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Summary

  1. Culture questions in the Commons
  2. Attorney general questions follow
  3. Urgent question on Defence, fire and rescue contract
  4. Business statement outlines week ahead
  5. Government statements on universal credit, and on citizens' rights
  6. Debates on refugee family reunions and Erasmus+ and successor schemes
  7. Peers meet for questions
  8. Debates on carers; and armed forces reserves

Live Reporting

By Richard Morris, Lucy Webster and Robbie Hawkins

All times stated are UK

  1. Today in the Commons

    What happened?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons today heard the first details of the proposed "settled status" scheme for EU nationals who continue to live in the UK after the country has left the EU.

    Settled status will cost £65, or £32.50 for children under 16. It will be available to all EU citizens once they have lived in the UK for more than five years; for citizens applying before they have lived in the UK for five years, they will be granted pre-settled status.

    In other events, the government were criticised by Labour for their response to an NAO report published which says that Universal Credit could cost more than the current system it is due to replace.

    Ministers were also called to the despatch box after an urgent question by Labour on the awarding of a fire and rescue contract for the Ministry of Defence was awarded to Capita.

    The Commons will return at 2:30pm on Monday with education questions.

  2. Tory peer: 'I don't really know what I'm talking about'

    BBC journalist tweets

    View more on twitter

    Earl Attlee does go on to elaborate that when he joined the Lords, he was serving in the TA, but hasn't visited an army base for a number of years...

  3. Government: Value for money is vital

    Erasmus+ programme

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sam Gyimah

    Universities minister Sam Gyimah says the government recognises that "the programme has played an important role in achieving some tremendous outcomes".

    He says he's pleased the UK will continue to participate until the end of 2020, and says that the continued participation "is a matter of future negotiations". The government has "made the EU very aware of the UK's desire to continue in the programme" and are looking very closely at the options of continuing "as a third country for a fair contribution".

    Mr Gyimah agrees that value for money is vital and says discussion needs to be based on an assessment of UK priorities.

    "We will ensure the UK secures the best deal."

  4. 'Still very unclear' what will happen - Labour

    Erasmus+ programme

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Gordon Marsden

    Shadow education minister Gordon Marsden says that education programmes like this help with social mobility, something which he says the government claims they want to address.

    He says "it is still very unclear" what will happen after the programme ends in 2020.

    "We continue to believe that it is imperative that future involvement in this programme is on the agenda," he says.

    He says that education and culture ministers should be around the negotiating tables debating the future of this programme.

    The Russell Group has said that it will likely be less costly to maintain membership of it, rather than universities trying to replicate their own schemes, he adds.

  5. Erasmus+ 'good for communities'

    Erasmus+ programme

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Kirsty Blackman

    The SNP's Kirsty Blackman suggests to Huw Merriman that "of course the costs will double if the participants double" and the benefits increase as well.

    She says the UK needs to continue it's links with Europe however it can after Brexit, and the Erasmus+ is a huge opportunity for that.

    "We need to make clear how strong our interest is in this continuing...the more the government can do to state that case, the better for our students, our universities and for our communities."

  6. Tory MPs: We support study abroad

    Erasmus+ programme

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A series of Conservative MPs step up to share their support for the scheme, with Vicky Ford, who declares an interest of having helped "put the plus on Erasmus+", enthusing about the benefits.

    Erasmus graduates are 44% more likely than others to be in management roles in 10 years time, she says.

    Rachel Maclean quotes her own son's enthusiastic words, and Huw Merriman says he shares the same passion for the ability of students to learn from abroad.

    Mr Merriman does say however that he is concerned by the rising costs, which have doubled, and suggests it is a clear example of how people have fallen out of love with the European project. Ms Ford intervenes to defend the spending.

  7. Erasmus uncertainty puts 'successful export at risk'

    Erasmus+ programme

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lloyd Russell-Moyle

    Labour MP Lloyd Russell-Moyle is now opening a debate on the future of the Erasmus+ programme, which allows young people to study across Europe and is not guaranteed to continue after Brexit.

    Support for the scheme, he says, cuts across political parties and across the Brexit debate.

    Mr Russell-Moyle, who worked towards establishing and running the current scheme before becoming an MP, suggests MPs are united by a deep concern at the lack of full commitment to it's future by the government.

    Uncertainty over the scheme's future, he says, "puts at risk the future existence of one of this country's most successful exports - higher education."

  8. Lords debate reserve forces

    Armed forces reserves

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord De Mauley

    Conservative Lord De Mauley opens the debate on the contribution of the Armed Forces reserves by speaking of his own time in the Territorial Army during the Wilson government.

    He gives a history of the changing fortunes of the reserve forces, and then speaks of the challenges they are now facing.

  9. Civil society 'well placed to wrap their arms around' resettled refugees

    Refugee family reunion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Immigration Minister Caroline Nokes says the government has done a great deal of work to enable civil society to play an increased role in the resettlement of refugees.

    She gives one example of where £1m has been given to a group working to support refugees and assist their integration. Indeed, she says, many in society are "well placed to wrap their arms around" resettled refugees.

    This week, she says, she spoke with a group of US teenagers and expressed her dismay at the treatment of children at the hands of Trump's government. She was pleased that they shared her response.

  10. Labour: Government immigration policies 'similar to Trump'

    Refugee family reunion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Home Office Minister Afzal Khan says that while the prime minister has been right to criticise President Donald Trump over the US's treatment of immigrant children, her government follows similar policies.

    The government must halt their approach of making the lives of refugees and asylum seekers so awful that they don't want to come to the UK, he says - as if so-called "pull factors" were what caused them to flee their homes and there weren't enough "push factors" in the first place.

  11. Peer: 'Democracy is in a bit of a mess'

    UK future trade relations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Whitty, who echoes Baroness McIntosh of Pickering in stressing the importance of this debate, expresses surprise that he is the only backbencher wishing to speak.

    He looks back to his younger days, when even then the "far left circles" he spent time were filled with constant disagreement over the benefits of a world trade.

    There is now no universal support for free trade, he suggests, such is the frustration.

    It's not just world trade that has problems, he says, suggesting that when the world order is blamed rather than the government then "democracy is in a bit of a mess".

    The rise of populism, which he describes as "an idea the lower orders find attractive and the elites deplore", is understandable in this situation, and he says it raises questions over whether World Trade Organisation rules are working.

    "We may need to rethink."

  12. Lords debate future trade relations

    UK future trade relations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness McIntosh of Pickering is opening a debate on the UK's future trade relations following the failure to reach an agreement at the G7 Summit in Canada, which the prime minister described as "difficult" with "strong consequences".

    She warns the UK faces many economic challenges following the introduction of high tariffs by the US, combined with the decision to leave the EU, and asks how we will replace the huge existing EU markets we currently access when no obvious alternatives exist.

    "No matter how difficult we might think our relations and negotiations with the EU have been, future negotiations with the World Trade Organisations may be far worse."

  13. Current system 'is not fit for purpose'

    Refugee family reunion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stuart C. McDonald

    The SNP's immigration and asylum spokesperson Stuart C. McDonald says that the current system "is not fit for purpose" and too many decisions are made incorrectly.

    He says that by encouraging safe passage, the UK would undermine traffickers who help people travel illegally.

    He says there is little evidence to show that children are often sent ahead to make it legal for the rest of the family to join. Denmark and the UK are the only countries which have restrictions on family reunions, he states.

    He used to be an immigration solicitor, and he says with his knowledge of the system, legal aid for family reunions is necessary.

  14. Labour peers advises government to 'remember Windrush'

    EU Citizens Statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Williams of Trafford

    Baroness Williams of Trafford has repeated the statement made in the House of Commons outlining the new EU citizen settlement scheme for those that wish to remain in the UK after Brexit.

    Labour spokesperson Lord Rosser in response asks what restrictions there will be on those that take up the scheme, as well as how many are expected to to take up the option.

    He says the government must have a clear view of what it expects from the EU in terms of UK citizens in the EU after Brexit, warning some comments made today would not be helpful in negotiations.

    He warns the government to remember its previous failings, mentioning the Windrush scandal, and to ensure it does not repeat such mistakes. He asks further questions around staffing and funding, and also what will happen if the UK leaves the EU without a deal.

    He says he would accept a written response to his questions if preferred.

  15. People across the country are welcoming to refugee families - MacNeil

    Refugee family reunion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Angus MacNeil says that people all over the country have been proven to be welcoming to refugee families who move into their area.

    In Canterbury, an area of the south east which he says the tabloids frequently portray as overcrowded, has an excellent record of taking in refugee children.

    He says he is "lost" between the idea of "stupidity and evil" at the current situation of children in the United States being separated from their parents when they're accused of trying to get into the country illegally.