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Summary

  1. The UK and the EU have agreed a "flexible extension" of Brexit until 31 October
  2. European Council President Donald Tusk has urged the UK to "not waste this time" and said the extension could be terminated if a withdrawal deal is agreed
  3. The PM said the UK would still aim to leave the EU as soon as possible
  4. She has been updating MPs on the extension in the Commons
  5. Talks between the government and Labour to try to find a way forward are continuing

Live Reporting

By Paul Seddon, Richard Morris, Harriet Agerholm and Katie Wright

All times stated are UK

  1. Will the PM hold a people's vote?

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chuka Umunna

    Independent Group MP Chuka Umunna says that the PM always puts her party before the country. He says that the chancellor has spoken in favour of a public vote on the final deal.

    Mrs May refers Mr Umunna to her previous answers on a second referendum.

  2. Another MP asks for further referendum

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Stephen Doughty becomes the latest MP this afternoon to ask Theresa May whether she will put her deal to a referendum.

    He warns that "decoupling" ratification of the deal from the issue of another referendum would be opposed by "many, many" Labour MPs.

    The prime minister repeats her insistence that she wants to "deliver" on the result of the 2016 referendum.

  3. Labour may 'string along' government

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Francois

    Conservative Mark Francois says "perseverance is a virtue, but sheer obstinacy is not". He says that the Labour Party may "string along" the government in negotiations.

    Mrs May says she will continue to argue for the Conservative party in government. "We're delivering for the people," she says.

  4. Tory MP quotes May's previous comments on extension

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Peter Bone

    Tory Brexiter Peter Bone quotes the PM in March, when she said she was "not prepared to delay Brexit any further than 30 June".

    He asks her how she will honour this commitment, given the extension agreed to last night.

    Theresa May replies that the UK can still leave before 30 June if Parliament votes to approve her Brexit withdrawal agreement before then.

  5. Does PM regret legitimising no-deal Brexit?

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Pat McFadden

    Labour's Pat McFadden asks if the prime minister regrets legitimising the idea of no deal with the British public.

    Mrs May says that no deal would be better than a bad deal, but "we have a good deal".

  6. Why doesn't Wales have seat at negotiating table?

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liz Saville Roberts

    Plaid Cymru's Westminster leader Liz Saville Roberts says that seven of the countries deciding the fate of the UK last night had populations smaller than Wales. She asks why Wales has not had a seat at the negotiating table.

    Mrs May says the government "work with the devolved administrations across the UK" to find "the right way forward".

  7. Tory MP: Put backstop plan out of its misery

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tory MP Andrew Murrison claims the leaders of Ireland and Germany have said there "will be no hard border" in Ireland, even in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

    He says this means the Irish border backstop plan should be "put out of its misery".

    In reply, Theresa May says the EU has been clear that the bloc's rules "must be applied at the border" if the UK left without a deal.

    Some of the comments on this issue have been taken out of context, she says.

  8. Which red lines can be 'rubbed out' in talks with Labour?

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Anna Soubry

    Former Conservative MP Anna Soubry says she welcomes this extension as it allows time for a people's vote, which she says "is the only way out of the uncertainty".

    She asks which red lines the prime minister is prepared to "rub out" in negotiations with Labour.

    Mrs May says that "both sides are exploring where that point of agreement may be".

  9. May quizzed on customs union

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Yvette Cooper asks whether the PM would consider adopting a common set of external tariffs with the EU.

    Theresa May replies that the government wants to keep the "benefits of a customs union" with the EU, whilst allowing the UK to have an independent trade policy.

    However she says: "I think there is actually more agreement in relation to a customs union than is often given credit for when different language is used".

  10. Will she seek the confidence of the Labour party?

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former Brexit minister Steve Baker says that the government remains in office because of the DUP (which props up its minority government) and asks if the prime minister will "seek the confidence of the Labour Party" if an agreement goes through.

    Mrs May says that trying to seek consensus across the House in the way her government currently is, is "probably unprecedented".

  11. Show more confidence, Tory MP tells May

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Baron

    Conservative John Baron asks the prime minister "to show more confidence" and asks for the UK to leave the EU on World Trade Organization terms, without a deal.

    Mrs May says that leaving without a deal is also about security, not just trade.

    She says leaving with a deal "in an orderly way is in the best interests of our country".

  12. EU has 'backed down' over no deal - Dodds

    EU statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nigel Dodds

    The DUP's Westminster leader Nigel Dodds says that the EU has "backed down" over the prospect of a no-deal, "she and the rest of the frontbench voted for changes to the withdrawal agreement" he says.

    He asks for the prime minister to "examine where she's going with all of this" and to come back with something "that can actually get a majority in this House".

    "We have consistently sought to change the withdrawal agreement," says Mrs May.

    She lists all the times she has been speaking to the EU over changes to the backstop and says that there is a legal commitment for the backstop to be changed by December 2020.

  13. Lib Dem leader calls for referendum timetable

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Vince Cable

    Lib Dem leader Sir Vince Cable asks the prime minister to put forward a timetable for when a second referendum could take place, in case MPs vote for it.

    Theresa May replies that the government's position on another vote hasn't changed.

    She repeats what she said earlier about the idea having already been rejected twice in the House of Commons.