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Live Reporting

Alun Jones and Nia Harri

All times stated are UK

  1. Hwyl fawr

    That brings today's lengthy proceedings in the Siambr to a close.

    Senedd Live returns tomorrow morning for the Economy, Infrastructure and Skills Committee.

    View more on twitter
  2. AMs repeal EU continuity law

    AMs approve the draft Law Derived from the European Union (Wales) Act 2018 (Repeal) Regulations 2018, after the Welsh Government said the law is no longer needed following agreement with ministers in Westminster over the long-running Brexit "power-grab" row.

    There were 40 for, no abstentions, and eight against.

    The vote
  3. Ferret-like or terrier-like?

    Julie Morgan congratulates Lynne Neagle on her "ferret-like nature".

    Upon reflection, she then refers to her "terrier-like nature".

    Lynne Neagle and Julie Morgan
    Image caption: Lynne Neagle and Julie Morgan
  4. Statement by the Chair of the Children, Young People and Education Committee

    The final item today is a Statement by the Chair of the Children, Young People and Education Committee, Lynne Neagle: United Nations Universal Children's Day.

    Universal Children’s Day was first announced by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1954. Originally, there were two goals for this day: to encourage children of all races, creeds and religions to spend time together, getting to know each other and appreciating each other’s differences, and to prompt governments worldwide to pay more attention to the welfare of their youngest citizens.

    Lynne Neagle updates members on the work of the Children, Young People and Education Committee in holding the Welsh Government to account regarding the education, health and well-being of the children and young people of Wales.

    Lynne Neagle
  5. 'Ynni Cymru to accelerate the development of renewable energy'

    Plaid Cymru's Llyr Gruffydd calls for the "full devolution of all powers over energy to Wales", and "for the establishment of Ynni Cymru to accelerate the development of renewable energy in Wales with a strong focus on community energy and public ownership".

    Llyr Gruffydd
  6. 'Importance of Wylfa Newydd'

    The Conservative Andrew RT Davies calls on AMs to recognise "the importance of Wylfa Newydd to the delivery of a sustainable long-term energy mix in Wales and endorses the First Minister’s comments regarding the transformative potential of this major energy infrastructure development to the North Wales economy", and also "the importance of securing community support when planning large-scale renewable energy projects and regrets the Cabinet Secretary’s intervention regarding the Hendy Wind Farm development, which does not respect this important principle, and calls on the Welsh Government to reconsider this decision".

    Andrew RT Davies
  7. 'Oppose the use of nuclear power'

    Independent AM Neil McEvoy (South Wales Central) calls on the Welsh Government to "oppose the use of nuclear power as a means to achieve a low carbon energy system".

    Neil McEvoy
  8. 'Urgent need to decarbonise the energy system in Wales'

    The topic of the final debate today is "How do we achieve a low carbon energy system for Wales?"

    The Welsh Government proposes that the assembly:

    1. Notes the 2017 Energy Generation in Wales Report, published on 13 November 2018.

    2. Notes that, in order to deliver the 80 per cent carbon emissions reduction target in the Environment (Wales) Act 2016, there is an urgent need to decarbonise the energy system in Wales by:

    a) taking forward regional, whole energy system planning to support a low carbon economy;

    b) recognising the potential for a range of energy generation technologies, and the need for smart solutions to balance energy generation with demand;

    c) accelerating deployment of low carbon energy development, where it provides benefit to Wales, recognising the current difficult investment climate; and

    d) further developing the grid in Wales as part of place based plans.

    Lesley Griffiths
    Image caption: Cabinet Secretary for Energy, Planning and Rural Affairs, Lesley Griffiths
  9. 'Puzzling'

    Plaid Cymru's Steffan Lewis says repealing the Continuity Act could set a dangerous precedent that allows Westminster to legislate in devolved areas in the future.

    He adds it is "puzzling" why the Welsh Government wants to repeal the Act before the Supreme Court has delivered its judgement about whether the Scottish Continuity Bill is within the Scottish Parliament’s competence.

    He says AMs should, at the very least, wait until the judgement before voting to repeal the Act.

    He urges AMs to reject the repeal of the Continuity Act.

    Steffan Lewis
  10. Continuity Act was 'unnecessary'

    Darren Millar points out that the Conservatives said that the Law Derived from the European Union (Wales) Act 2018 was "unnecessary" from the outset and therefore welcome its repeal, "even after quite a delay".

    Darren Millar
  11. 'Fallback measure'

    Following months of talks, ministers and officials in Westminster and Cardiff reached agreement in April over changes relating to devolution to the UK Government's EU (Withdrawal) Act.

    As a result, the Mark Drakeford explains that the Welsh Government feels it no longer needs the Continuity Act, which he says was passed as a "fallback measure" before the 'inter-governmental agreement' was reached.

    Mark Drakeford
  12. Continuity Act no longer needed?

    We move on to a debate on a Welsh Government proposal to scrap a Brexit law that was passed to protect the assembly's powers.

    In March, AMs voted to pass the Continuity Act to bring powers over devolved matters currently operated at an EU level to the Senedd.

    But the Welsh Government says the law is no longer needed following agreement with ministers in Westminster over the long-running Brexit "power-grab" row.

    The Senedd passed the Continuity Act, to protect the assembly's powers following Brexit, in March
    Image caption: The Senedd passed the Continuity Act, to protect the assembly's powers following Brexit, in March
    View more on twitter
  13. 97% of homeless young people have experienced at least one Adverse Childhood Experience

    Research from Llamau suggests that 97% of homeless young people have experienced at least one Adverse Childhood Experience (ACE). Llamau notes that:

    • 25% of the homeless young people they support have been in care;
    • 90% of the young people they support meet the criteria for at least one current mental health issue; and
    • Approximately 15% of the young people they support have been involved with youth offending services.
    View more on twitter
  14. 'Collaborative and preventative approach'

    Rebecca Evans, Minister for Housing and Regeneration, says the additional £10m "funding allocations I have announced today take a collaborative and preventative approach to this complex issue and demonstrate our cross-government commitment to tackling youth homelessness."

    The Welsh Government intends to see an end to the practice of placing homeless 16 and 17 year olds into bed and breakfast accommodation.

    The Code of Guidance for Local Authorities on the Allocation of Accommodation and Homelessness was revised in 2016, and now states that Welsh Ministers intend to see an end to the use of B&B accommodation for single 16 and 17 year olds, and will encourage and support the minimisation of the use of this form of temporary accommodation.

    Rebecca Evans
    Image caption: Rebecca Evans, Minister for Housing and Regeneration.
  15. Statement by the Minister for Housing and Regeneration

    The next statement today is by the Minister for Housing and Regeneration Rebecca Evans: "Investing in Early Intervention and Cross Government Approaches to Tackle Youth Homelessness".

    Earlier this year, a Labour AM warned that scrapping the ring-fence on a grant for councils to help vulnerable people live independent lives will "undermine" all the work done to deal with rough sleeping,

    Dawn Bowden criticised her own Welsh Government's decision to overhaul the Supporting People Programme.

  16. 'FE lecturers to be awarded a pay deal commensurate to school teachers'

    Eluned Morgan announces that teachers in FE colleges in Wales will be paid the same amount as teachers in school sixth forms who are doing the same job.

    She also proposes to change the way part time provision is funded, planned and delivered. In future, part time provision will be prioritised to the proportion of the population who only hold a level 2 qualification.

    She adds, "I am also changing the way we fund the post-16 Welsh Baccalaureate. Currently, A Level and equivalent programmes are funded at the same value whether the Welsh Bacc is being delivered or not. This is because where the Welsh Bacc is not being delivered, providers are expected to deliver, as a minimum, three Essential Skills Wales qualifications.

    "However, data has shown us that this is not necessarily happening as expected, with learners missing out on important skills development. Therefore, from 2019, the Welsh Bacc will be funded as a separate qualification; and funded as equivalent to an A Level. I will also be looking at how we can implement this change within vocational programmes from 2020."

  17. Statement by the Minister for Welsh Language and Lifelong Learning

    The next statement is by the Minister for Welsh Language and Lifelong Learning Eluned Morgan, on the Review of Further Education Funding.

    Funding for further education institutions (FEIs) and school sixth forms are funded in different ways:

    • FEIs receive their allocation of funding directly from the Welsh Government on an academic year cycle; and
    • Funding for school sixth forms is allocated by the Welsh Government to local authorities, on a financial year basis, who then pass this funding on to individual sixth forms.

    A local authority can retain up to 3 per cent of its total allocation for centrally retained services which relate to post-16 education.

    Eluned Morgan
  18. 'Should be able to study in the world's best universities'

    Bethan Sayed says "Plaid Cymru believes that students from Wales should be able to study in the world's best universities and to have the opportunity to live and work abroad".

    Bethan Sayed
  19. 2% of Welsh students at universities currently spend time abroad

    Conservative Janet Finch-Saunders says she was "shocked" to learn that only 2% of Welsh students at universities currently spend time abroad studying, volunteering or undertaking work experience as part of their studies.

    Janet Finch-Saunders
  20. 'Never been more important to be global citizens'

    Kirsty Williams says "at a time when it’s never been more important for our students and graduates to be global citizens, we need to ensure that international opportunities are an aspiration for many more students.

    “As someone who benefited hugely from time studying abroad as an undergraduate, I know how such an experience broadens horizons, expands key skills and ensures connections that last a lifetime."

    She adds, “This new pilot will allow us to reach out to these students and ensure that they too can now take full advantaged of these opportunities.

    “I want to see the number of Welsh students who spend time abroad as part of their studies, double by the end of this government. This pilot is just one of the ways in which we’re trying to achieve that aim.”