Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Live Reporting

Alun Jones and Sara Down-Roberts

All times stated are UK

  1. Hwyl fawr

    That brings the plenary to a close.

    Senedd Live returns on Tuesday. Take care.

  2. 'Supporting those who support us'

    The topic chosen for the Short Debate by Jayne Bryant (Newport West) is "Supporting those who support us: the mental wellbeing of our NHS and social care workforce".

    She praises the book Behind the Mask, in which ITU consultant Dr Ami Jones describes COVID-19 at Nevill Hall General Hospital in Abergavenny with photographs by Operating Department Practitioner Glenn Dene.

    View more on youtube
  3. 'Necessary measures taken to protect lives and to prevent the spread of the SARS-COV-2 virus'

    The motion by the Independent Alliance for Reform Group is deleted and replaced by the Welsh Government amendment.

    There were 25 for, eight abstentions and nine against.

    So the Senedd:

    1. Recognises that the necessary measures taken to protect lives and to prevent the spread of the SARS-COV-2 virus have had a profound impact on our economy, society and communities.

    2. Notes the actions being taken by the Welsh Government to continue to support the Welsh economy and its commitment to ensuring that our young people do not lose out educationally or economically through the effects of the pandemic.

    3. Notes the Welsh Government’s commitment to end the lockdown as soon as it is safe to do so.

    4. Notes our package of business support is the most generous in the UK and more than £1.67bn of Welsh Government financial assistance has reached businesses since the beginning of April 2020.

    SARS-COV-2 virus
  4. No mention of Senedd alcohol row

    There has been no mention in this debate on coronavirus restrictions, or today's plenary, of the row about politicians seen drinking during a pub alcohol ban.

    Welsh Tory leader Paul Davies, Darren Millar and Labour's Alun Davies have apologised for drinking in the Welsh Parliament days after the ban came into force. They deny breaking rules.

    A fourth Senedd Member Nick Ramsay has denied being a part of the gathering.

    Senedd authorities are investigating.

    Senedd authorities say they are seeking to "establish an accurate account of what took place"
    Image caption: Senedd authorities say they are seeking to "establish an accurate account of what took place"
  5. 'Commitment to end the lockdown as soon as it is safe to do so'

    The Welsh Government amendment, moved by health minister Vaughan Gething, seeks to delete all the IAR motion and replace with a proposal that the Senedd:

    1. Recognises that the necessary measures taken to protect lives and to prevent the spread of the SARS-COV-2 virus have had a profound impact on our economy, society and communities.

    2. Notes the actions being taken by the Welsh Government to continue to support the Welsh economy and its commitment to ensuring that our young people do not lose out educationally or economically through the effects of the pandemic.

    3. Notes the Welsh Government’s commitment to end the lockdown as soon as it is safe to do so.

    4. Notes our package of business support is the most generous in the UK and more than £1.67bn of Welsh Government financial assistance has reached businesses since the beginning of April 2020.

  6. 'Most effective COVID-19 strategy to take in Wales is a united, UK response'

    Mark Reckless (South Wales East) from the Abolish the Welsh Assembly Party says it is a matter of regret "that the Welsh Government continues to take a different COVID-19 strategy from the UK Government", and says he believes "that the most effective COVID-19 strategy to take in Wales is a united, UK response, led by the UK Government."

  7. 'UK Government's action to protect lives and livelihoods in Wales'

    The Conservatives' amendment, tabled in the name of Darren Millar (Clwyd West)- one of the MSs who drank alcohol on Welsh Parliament premises during a pub alcohol ban - seeks to delete all the IAR motion and replace with a proposal that the Senedd:

    1. Recognises the impact of COVID-19 on public services and business in Wales.

    2. Welcomes the UK Government's action to protect lives and livelihoods in Wales and to support the public sector response to the pandemic, including:

    a) £5.2 billion in financial support for the Welsh Government;

    b) the coronavirus job retention scheme;

    c) the self-employed income support scheme;

    d) the coronavirus business interruption loans scheme;

    e) the bounce-back loans scheme;

    f) UK procurement of vaccines and PPE; and

    g) deployment of the armed forces.

    3. Calls on the Welsh Government to:

    a) allocate remaining unused resources received from the UK Government to support Welsh businesses;

    b) end the first-come-first-served basis distribution of Welsh Government support for businesses and focus resources at those in greatest need;

    c) guarantee that business support is immediately available when restrictions are introduced; and

    d) develop a comprehensive plan to bounce back from the pandemic with innovative infrastructure projects and a welcoming environment for businesses in Wales.

  8. 'Guarantee that the current lockdown is the last'

    The topic chosen by the Independent Alliance for Reform Group for their debate is "future measures to prevent and tackle the spread of Covid-19".

    The proposal, moved by David Rowlands, is that the Senedd:

    1. Recognises the harms caused by measures taken to prevent the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

    2. Believes that coronavirus mitigation measures have resulted in damage to the Welsh economy and have negatively impacted the life chances of younger generations.

    3. Calls upon the Welsh Government to guarantee that the current lockdown is the last, by ensuring that:

    a) Wales has an adequate test, trace and isolate regime and provides facilities to allow individuals to totally isolate themselves from all face-to-face contact.

    b) NHS Wales has a greater number of critical care beds, with ICU beds per capita closer to that of Germany or the US, both of which have seen fewer deaths per capita than Wales.

    4. Further calls upon the Welsh Government to end the postcode lottery of business support, ensuring that all Welsh businesses forced to close as a result of the Welsh Government’s action plan are adequately compensated.

    Independent Alliance for Reform Group
    Image caption: Independent Alliance for Reform Group
  9. Three committee recommendations rejected

    The Welsh Government has rejected three of the committee's recommendations, including that "at the next opportunity a Ministerial role is created with clear and defined responsibilities for children and young people and which has a stated role of holding the Cabinet to account to deliver the provisions of the Rights of Children and Young Persons (Wales) Measure 2011."

    It is rejected, with Julie Morgan stating "as Deputy Minister for Health and Social Services I have specific responsibilities in relation to children and young people and their rights, however as a government we are agreed that children’s rights are everyone’s responsibility.

    "This means that the concerns of children and young people continue to be at the forefront of the Cabinet’s collective thinking and policy making."

    The response by the Welsh Government can be seen in full here.

  10. 'Children’s rights are not driving the Welsh Government’s decision-making'

    We move on to a debate on the Children, Young People and Education Committee report: Children’s rights in Wales.

    Committee chair Lynne Neagle (Torfaen) presents the report.

    She says:

    "Our inquiry on children’s rights has led us to conclude that there is still progress to be made. We heard clear frustrations from stakeholders about the pace at which the Measure has influenced policy and spending.

    "There is a lack of reference to children’s rights in key strategic documents, and insufficient evidence that the duties in the Measure are being considered and exercised across the whole of the Welsh Government.

    "Some of the tools put in place to support the implementation of this legislation, such as Child Rights Impact Assessments, are produced far too late in the policy development process. This demonstrates to us that children’s rights are not driving the Welsh Government’s decision-making as the legislation intended."

    kids
  11. 'I have a lot of sympathy'

    Eluned Morgan cites a series of rows over changes to names over the years, including a dispute where the Grade I-listed Plas Glynllifon near Caernarfon was referred to as Wynnborn mansion in online marketing material.

    She says "I have a lot of sympathy with this issue but right now people have the right to name their houses".

    She says Ceredigion council has received ten requests to change a household name from English to Welsh and only one from Welsh to English recently.

    She adds that she is going to see "what could be done statutorily".

    A Ceredigion farm promotes its accommodation under a different name
    Image caption: A Ceredigion farm promotes its accommodation under a different name
  12. 'Virtually nothing’s been done about it'

    This petition led to a Twitter exchange between BBC journalist Huw Edwards and Rhondda MP Chris Bryant.

    Huw Edwards responded to the petition by saying “it’s been going on for years — with some really gruesome and offensive examples — and virtually nothing’s been done about it”.

    Labour Rhondda MP Chris Bryant responded to Huw Edwards’ comments on Twitter, saying that: “I’m really not sure why the BBC thinks it’s ok for its senior journalists regularly to opine like this.”

    Huw Edwards responded: “Oh Chris. I’m a Welsh speaker standing up for my cultural heritage. We live in an age when minority cultures are meant to be respected. I’m genuinely sorry that offends you.”

    See the story in full here.

    Huw Edwards
    Image caption: Huw Edwards
  13. Historical place names bill was rejected in 2017

    Dai Lloyd MS speaks of his disappointment that his bid to protect historical place names in planning law failed after Senedd members voted against it in 2017.

    Welsh ministers had refused to support Mr Lloyd's attempt to introduce a bill that would protect the names of houses and farms, fields, natural features and landscapes.

    Mr Lloyd said there had been strong support for his proposed bill from external organisations.

    Mr Lloyd's bill would have deployed a range of measures to protect names, including establishing a system where people who want to change a historic name must seek consent to do so, and a general prohibition on changing a historical place name.

  14. 'Little by little, the country is losing its heritage'

    This petition was submitted by Robin Aled Davies, stating: "There is a pattern throughout Wales where new owners are changing their house names into English.

    "There is no need to go far to find the evidence! Little by little, the country is losing its heritage.

    "This must be stopped for the sake of future generations, whatever their language."

    Robin Aled Davies
    Image caption: Robin Aled Davies
  15. 'Legislate to prevent people from changing Welsh house names'

    The next item is a debate on a petition - "legislate to prevent people from changing Welsh house names" which received 18,103 signatures.

    Petitions Committee chair Janet Finch-Saunders (Aberconwy) proposes that the Senedd "notes the petition".

    One property in Trearddur Bay in Anglesey was renamed Llan Tropez
    Image caption: One property in Trearddur Bay in Anglesey was renamed Llan Tropez
  16. Welsh Government is 'not meeting its targets for training Welsh-medium teachers'

    In response to a question from Conservative Suzy Davies, the Minister for Health, Mental Well-being and the Welsh Language Eluned Morgan says that the Welsh Government is not meeting its targets for training Welsh-medium teachers.

    She says the situation is worst in secondary schools despite a £5,000 incentive to attract teacher training students.

    She adds she is happy to receive ideas.

    Cymraeg
  17. 'Anxiety levels appear to be higher during the pandemic'

    Labour's Jack Sargeant says the estimate that one in four people will be affected by mental or neurological disorders at some point in their lives "vastly underplays reality".

    He asks how can the Welsh Government "reach out better".

    Minister for Mental Health, Wellbeing and Welsh Language Eluned Morgan points to continued funding for Time to Change Wales as an example.

    The minister also says that a number of surveys are being carried out on mental health and that anxiety levels generally appear to be higher during the pandemic - due to personal health, the health of relatives and financial problems.

    mental health
  18. 'Retract' comment about 'vaccinators standing around with nothing to do'

    Abolish the Welsh Assembly Party MS Mark Reckless says the first minister should retract his comment on BBC Radio 4's Today programme, referring to the Pfizer vaccine, that "There will be no point and certainly it will be logistically very damaging to try to use all of that in the first week and then to have all our vaccinators standing around with nothing to do with for another month."

    Vaughan Gething replies that both the first minister and himself have clarified that no vaccines are being held back.

  19. 'NHS has shown flexibility and a can-do attitude'

    Plaid Cymru's Rhun ap Iorwerth asks whether the Welsh Government and the NHS in Wales have the capacity to change if the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI) changes its advice on the priority list for the coronavirus vaccine.

    Vaughan Gething describes the question as "hypothetical" but adds "we'll consider the developing evidence base... the NHS has shown flexibility and a can-do attitude".

    Rhun ap Iorwerth
  20. Will vaccine uptake be lower among minority ethnic groups?

    Conservative Andrew RT Davies refers to the warning by the UK government's scientific group for emergencies (SAGE) of a "significant risk" that vaccine uptake for COVID-19 will be lower among minority ethnic groups.

    Mr Gething admits it is a "real concern" and encourages everyone to have the vaccine.