland should have the full control over economic powers.

  77. Call to drop austerity politics

    Ms Sturgeon says the cuts to public services and welfare are hitting the most vulnerable.

    The first minster calls on George Osborne to drop austerity politics.

  78. BACKGROUND: UK departmental cuts

    Pound coins and notes
    Image caption: Mr Osborne wants to bring the budget into surplus by 2019-2020

    Chancellor George Osborne announced, on Monday, that the Treasury and the environment, local government and transport departments have agreed the measure which is designed to reduce the country's deficit.

    The chancellor had asked most government departments to implement savings of 25% to 40% by the end of the current parliament.

    Defence, health and overseas aid have been ringfenced. Negotiations are ongoing over other departments including education, justice and the Home Office.

  79. UK budget cuts

    SNP MSP Kenneth Gibson asks how the Scottish government's finances will be affected by four UK government departments agreeing to a 30% cut in their budgets over the next four years.

  80. Logan Air

    Lib Dem MSP Liam McArthur raises the issue of Logan Air's lifeline services to the islands and the concerns surrounding that.

    Ms Sturgeon says the transport minister is talking to Logan Air and demanding the issues are resolved

  81. 'Cannot blame Westminster for police service'

    Ruth Davidson

    Ms Davidson says Ms Sturgeon's overall budget this year went up by £661m and the sum for policing went down by £6m.

    She says the first minister cannot blame Westminster and must accept responsibility.

    Ms Sturgeon says the first person to mention Westminster was Kezia Dugdale rather than her.

    The first minister says both Labour and the Conservatives had pledged to create a single police force.

    Ms Sturgeon says the overall budget has been cut by 10%

  82. Staffing levels in Police Scotland

    Scottish Conservative Ruth Davidson says the report criticised staffing levels but the justice secretary blamed the cut on Westminster.

    Ms Davidson asks about the budget and the reduction in the budget of the police.

    Ms Sturgeon says VAT is having to be paid by Police Scotland, whereas other forces in the UK do not have to pay.

  83. Crime at an 'all time low'

    Nicola Sturgeon

    Ms Sturgeon says crime in Scotland is at a 41-year low and Ms Dugdale failed to mention that.

  84. Police record 'worst' for years

    Ms Dugdale says her record on the police is the worst in years.

    The first minister says it is the verdict of the Scottish people that counts.

  85. Record to be judged

    Ms Sturgeon says she is more than happy to allow the Scottish people to judge her record.

    Perhaps that is why 58% of people intend to vote for the SNP next year, she adds.

  86. Sturgeon: 'I accept report'

    Ms Dugdale says there are systemic failures in the police service.

    Ms Sturgeon says she accepts all 30 recommendations in the report.

  87. BACKGROUND: M9 crash

    Weaknesses in Police Scotland's roll-out of its new national call-handling system have been highlighted in an Inspector of Constabulary report.

    Police call handler

    Derek Penman said the oversight of the project was inadequate and made 30 recommendations.

    Justice Secretary Michael Matheson said the report included some "hard messages" for the force and pledged the recommendations would be implemented.

    The report followed the M9 crash in which Lamara Bell and John Yuill died.

  88. Issues will be addressed

    Tamara Bell and quote from her son's father

    Ms Sturgeon pays her condolence to the families of both Lamara Bel and John Yuill who died in the crash.

    The first minister says any issues required to be addressed will be addressed and the public can have faith in the police service.

  89. Damning indictment

    Kezia Dugdale

    Ms Dugdale says the report is a "damning" indictment of the government's record on policing.

  90. 'Highest standard'

    Ms Dugdale raises the Inspector of Constabulary report on the M9 crash which highlighted a number of weaknesses.

    The first minister says the government will continue to make sure the services being provided to the public are of the highest standard

  91. Pauline Cafferkey

    Pauline Cafferkey
    Image caption: Nurse Pauline Cafferkey is now out of hospital isolation

    Ms Dugdale says everyone must be relieved to hear that the nurse Pauline Cafferkey is better.

    Nicola Sturgeon agrees and expresses concern about HMRC plans to shed jobs.

  92. And we're off

    First minister's questions gets under way with Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale questions.

  93. Nurse recruitment

    Labour MSP Malcolm Chisholm asks the Scottish government what progress it is making with the recruitment of additional specialist nurses.

  94. School reform

    Labour MSP Iain Gray asks the Scottish government how it will respond to the Commission for School Reform's challenge paper.

  95. Energy industry

    Labour MSP Richard Baker asks the Scottish government what action it is taking to support the energy industry in the north east.

  96. Minister says NHS boards have robust plans for the winter.

    Health Secretary Shona Robison says the Scottish government supports a number of initiatives to protect vulnerable people over the winter.

    Shona Robison

    Ms Robison says NHS boards have robust plans for the winter.

  97. Winter plans

    SNP MSP James Dornan asks the Scottish government what winter preparedness programmes it has put in place to protect vulnerable people.

  98. Fertility services

    Scottish Labour MSP Mary Fee asks what action it is taking to improve fertility services in West Scotland.

  99. Glasgow's infrastructure and investment

    Labour MSP Johann Lamont asks when the infrastructure, investment and cities secretary last met Glasgow City Council and what issues were discussed.

  100. Scottish government committed to addressing the gender imbalance in STEM subjects

    Learning Minister Alasdair Allan says the Scottish government is committed to addressing the gender imbalance in STEM subjects like computing.

    Alasdair Allan
  101. Computer science graduates

    SNP MSP Willie Coffey asks how many people have graduated in computer science from Scottish universities this year, broken down by gender.

  102. Changes down to Glasgow City Council - minister

    Fair Work Secretary Roseanna Cunningham applauds City Building and Blindcraft.

    Roseanna Cunningham

    Ms Cunningham says it is for Glasgow City Council to make any changes to City Building.

  103. Glasgow's city building

    SNP MSP Bill Kidd asks what the Scottish government's position is on the impact on employment in Glasgow of the city council's plans for its City Building subsidiary.

  104. General questions next

    Here's a list of the general questions we expect to be asked today:

    1. SNP MSP Bill Kidd asks what the Scottish government's position is on the impact on employment in Glasgow of the city council's plans for its City Building subsidiary.
    2. SNP MSP Willie Coffey asks how many people have graduated in computer science from Scottish universities this year, broken down by gender.
    3. Labour MSP Johann Lamont asks when the infrastructure, investment and cities secretary last met Glasgow City Council and what issues were discussed.
    4. Conservative MSP Mary Fee asks what action it is taking to improve fertility services in West Scotland.
    5. SNP MSP James Dornan asks the Scottish government what winter preparedness programmes it has put in place to protect vulnerable people.
    6. Labour MSP Richard Baker asks the Scottish government what action it is taking to support the energy industry in the north east.
    7. Labour MSP Iain Gray asks the Scottish government how it will respond to the Commission for School Reform's challenge paper.
    8. Labour MSP Malcolm Chisholm asks the Scottish government what progress it is making with the recruitment of additional specialist nurses.
    9. Green MSP Patrick Harvie asks the Scottish government how much it plans to spend in 2016-17 on its national infrastructure priority on energy efficiency.
    10. SNP MSP Jim Eadie asks what recent discussions the Scottish government has had with the City of Edinburgh Council and NHS Lothian regarding delayed discharge from hospital.
  105. Coming up in the chamber.........FMQs

    We will bring you extensive coverage of FMQs from 12pm, including social media reaction.

    First Minister Nicola Sturgeon
    Image caption: First Minister Nicola Sturgeon

    First though MSPs will get the chance to quiz ministers during general questions.

  106. The Standards Committee draws to a close

    Mr Duncan says the most important thing is that there is a level playing field with everyone being treated equally.

    Standards Committee convener Stewart Stevenson draws the discussion to a close.

    Committee convener Stewart Stevenson
    Image caption: Committee convener Stewart Stevenson
  107. Who initiates a meeting?

    Conservative MSP Cameron Buchanan says the person who initiates the meeting is important.

    John Downie from the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations says he gets calls from MSPs and ministers.

    Mr Downie says the Scottish government has signed up to being more transparent.

    Peter Duncan from the Association of Professional Political Consultants in Scotland says who initiates a meeting is not important.

  108. Gordon Aikman praised as an unpaid lobbyist

    John Downie from the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations praises Gordon Aikman and his successful unpaid lobbying for MND Scotland and persuading Nicola Sturgeon to commit funds for more nurses.

    The NHS is now funding the specialist nurses who care for motor neurone disease (MND) patients in Scotland.

    Gordon Aikman has become an MND campaigner since being diagnosed with the terminal condition last year
    Image caption: Gordon Aikman has become an MND campaigner since being diagnosed with the terminal condition last year

    First Minister Nicola Sturgeon also pledged to double the number of specialist nurses, who are currently paid for through charity donations.

    She made the decision within weeks of meeting MND campaigner Gordon Aikman.

    Mr Aikman, 29, was diagnosed with the incurable condition last year, when he was working for Better Together.

  109. Public perception

    Willie Sullivan, from the Electoral Reform Society, and John Downie, of the CSVO, both say that much of the Lobbying (Scotland) Bill is concerned with public confidence in the parliamentary system.

  110. Split oversight

    Prof Raj Chari, of Trinity College Dublin, says that he does not understand why the oversight mechanism has two offices working towards, what is essentially, one aim.

    Prof Raj Chari

    The registrar who records, while the commissioner then investigates breaches.

    Prof Chari says these functions should not be divided between two offices.

  111. 'Not all lobbying is equal'

    Andy Myles from Scottish Environment Link says he is a lobbyist part of the time but he tries to "darken the doors of Holyrood as little as possible".

    Mr Myles says there are completely unpaid people who lobby successfully, as in achieving changes to the allotment law.

    Andy Myles from Scottish Environment Link
    Image caption: Andy Myles from Scottish Environment Link

    He says his fear is that there may be a narrowing down of who speaks to MSPs with only professionals from civic Scotland lobbying not "real people".

    "Not all lobbying is equal."

  112. The omission of phone calls and written communications is 'quite striking'

    Professor Raj Chari from Trinity College Dublin says there are some good things about the bill.

    The professor, who is an expert on lobbying, says compared to the UK legislation the Scottish bill includes in-house lobbyists.

    Professor Raj Chari from Trinity College Dublin
    Image caption: Professor Raj Chari from Trinity College Dublin

    The academic says that it does not include telephone calls and written communications is quite striking and he has never seen it before.

    It pains him to say the even the UK legislation included these forms of communications.

  113. 'It is frankly ludicrous' to leave out modern communications from the bill

    Dr William Dinan from Spinwatch echoes concerns that senior advisers and civil servants are excluded which "just doesn't make sense".

    Dr William Dinan from Spinwatch
    Image caption: Dr William Dinan from Spinwatch

    Dr Dinan says "it is frankly ludicrous" to leave out modern communications from the bill.

    He says: "The public might be dismayed by this".

  114. 'The bill as drafted does seem to strike a decent balance'

    Richard Maughan from the CBI says lobbying is an essential part of the political process and it must be done in an open and transparent way.

    Mr Maughan says: "The bill as drafted does seem to strike a decent balance."

    Richard Maughan from the CBI
    Image caption: Richard Maughan from the CBI

    He says the proposals do impose costs in dealing with the register and there is an opportunity costs as well.

    Mr Maughan calls for clarity over any criminal sanctions.

  115. 'The confusion caused by the UK government appeared to be intentional'

    Steve Goodrich from Transparency International UK says the pace the UK government pushed the Lobbying Bill through at Westminster was unfortunate.

    Mr Goodrich says the confusion caused by the UK government appeared to be intentional.

  116. Legislation 'does strike the right balance'

    Mr Downie says the SCVO can cope with the proposals in the Scottish Lobbying Bill.

    John Downie

    He says some of the SCVO members want a stronger bill, some are opposed to that.

    Mr Downie says he does not want the burden of the register to fall on smaller organisations.

    He says he thinks the bill does strike the right balance, although modern communications should be included.

  117. 'Real war on charities by the UK governemnt'

    John Downie from the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations says it is concerned about the "real war on charities by the UK government".

    UK charities are running scared of campaigning at all, he says.

    This may be linked to the UK government's welfare cuts and the UK Lobbbying Bill has caused a lot of concern.

    Mr Downie says the burden of transparency should be on those who are being lobbied, MSPs, civil servants and special advisers.

  118. Including MSPs is welcome

    Steve Goodrich from Transparency International UK says it is welcome the bill includes MSPs as this is not the case at Westminster where MPs are not included.

    Steve Goodrich from Transparency International UK
    Image caption: Steve Goodrich from Transparency International UK

    Mr Goodrich says civil servants and special advisers should be included as should modern communications.

  119. The Lobbying Bill will 'not survive in its present form'

    Committee convener Stewart Stevenson says he does not think the bill will survive in its present form, particularly in relation to modern communication.

  120. The bill does not recognise the telephone and computer have been invented

    Mr Findlay says the bill does not recognise that the telephone and computer have been invented.

    He says he fears another shoal of red herrings are being released around how onerous a register will be.

    Labour MSP Neil Findlay
    Image caption: Labour MSP Neil Findlay

    The Labour MSP says it is not simple enough just to say the voluntary sector is there to do good and they should be included in the bill.

  121. Lobbying Bill is 'a bit of a travesty'

    Labour MSP Neil Findlay says lobbying is a very important part of the democratic process.

    Mr Findlay says there is no evidence of wrong doing but this is a

    He says as more powers come to Holyrood more lobbying will come.

    "I actually think the bill is a bit of a travesty from what I put forward."

  122. Lobbying Bill 'does not give enough transparency'

    Willie Sullivan from the Electoral Reform Society Scotland says political malaise is a big problem at the moment.

    Mr Sullivan says there is a real problem of trust in politics.

    Willie Sullivan from the Electoral Reform Society Scotland
    Image caption: Willie Sullivan from the Electoral Reform Society Scotland

    The public feel the influence of big powerful organisations outweigh the voters creating democratic and political inequality.

    Mr Sullivan says transparency is vital and this bill does not give enough transparency.

    He says e-mails and other forms of electronic communication should be included in the bill.

  123. The Lobbying Bill is a 'decent and balanced starting point'

    Peter Duncan from the Association of Professional Political Consultants in Scotland says: "Around this table we are probably all lobbyists."

    Mr Duncan says this legislation does strike a balance.

    Peter Duncan from the Association of Professional Political Consultants in Scotland
    Image caption: Peter Duncan from the Association of Professional Political Consultants in Scotland

    "This is a decent and balanced starting point."

  124. Lobbying Bill might be 'onerous'

    Mr Myles says this legislation might be onerous for civic organisations and charities.

    He describes the complexity and extent of who is a lobbyist, including all staff in a charity and volunteers.

    "My fear is that the complication and the complexity of the registration process" may have the same effect as the Westminster bill which has negatively impacted on organisations and made people shy away from lobbying, says Mr Myles

  125. 'Blind spots in this bill'

    Andy Myles from Scottish Environment Link says as a former special adviser to government ministers he has been lobbyist and been lobbied and is not sure if he is a gamekeeper or a poacher.

    Mr Myles says there are "blind spots in this bill".

    Andy Myles Scottish Environment Link

    He says it will often be civil servants or special advisers that are lobbied, not ministers or MSPs.

  126. And we're off

    Standards Committee convener Stewart Stevenson gets us underway and introduces the witnesses.

  127. Background: SCVO

    The Sunday Herald has reported a split has opened up in the umbrella group which represents Scottish charities over the new lobbying legislation.

    The Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations (SCVO) has previously described transparency campaigners as "London-centric conspiracy theorists".

    The SCVO's Director of Public Affairs, John Downie, who speaks for 1,500 members, claimed that lobbying is "a completely different ball game" in Scotland.

    He said he would support Scottish Government proposals for a bill which forces lobbyists to be listed "so long as any register is light touch".

    The Lobbying Bill
    Image caption: The Lobbying Bill

    But a new coalition of organisations calling for stricter regulations includes several groups which are paid up members of the SCVO.

    A source at one charity, who asked not to be named, said: "SCVO's view isn't necessarily shared by every member as the voluntary sector encompasses a very broad range of organisations."

    The Scottish Government's Lobbying Bill was published last week.

    A coalition of groups is expected to submit four demands which include a call for the legislation to demand that all contacts between lobbyists, politicians and their staff are recorded, as well as the cost of the campaign to influence public policy.

    Among the confirmed coalition members are Alcohol Focus Scotland and Electoral Reform Society Scotland - both members of the SCVO.

  128. Background: Lobbying Bill

    In February the Standards Committee recommended that the names of major political lobbyists in Scotland should be made public to improve transparency.

    It said an online register would include a list of organisations which spend large amounts of cash employing people to influence MSPs.

    In 2013, the Scottish government announced plans to legislate on lobbying, but no bill was not published until last Friday.

    The committee also recommended the register should cover "significant" lobbying activity, which would also take in organisations which have sustained contact with politicians.

  129. The Standards, Procedures and Public Appointments Committtee

    The Scottish government's Lobbying Bill will come under the scrutiny of the Standards, Procedures and Public Appointments Committee shortly.

    MSPs will take evidence from Professor Raj Chari from Trinity College Dublin; Dr William Dinan, from Spinwatch and ALTER EU; John Downie from the Scottish Council for Voluntary Organisations andPeter Duncan from the Association of Professional Political Consultants in Scotland.

    Labour MSP Neil Findlay, whose member's bill on lobbying was taken over by the Scottish government, will join Steve Goodrich from Transparency International UK; Richard Maughan from the CBI; Andy Myles from Scottish Environment Link and from Willie Sullivan from the Electoral Reform Society Scotland.

  130. MSPs will shortly take evidence on the controversial Lobbying Bill

    Coming up today.............................

    MSPS will shortly take evidence on the controversial Scottish government Lobbying Bill will come under the scrutiny of the Standards, Procedures and Public Appointments Committee.

    MSPs will take evidence from a range of organisations and most tellingly from Labour MSP Neil Findlay whose proposed bill was taken over by the government.

    SCVO's John Downie has come out in favour of the government while some organisations that fall under his umbrella have not, like the Electoral Reform Society who will also give evidence.

    Nicola Sturgeon will face questions from opposition party leaders from 12pm
    Image caption: Nicola Sturgeon will face questions from opposition party leaders from 12pm

    General questions will be followed by first minister's questions and we'll bring you extensive coverage including social media reaction.

    Then Labour MSP Cara Hilton will lead a debate on how best to protect workers from violence and abuse.

    In the afternoon session after Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body Questions, MSPs will debate the future delivery of social security in Scotland.

  131. Good morning and welcome to Holyrood Live

    Holyrood

    Good morning and welcome to BBC Scotland's Holyrood Live coverage of the Scottish Parliament on 12 November 2015.