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Live Reporting

By Georgina Pattinson

All times stated are UK

  1. That's all for this week

    Thanks for joining us for today's debate.

    We'll be back on Monday at 2.30pm for the last week in Westminster before the Christmas recess.

  2. Archbishop points to 'costly forgiveness' as reconciliation

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Most Revd Justin Welby, the Archbishop of Canterbury, points to contributions in the debate, and he says one phrase that stuck with him was "costly forgiveness".

    Another point that has come out of the debate is the importance of values, which "give real authority" to our interventions, he says.

  3. Government 'must collaborate with partners'

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Defence Minister Earl Howe says that reconciliation is a vital part of ending conflict and also preventing a relapse into conflict.

    What the debate has highlighted is that the government needs to do more with civil society, supporting grass roots figures such as church leaders and those in the private sector - and he points to the work of the British Council.

    He says the government must collaborate more closely with international partners to prevent conflict. But peacekeeping is becoming more dangerous, he says.

    He says the aid budget is designed to tackle great global challenges, including migration and terrorism, as well as climate change.

  4. Labour wants to see renewed internationalism - Collins

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Collins of Highbury says the US president Donald Trump's tweets have been increasingly inflammatory, and they have impact beyond the US's borders.

    The maintenance of a rules-based international order has been tough in the face of challenges, he says.

    "We need to do a better job of making the case than we have in the past," Lord Collins says. That includes supporting the UN, Nato and the World Trade Organisation.

    The Labour party would support a renewed commitment to internationalism, he says, developing sanctions and soft power as a response.

  5. Development 'needs to be done in the right way' - Lib Dem peer

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Lord Alderdice says the debate has included moving contributions.

    He says there is an important role for the Ministry of Defence and the armed forces; as well as the Department for International Development.

    But if "it's not done in the right way", he says, things go wrong. He cites Northern Ireland, saying money was put in there but it led to "upwardly mobile terrorists".

  6. Lord Jay calls for tolerance at home

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Jay of Ewelme, a crossbench or independent peer, and a former ambassador to France, says it is possible to conduct a foreign policy based on self interest.

    But he says if the UK seeks to follow moral values abroad, then those need to apply at home too.

  7. UK government should consider involvement carefully - Brady

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Reconciliation in conflict zones is a necessary condition for lasting peace, Conservative peer Baroness Brady says.

    She says it is apposite that today's debate is called by the Archbishop of Canterbury, she says, because often faith-based organisations are all that is left in conflict areas.

    She says, though, that she doesn't believe it is right for the UK government to be involved. It is difficult to justify using taxpayers' money in such instances, and often there is a low chance of success, she says.

    The UK government should act but it is the armed forces who should be involved to bring about peace - and it is then that international development agencies and NGOs should be involved.

    She calls for the international aid budget to be repurposed to the defence budget and the UK's commitment to Nato.

  8. Peer remembers reconciliation role in Northern Ireland

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Trimble

    Conservative peer Lord Trimble is the next peer to speak.

    Lord Trimble was the first First Minister of Northern Ireland, from 1998 to 2002 and the leader of the Ulster Unionist Party. He was instrumental in the party's acceptance of the Good Friday Agreement.

    He says he recognises the phrase "bottom up" when it comes to reconciliation - attempts to resolve the problems in Northern Ireland failed because they were not based in the local communities.

    Lord Trimble says he believes that although the two main parties in Northern Ireland today - the DUP and Sinn Fein - have fallen out, leading to the suspension of the Northern Ireland Assembly, he has "no doubt" that will be resolved.

  9. Archbishop of Canterbury opens debate

    Debate on reconciliation

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Archbishop says the week past has been a week of deep division and although the debate focuses on foreign affairs, it could apply to the UK.

    He tells peers that at the heart of the church, is reconciliation. In a human world, "disagreeing well" is crucial, and says this is a theme he will return to.

  10. Good morning

    Welcome to our coverage of today in the House of Lords.

    The Archbishop of Canterbury has tabled today's debate on the role of reconciliation in British foreign, defence and international development policy.

  11. That's it from us

    The Lords debate on young people finishes - they will now hear a repeat of the statement in the Commons earlier on police funding.

    However that's where we leave our coverage of Parliament for today.

    MPs are back in the Commons next Monday - do join us then.

  12. Careers advice 'an important priority'

    Challenges facing young people

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Agnew of Oulton

    Education Minister Lord Agnew of Oulton says the government has committed £70m for careers advisers in schools, which he calls an "extremely important priority".

    The government is delivering a "manifesto commitment" to address "poor outcomes" for children in need of "help and protection", he says.

    "Bullying can come in many forms," he says, adding that it is no longer confined to the classroom.

    He adds that the number of people on zero-hour contracts is down on previous years.

  13. Labour peer: University admission not egalitarian

    Challenges facing young people

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Griffiths of Burry Port

    Labour's Lord Griffiths of Burry Port says young person with "splendid A levels" recently told him he didn't want to go to university because becoming a lawyer "takes too long" and there are too many obstacles for black people.

    Lord Griffiths said he told him there was too much quick money to be made in crime, football, drugs and fame.

    He says universities often insist their admissions processes are "egalitarian", but he adds they are "anything but".

  14. MPs debating rural post offices

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate on a public health approach to youth violence has now ended.

    The last item of business tonight is a short adjournment debate on rural post offices, led by Tory MP Derek Thomas.

  15. Lib Dem peer advocates education on internet use

    Challenges facing young people

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Storey

    Liberal Democrat education spokesman Lord Storey says four out of five people under the age of 13 have a social media presence.

    "We cannot put the internet genie back in the bottle," he says, advocating education on using the internet rather than restricting it.

    He says that local support services for young people have been reduced by government cuts.