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Summary

  1. Environment questions to Michael Gove and team
  2. Urgent question on hostile environment agenda
  3. Urgent question on policing during US president's visit
  4. Business statement from Leader of the House
  5. Statement on Brexit white paper

Live Reporting

By Richard Morris and Lucy Webster

All times stated are UK

  1. Today in the Commons

    What happened?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Two urgent questions and a statement kept the Commons busy today.

    The sitting was briefly suspended about a minute into Dominic Raab's first speech from the dispatch box as Exiting the EU Secretary. The Speaker was unhappy that MPs did not have copies of the Brexit white paper in front of them to ask questions, so MPs started distributing them amongst themselves, during which time the sitting was suspended.

    MPs from all parties were critical of the move, while Mr Raab said he would speak to the clerks office over the confusion.

    The long-awaited White Paper is aimed at ensuring trade co-operation, with no hard border for Northern Ireland, and global trade deals for the UK.

    It fleshes out the Chequers agreement that sparked the resignations of Boris Johnson and David Davis.

    The UK is hoping the EU will back the proposals in the White Paper so an exit deal can be struck by the autumn, ahead of the UK's official departure from the EU in March.

    Labour MPs asked two further questions, one on the pausing of the hostile environment policy for those over 30 in the wake of the Windrush scandal; and the second on police staffing and funding levels during the visit of the US President, Donald Trump.

    The Commons returns at 2:30pm on Monday, with Home Office questions.

  2. Government must do everything it can to stop this from happening again

    Carillion collapse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business Minister Andrew Griffiths says it is easy to "underestimate" how significant the collapse of Carillion was, including the impacts on the lives of "too many".

    It is important that "everything" the government does is to prevent this from happening again, he says.

    The business secretary has commissioned a review into the responsibilities of the Financial Reporting Council, he adds.

    He adds that "thousands of documents are being considered" in trying to trace what went wrong at Carillion.

  3. Carillion collapse 'a fiasco'

    Carillion collapse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow business minister Bill Esterson says the collapse of Carillion was "a fiasco" for the 30,000 employees and 20,000 sub-contractors, the 27,000 members of its defined pension scheme, 30,000 suppliers owed £2bn in unpaid invoices, the children who depended on school meals, armed services personnel whose housing is mismanaged and the taxpayer who is picking up the tab for the colossal failure of the government to safeguard large sums of public money.

    He says the "cosy" way in which the big four accountancy firms (Deloitte, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Ernst & Young, and KPMG) operate must come to and end and ask if the government supports calls for the big four to be broken up.

    He ends by saying that Labour in government would be a party of business for the many, not the few.

  4. Collapse of Carillion nothing to be surprised about - SNP

    Carillion collapse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chris Stephens

    The SNP's Chris Stephens says that the mystery of Carillion's collapse is not something to be surprised about, but instead the surprise was how long the company lasted for.

    He says the company exploited suppliers and "gamed with public assets" and sought to "eliminate any competitors".

  5. 'Directors are culpable'

    Carillion collapse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ms Reeves says the directors, who made the decisions which led to the company's collapse, still refuse to accept their responsibility and continue to deny the findings of her committee's report.

    She says they awarded themselves bonuses while workers have lost jobs and pensions.

    She says the auditors, including KPMG, also did not issue the appropriate warnings. She says auditors have the wrong incentives because they report to senior managers.

    She says that when management and the auditors were seen to be failing, the regulators should have stepped in. She says they were too "passive" and acted too late. She says the pension regulator eventually "barked but did not bite."

    She concludes that "urgent action" must be taken for those affected and for those who would be affected if the same were to happen again.

    "Best value is not the same as lowest price," she says.

  6. Warning lights should have been flashing

    Carillion collapse debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rachel Reeves

    MPs move on to a debate on the collapse of Carillion, introduced by the Chair of the Business Committee, Rachel Reeves.

    She says that this Sunday will be six months since Carillion collapsed, owing money to suppliers and subcontractors and with major projects "mothballed".

    Five committees have looked into its collapse, she says, with her committee considering the causes for its demise.

    "Warning lights should have been flashing when such a big business was on the brink," she says.

  7. Children and parents have suffered from this

    Forced adoption debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nadhim Zahawi

    Education Minister Nadhim Zahawi says that many adopted children have struggled with "overwhelming" feelings of rejection and with forming attachments.

    "It is truly shocking to hear how single mothers were treated at that time in our country," he says, while adding that the church has apologised for their role in this.

    He says that there general principle that children are better looked after by their own family. He adds that these days forced separation takes place from a court order.

  8. These stories are of 'powerlessness' - Labour

    Forced adoption debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Emma Lewell-Buck

    The shadow children and families minister, Emma Lewell-Buck, says that "culturally, the 50s, 60s and 70s" when the majority of these adoption orders were made, was a different time.

    Welfare benefits were not available and sex education was nonexistent, which affected people who had children out of wedlock, she says.

    She adds that many of the stories from the time show the "powerlessness" women experienced.

    The very least these women need "is an apology," she says.

  9. MPs debating forced adoptions

    Forced adoption debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Commons motion

    MPs are holding a debate on the practice of forced adoption - a backbench business debate proposed by Labour MPs Alison McGovern and Stephen Twigg.

  10. MPs hear a statement on the Western Balkans

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Serbia's Prime Minister Ana Brnabic and Prime Minister Theresa May
    Image caption: German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Serbia's Prime Minister Ana Brnabic and Prime Minister Theresa May during a reception at the end of the Western Balkans Summit

    The statement on the Brexit white paper concludes and MPs move on to a statement by a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee on global Britain and the Western Balkans.

    On 9 and 10 July 2018, the UK hosted the 5th annual Western Balkans Summit.

    Committee member, and Labour MP, Mike Gapes says, due to the resignation of the summit host - the then Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson - the summit "didn't get the attention it deserved".

    He says this was the first time the UK had hosted the summit and was "a test of the UK's commitment to European scrutiny".

  11. 'Don't listen to siren voices,' says Tory MP

    Brexit white paper statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stephen Metcalfe

    Conservative Stephen Metcalfe says his constituents want reassurance the white paper will "return control over our borders, over our money and our laws".

    "Don't listen to the siren voices," he urges, advising people to instead look at the document "and see where it delivers".

  12. Streeting: MPs don't take proposals seriously

    Brexit white paper statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Wes Streeting

    Labour's Wes Streeting suggests that the government's white paper "doesn't command the support of a majority of the House of Commons".

    He asks how the EU, European Commission or European Parliament can take the proposals seriously "because this house, it is clear, does not."

    Dominic Raab accuses the MP of "blithely skating over divisions in his own party".

    He defends the government's plan as a "positive, principled approach that is deliverable".

  13. Colleagues have 'grave concerns' about this

    Brexit white paper statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Andrew Bridgen

    Conservative Andrew Bridgen says colleagues have "grave concerns" about this proposal, in terms of how it will play out the wishes of the British people during the referendum.

    He asks why Mr Raab's first choice of special advisor, Stewart Jackson, was rejected by the Cabinet Office.

    Mr Raab pays tribute to the work of special advisors and says he will be naming his shortly.

  14. Role of European Court of Justice questioned

    Brexit white paper statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Jones

    Conservative David Jones says that the role of the European Court of Justice is preserved as the interpreter of EU rules in the UK. He asks what kind of audience British applicants to the court could expect when no longer an EU country.

    Mr Raab says there is provision for "consistent interpretation" of the law under the ECJ. The UK would have a veto over decisions, he says, adding that the UK needs to have agreement over common rules.

  15. Brexiteer Tory raises doubts over common rulebook

    Brexit white paper statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Owen Paterson

    Brexit-supporting Conservative Owen Paterson asks the Brexit secretary if the "common rulebook" will lead to EU policy being put back into UK law without the ability to amend it.

    Dominic Raab says the common rulebook will only apply to the extent that is necessary to avoid friction at the border.

    What's the common rulebook? Have a look here.

  16. 'Nonsense' that MPs got this so late, Hoey says

    Brexit white paper statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Kate Hoey

    Labour's Kate Hoey says that it is "nonsense" that MPs got the white paper so late, and she asks if Angela Merkel has seen this document before MPs.

    She asks for assurances that European citizens will no longer receive special treatment in immigration after the UK leaves the EU.

    Mr Raab says that freedom of movement is something which discriminates the rest of the world against EU nationals in UK immigration.

  17. Post-Brexit immigration policy questioned

    Brexit white paper statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Home Affairs Committee chair Yvette Cooper questions why there is a lack of detail on the government's post-Brexit immigration plan.

    Dominic Raab responds that the paper is very clear that free movement will end.

    Home Secreatry Sajid Javid told the Home Affairs Committee on Tuesday that there will be a separate white paper on post-Brexit immigration in the autumn.