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Summary

  1. Private members' bills in the Commons

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

  1. Video content

    Video caption: The upskirting victim campaigning to change the law

    Gina Martin began her campaign after two men took a picture up her skirt at a festival.

  2. 'Upskirting' bill halted in Commons

    Voyeurism (Offences) Bill

    Wera Hobhouse
    Image caption: Ministers said they would support the bill which was brought forward by Wera Hobhouse

    Plans to create a new criminal offence of "upskirting" have been blown off course by a senior Conservative MP.

    The government had signalled its support for plans to to make it against the law in England and Wales for someone to secretly take photographs under a victim's clothes.

    Ministers said they would support a private member's bill being put forward by the Liberal Democrat MP, Wera Hobhouse.

    The draft law was expected to be nodded through.

    But when the title of the Voyeurism (Offences) Bill was read out, the Conservative MP, Sir Christopher Chope, shouted out "object".

    That one word was enough to halt the bill's progress.

  3. End of the day in the House of Commons

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The week's business ends with an adjournment debate led by Conservative Will Quince on efficiency regulations for stage lighting.

    The Commons will return from 2:30pm on Monday.

  4. 'Upskirting' bill delayed

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Time has run out for private members' bills, meaning there is no time to hear the Voyuerism (Offences) Bill, supported by the government, which would create a specific offence of "upskirting".

    The House could have allowed the bill to pass second reading undebated but when its title was read by the clerk a backbench MP shouted an objection.

    The government had said that their whips would allow the bill through.

    The bill will now have to come back on a future day of private members' bills: the next scheduled is 6 July.

  5. Bill talked out at third reading

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    With less than ten minutes for debate time on the bill's third reading, time runs out during a speech by Christopher Chope .

    The bill will have to come back on a later date before finishing its passage through the Commons.

    The next day of private member's bills is 6 July.

  6. Mental health patients will have 'best protection in the world'

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The second amendment pushed to a vote is defeated by 49 votes to three. The House then agrees to a number of amendments supported by the government.

    The bill then moves to third reading stage, although Steve Reed notes there are only nine minutes left for debate. He says the bill is going to give mental health patients some of the "best legal protection in the world".

  7. MPs voting on amendments

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Philip Davies forced a vote on one of the amendments he has placed on the bill. It was rejected by 47 votes to eight.

    Mr Davies has now forced a vote on another of his amendments.

    Every vote takes up around 10 to 15 minutes, with business on private members' bills having to end by 2:30pm. Time is running out for today's other bills to get any kind of debate.

    MPs voting
  8. MPs voting on amendment proposed to bill

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are voting on amendment 11, which is an amendment proposed by Conservative MP Philip Davies. Result due in about 15 minutes.

  9. Bill a 'legacy' to prevent more deaths in mental health units

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Steve Reed, who introduced the bill, is speaking to wind up debate.

    He says the "driving force" behind the bill was something the coroner in the death of Olaseni Lewis said at the inquest. The coronor said that "if things don't change to address the failings...there would be more deaths of that kind".

    Mr Lewis was a mental health patient who died after being restrained by police officers.

    Mr Reed says the bill is Olaseni Lewis' "legacy" and will prevent anyone else going through what he and his family went through.

  10. 'Tragic case' shouldn't be repeated

    Mental Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow health minister Justin Madders makes a short speech to offer Labour's support to the bill. He says it's a step to making sure in the wake of the death of Olaseni Lewis that the "tragic case is not repeated".

    Justin Madders
  11. 'Sunlight is the best disinfectant'

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister Jackie Doyle-Price is explaining why the government is supportive of the bill. She pays tribute to Olaseni Lewis' family for the "dignified" way they have campaigned for justice and for change following his death.

    She says the bill will bring real change in mental health treatment and, in being more open about the use of force in mental health units abide by the principle that "sunlight is the best disinfectant".

    Jackie Doyle-Price
  12. Lib Dem MP supports bill

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    It's the turn of Lib Dem MP Norman Lamb, who supports the bill.

    He says the bill might not be perfect but says this is a staging post in changing the culture of mental health units.

    He outlines his amendments but says he won't seek a vote from MPs because he does not want to delay the bill.