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Summary

  1. MPs debated government efforts to roll over EU trade deals
  2. They debated Holocaust Memorial Day and treating ME in afternoon
  3. Prisons minister made statement on report about sexual offenders
  4. Andrea Leadsom announced future parliamentary timetable
  5. House of Lords debated threats from climate change

Live Reporting

By Sophie Morris and Robbie Hawkins

All times stated are UK

  1. That's it from the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And with that, the day in the Commons comes to an end.

    There was a distinct Brexit flavour to the start of the day, with questions to Brexit ministers and an urgent question about government attempts to roll over EU trade deals.

    The Brexit discussion also continued during the business statement, with a number of MPs asking procedural questions about next Tuesday's big Brexit votes in Parliament.

    After this, Prisons Minister Rory Stewart pledged to act on a report about the supervision of sex offenders in prison or on probation.

    The afternoon saw MPs call for greater education about the Holocaust, during a debate to mark this Sunday's Holocaust Memorial Day.

    A debate on treatment for people with ME saw a number of MPs call for more research into the condition and greater understanding of challenges faced by sufferers.

  2. Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The debate on climate change finishes - and the House of Lords finishes for the day.

  3. Government taking climate change 'extremely seriously'

    Debate on threats presented by climate change

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Henley

    Energy Minister Lord Henley says the entire country has played a part in reducing carbon emissions, and there seems to be a conscious effort among the younger generation to make a change.

    We are already seeing the impact of climate change both in the UK and globally, he says, noting that "we cannot say how devastating a rise in temperatures by 3 degrees could be".

    He says the government is investing £2.6bn before 2021 to reduce flood and coastal erosion risks, and is taking the challenge of climate change "extremely seriously".

    The government is serious about decarbonising the economy and "not being complacent", he adds, disagreeing with the view that the government has "chopped and changed" its climate change strategy.

  4. Government 'has undermined' new renewable energies

    Debate on threats presented by climate change

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Grantchester

    Summing up for Labour, Lord Grantchester says the time to identify new ways to tackle climate change is running out.

    He adds that more can be done with housing and energy efficiency, and since 2015 the government has "undermined" the establishment of new renewable energies.

    He questions whether the government is looking far enough into the future, suggesting that the focus remains on short-term fixes which will not be enough.

    "The government needs to invest in a green economy, new skills and new industries", he adds.

  5. Sports Minister: We want 'fair deal for fans'

    Adjournment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mims Davies

    Sports Minister Mims Davies says fans have a right to raise concerns about the management of their clubs, with all football clubs required to have an "open dialogue" with fans.

    The government has taken further steps by asking the FA to carry out an intense review of football club ownership, she says.

    Current owner and directors tests have been strengthened, whilst new owners have to provide sources and sufficiency of funding in place, she adds.

    "I am unafraid to go further and to give more focus to this...we will continue to look for a fair deal for fans", she says.

    On Newcastle United, she says "to the best of our knowledge, Newcastle's owner is complying...and the club is meeting all requirements of meeting with supporters".

    That does not mean Mike Ashley could not go further however, pointing out that it will be far easier for him to sell the club if he looks after it.

  6. 'There is always more that can be done'

    Debate on threats presented by climate change

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Redesdale

    Summing up for the Liberal Democrats, Lord Redesdale says flooding poses a severe threat as the UK's drainage system is still designed for the 1950s.

    He says it is important everyone makes small changes to their lives to help the planet, which on a large scale will make a big difference.

    Lord Redesdale says the UK is on the right track to tackling climate change, but "there is always more that can be done".

  7. Labour MP leads adjournment debate on Newcastle United FC

    Adjournment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chi Onwurah

    MPs now turn to the adjournment debate, which tonight is led by Labour MP Chi Onwurah and focuses on the regulation of Newcastle United FC.

    She says that since today's debate was announced, she has been able to hold a "robust" meeting with the club's owner - and Sports Direct owner - Mike Ashley about his running of the club.

    She calls on Newcastle fans to refrain from "personal attacks" against him, adding that they are "wrong and hurt our cause".

    The club's financial accounts are not accessible, she says, but there is considerable concern among fans that money is not being used appropriately.

    "Why is it that football is left to regulate itself, when social media companies and other businesses must meet social requirements?", she asks.

    She calls for an inquiry into the financial reporting requirements of Premier League clubs, using Newcastle United "as a test case".

  8. Lib Dem peer warns of climate threat to agriculture

    Debate on threats presented by climate change

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Miller

    Liberal Democrat MP Baroness Miller of Chilthorne Domer says one of the worst threats of climate change will be the effect of extreme weather on the agricultural system.

    She notes that it is 46 degrees in parts of Australia today, and the Central Land Council has said they could carry out an emergency cull of 120 horses, goats and donkeys that are dying in the heatwave.

    The UK needs to change the way it produces food and the population need to change its diet, she says, although noting that there is "no need" for everyone to give up meat altogether.

    Conservative peer the Earl of Caithness says the West is "terribly good at thinking we're good at tackling climate change", but there is more to be done.

    He adds that members of all parties should work together in the interest of the planet, and listen to expert advice.

  9. Health Minister: We don't underestimate ME

    Appropriate ME Treatment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Steve Brine

    Winding up for the government, Health Minister Steve Brine says they "do not for one minute underestimate ME".

    "But the truth is we do not understand the underlying causes of it...there is currently no cure for it", he says.

    The medical profession "have had a bad rap today", he says, "and some of it's deserved".

    Whilst trainee doctors would benefit from greater training, qualified doctors have a responsibility to keep up to date. NICE is updating its guidance for ME, he adds.

    The government seeks to "stimulate the research community" to come forward with the best applications, but often ME research proposals are lacking in sufficient quality.

    Concluding the debate, SNP Carol Monaghan says there is excellent research already going on, but it is funded by charities, adding: "government needs to take this seriously".

  10. Labour: Government funding for ME research 'long overdue'

    Appropriate ME Treatment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sharon Hodgson

    Shadow health minister Sharon Hodgson says patients are often "passed from pillar to post" when seeking treatment, with huge delays in diagnosis that do not meet NICE guidelines.

    The government should do more, she says, "and considering they don't currently do much, that isn't too much to ask".

    Research funding from the government is "long overdue", she says, as research is currently completely done by charities, with some researchers even relying on crowdfunding.

    "We must ensure that the stigma of ME is tackled", she says.

  11. 'We cannot inspire only through fear'

    Debate on threats presented by climate change

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bethell

    Conservative peer Lord Bethell says the key is to latch on to a large change in public opinion as now more than ever, people want to help protect the planet.

    He says UK emissions have been cut by 42%, faster than any other G7 nation, which is "a hell of an achievement" and "should not be underestimated".

    Lord Bethell says everyone must work harder to "shore up the political consensus", and this can be done by talking about an optimistic future.

    "We have to try and create a sense of opportunity," he adds, "we cannot inspire only through fear".

  12. ME 'leading cause' of long-term school absence

    Appropriate ME Treatment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim Shannon

    DUP MP Jim Shannon says ME affects 25,000 children in the UK and is said to be the leading cause of long-term school absence due to illness.

    He says people suffering from the condition are repeatedly turned down for personal independence payments (PIPs), a kind of disability benefit.

    The system needs to move away from the "if it can't be tested, it can't be helped" approach.

    SNP MP Philippa Whitford says many sufferers resent ME being referred to as chronic fatigue syndrome, she says, because it "sounds so trivial".

    A better description would be "chronic exhaustion syndrome", she says.

    She says it is hard for doctors to help because it is so hard to prove a patient is suffering from ME and not something else, whilst there is no known effective treatment or cure.

    It is "quite sinister", she adds, that some previous research into ME was funded by the Department of Work & Pensions, which she says has penalised suffers.

  13. MPs point out relative lack of ME research funding

    Appropriate ME Treatment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Plaid Cymru Ben Lake says ME affects more people than Parkinson's disease and MS combined, yet it receives just 0.02% of research funding.

    "We simply cannot wait any longer", he says.

    Labour MP Nick Thomas-Symonds says there needs to be far greater awareness and research on ME. He echoes Ben Lake in pointing out how little research funding it receives compared to other illnesses.

    The World Health Organisation classifies ME as a neurological condition, he points out, suggesting that for warrants greater attention, rather than it being treated as a psychological condition as it currently is.

  14. 'Fossil fuels have had their day' - Lib Dem peer

    Debate on threats presented by climate change

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Sheehan

    Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Sheehan says it is time to stop the "blanket subsidy" to fossil fuel power.

    A fundamental change is needed in the industries we want to support, she says, calling for green energy to be at the forefront of new industrial projects.

    The malign effects of climate change are felt across the globe, she adds, noting that it is not about placing blame on a particular country on industry, but ensuring everyone takes more responsibility.

    "Fossil fuels have had their day, it's time to stop using them and clean up after them," she says.

  15. Time restriction placed on ME treatment debate

    Appropriate ME Treatment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons

    There are a relatively large number of MPs still looking to speak in today's backbench business debate on ME treatment, which can only continue until 5pm.

    As a result, Deputy Speaker Dame Eleanor Laing has had to impose a time limit on speeches of three minutes.

  16. Calls for ME sufferers to 'be believed by GPs'

    Appropriate ME Treatment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Emma Lewell-Buck

    Conservative MP Nicky Morgan says more research into ME could improve treatment, but even "having a GP who not only believes you but wants to help...would make a huge difference."

    Labour's Emma Lewell-Buck says women are often treated as lazy or hysterical when suffering from ME, and risk being stripped of benefits when they are unable to work.

    Those doctors who want to help risk being "hauled up" by the General Medical Council, she says, but often patients are just dismissed.

    "There must be nothing worse for someone knowing how ill they are than being told it's all in their head and being sneered at by the very professionals and organisations that should be supporting them", she adds.

  17. 'Clock is ticking' on climate change

    Debate on threats presented by climate change

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Teverson

    Over in the Lords, Liberal Democrat peer Lord Teverson has opened a debate on the threats presented by climate change.

    He says the increase in temperatures is already 1 degree above pre-industrial levels, bringing the risks of extreme weather, flooding and sea level rises.

    "Progress has been made", he says, "but this is something that still needs to be tackled as the clock is ticking".

    In the last two years global emissions went up by 1.6%, Lord Teverson says, acknowledging that most of this growth comes from China and India.

    He suggests that investment in renewable energy is falling because a previous budget from former Chancellor George Osborne reduced incentives to build zero-emission homes.