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Summary

  1. Earlier: Theresa May questioned on Brexit by senior MPs
  2. Labour granted urgent question on Brexit legal advice
  3. Minister says attorney general will give statement on advice next week
  4. Labour MP reveals he is HIV positive during debate on World Aids Day
  5. Lords debate school funding and tackling violent crime

Live Reporting

All times stated are UK

  1. Video content

    Video caption: World Aids Day: Lloyd Russell-Moyle MP on HIV positive status

    A Labour MP revealed he has been HIV positive for nearly ten years, as the Commons debated World Aids Day.

  2. ..and that's it from us!

    That's it from our coverage from Westminster today.

    We'll be back next week - on Tuesday, MPs begin five days of debate on the government's Brexit deal.

    The final day of debate - and the vote on whether to approve the deal - will take place the following week, on Tuesday 11th December.

  3. That's it from the Lords...

    Debate on the recent increase in violent crime

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Concluding the debate, Lord Harris of Haringey says Baroness Williams's remarks demonstrate that she understands the need for a cross-service response to violent crime.

    He suggests she may need to go back and check someone is overseeing this, and ensuring progress is being made.

    And with that, the House of Lords adjourns until Monday.

  4. Minister: We need to address causes of violent crime

    Debate on the recent increase in violent crime

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Williams of Trafford

    Replying to the debate, Home Office Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford says tackling violent crime is a priority for the government but "there's no sugarcoating what is going on at the moment".

    Ministers recognise the need for a cross-service, cross-government approach, she adds.

    "Law enforcement is very important, but we also need to work with other sectors so that we can address the causes of violent crime", she adds.

    The nature of crime has changed, she says, and the Home Office is looking at how police can get the resources they need to deal with this, she tells peers.

  5. Labour: Policing 'a shadow of its former self'

    Debate on the recent increase in violent crime

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Kennedy of Southwark

    Wrapping up the debate for Labour, Lord Kennedy of Southwark says police cuts mean policing is a "shadow of its former self".

    He says there is much the opposition can support in the government's Serious Violence Strategy, but agrees with criticism that it is "long on analysis but short on strategy".

  6. Roundup: Today in the Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That's it from the Commons - which has now adjourned until Monday.

    The day began with environment ministers taking questions from MPs - Environment Secretary Michael Gove even had a go replying to one in French.

    Then Labour were given the opportunity to ask an urgent question about how much of the attorney general's legal advice on Brexit the government would be publishing.

    Solicitor General Robert Buckland told MPs ministers would publish a "reasoned statement" on the advice, and the attorney general will take questions in Parliament next Monday.

    However opposition MPs said that wasn't good enough, with the DUP's Westminster leader suggesting ministers had "something to hide" by not publishing the advice in full.

    MPs then debated education standards, before Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle revealed he is HIV positive during the adjournment debate on World Aids Day.

  7. Peer laments Kids Company collapse

    Debate on the recent increase in violent crime

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hastings of Scarisbrick

    Crossbench peer Lord Hastings of Scarisbrick says the highest rises in knife crime have been in areas where Kids Company had its best operations.

    The high-profile charity closed in 2016 amid a row about funding, with its performance and management under scrutiny.

    The charity's collapse and the "character assassination" of its founder, Camila Batmanghelidjh, has had a hugely negative affect, he says.

    Kids Company, he adds, showed a "relational response" is the best catalyst for reducing violent crime.

  8. Labour MP: I had 'narrow escape' from HIV

    HIV and World Aids Day Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Emma Dent Coad

    Labour MP Emma Dent Coad says she had "a narrow escape" from HIV in the 1980s.

    She says she took a HIV test and had "an agonising two weeks before the results came", but took a test last week ahead of this debate "and it literally takes two minutes".

    She thanks Mr Russell-Moyle for his "brilliant speech", and calls on the government to back the rollout of new preventative medications.

  9. 'HIV is political'

    HIV and World Aids Day debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stephen Doughty

    Labour's Stephen Doughty says Lloyd Russell-Moyle's speech was "clear, honest and impactful" and congratulates him for "not shying away from the fact that HIV is political".

    He also says it's more than possible to hit the UN's goal of eradicating transmission of HIV by 2030.

    He says there's still some way to go in the UK, because people are still diagnosed too late and up to one in eight people who have HIV don't know it.

  10. Tory peer: Cocaine users fuel violent crime

    Debate on the recent increase in violent crime

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Bertin

    Conservative Baroness Bertin says many people will actively choose to use a reusable coffee cup for moral reasons, but then will have no problem using cocaine on a weekend.

    People are concerned at increases of violent crime, but help fuel it through their support for the illegal drug industry, she says.

    This complacency is part of the issue, she says, and people need to take more consideration of the impact of their actions.

  11. Former Met chief: Police numbers not an excuse

    Debate on the recent increase in violent crime

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hogan-Howe

    Former head of the Met Police Lord Hogan-Howe says police shortages take far longer to fix than people realise, as recruitment takes far longer than people expect.

    Action is need now to resolve staff shortages, he says.

    He warns however that police numbers cannot be used as an excuse - police have got to do as much as they can with the resources they have, he says.

    Policing, he says, needs to become more of a profession like the law or medicine.

  12. Corbyn praises 'historic speech'

    HIV and World Aids Day Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn

    In a rare appearance for an adjournment debate, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says he is proud of his party colleague for making a "brilliant and historic speech".

    There are "appalling levels of prejudice and abuse against the LGBT community", he says.

    "We need to make sure the rest of the world understands," he adds.

    "We have to close our minds to prejudice, and open our minds to human rights and justice for people all over the world".

  13. 'We are at a juncture in the fight against HIV'

    HIV and World Aids Day Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lloyd Russell-Moyle

    Lloyd Russell-Moyle says he has "had to come to terms with the fear" but he is "HIV positive undetectable" as he has been taking treatment for years, so cannot pass on HIV to anyone else.

    "You hope this is some joke, some technical error. You try and imagine the way you will get out of this.

    In that NHS room they tell you. It hits you like a wall. Nothing quite prepares you for that moment."

    He adds: “I am leading this debate today because we are in many ways at a juncture in the fight against HIV and Aids.

    We could be more vocal, more ambitious, more determined to eradicate the disease in the UK. Or, we could go in the direction of the government, which is putting our hard-fought progress at risk.”

    Mr Lloyd Russell-Moyle says he is only the second MP after Chris Smith to openly to live with HIV.

    "No person diagnosed with HIV today should feel they are any less able to enjoy living their lives", he tells MPs.

  14. Labour MP reveals he is HIV positive

    HIV and World Aids Day Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lloyd Russell-Moyle

    Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle is now introducing his adjournment debate on HIV and World AIDS day, taking place on 1st December.

    Mr Russell-Moyle begins by saying it has been almost ten years since he was diagnosed with HIV, and that this is the first time he has disclosed this.

    "If so many other people can talk about it, then so should I", he says.

    "I want to stand in this place and say to people with HIV that our status doesn't define us", he adds.

    "It is better to live in knowledge than die in fear."