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Summary

  1. Private members' bills debated in the Commons
  2. First bill to be debated is Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

Live Reporting

By Georgina Pattinson

All times stated are UK

  1. What's happened today?

    Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill

    Mark D'Arcy

    Parliamentary Correspondent

    A private member's bill to give 16 and 17-year-olds the vote now has little chance of becoming law after running out of debating time in the House of Commons, before it could be put to a vote.

    The Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement) Bill, proposed by the Labour MP Jim McMahon, was debated for a little less than an hour and a half.

    And the Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing ruled that was not long enough for her to allow it to be put to a vote.

    In theory the debate will resume on a Friday in December, but in practice the bill will be so low on the agenda, it's unlikely to get any debating time.

  2. Final debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Conor McGinn introduces the final debate of the day - on the contribution of music to the economy.

    That's where we leave our coverage of today in the Commons.

    We'll be back next week, when MPs meet on Monday and Tuesday, before a short recess.

  3. Bill runs out of time

    Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Wes Streeting, in a point of order, asks that the question be now put.

    In other words, he wants to see voting on the bill start.

    Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing says she won't allow that question to be put, because there has not been enough time to discuss this important constitutional discussion - it's only been one hour and 23 minutes - and there have not been contributions from the frontbenches.

    Jim McMahon asks what he can tell people who can't understand why debate is cut short and the deputy Speaker says he can tell them the bill will be discussed another day.

    Time runs out on private members' bill debates as Conservative MP James Cleverly speaks.

    It means that Jim McMahon's bill on votes for 16-year-olds will be resumed on 1 December.

    There are calls of "shame" from Labour MPs.

  4. Votes for 16 'a priority'

    Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Cat Smith

    Shadow voter engagement minister Cat Smith says the Conservative party is allowing 16-year-olds to join the party - and possibly vote for the next leader - but is not trusted to vote for their MP.

    Votes for 16-year-olds is clearly a priority, she says, and now is the time to follow it.

  5. Voting age 18 'around the world'

    Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Bernard Jenkin says the voting age is 18 and older in the vast majority of countries around the world.

    "The UK's voting age is in line with the norm," he says.

    The lower voting age does not guarantee a "better democracy" he says.

    Polling by YouGov in 2013 showed that 60% are against lowering the voting age, he says.

  6. Labour MP uses speech to attack government

    Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim McMahon uses his speech to attack the government, saying the government is working in the shadows, scared of having a parliamentary vote because they know they can't win.

    "I pay tribute to those members who have listened to young people," he says. Shame on those members who did not push this in their own party, he says.

    He says the prime minister is weak, the Cabinet is in a shambles, MPs are not pushing this issue - "far better to stay in position and hope that the greasy pole will be theirs to climb".

    Sit down, Labout MPs call from around him at Conservatives who want to speak, as the chamber becomes rowdier.

    "We believe the best way to run a democracy is to extend the franchise and include people," Mr McMahon says.

  7. Votes for 16 bill debated

    Representation of the People (Young People's Enfranchisement and Education) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim McMahon

    That means that the House moves on to the next bill on the list - the Representation of the People Bill.

    Labour's Jim McMahon says there seems to have been long speeches made - because the Conservatives did not want to get to discussion of this bill - a suggestion that Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing rejects.

    He says "now is the time to extend the franchise, now is the time to give 16 and 17-year-olds the right to vote".

    There are cheers from the crowded Labour benches and Eleanor Laing needs to call order, as he proceeds.

  8. Bill passed at second reading

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jackie Doyle-Price

    Health Minister Jackie Doyle-Price says treating and caring for people in a safe environment is a priority for this government.

    She sums up for the government, until interrupted amid calls for a vote on the bill.

    The bill is passed at second reading without a vote and will progress to committee stage.

  9. Bill designed 'to improve and...save lives'

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    James Cleverly

    Conservative MP James Cleverly says he thinks the bill will be seen as a tipping point, and praises Steve Reed for getting support from across the House, giving it the best chance to be enacted.

    "It is refreshing to see a bill which is quite clearly designed to improve and in many instances save lives."

  10. Body-worn cameras for police welcomed

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    James Heappey

    Conservative MP James Heappey speaks about the bill and says he also supports the wearing of body-worn cameras by police, as a way to protect the public and police.

    Labour MP Steve Reed says research shows the wearing of these body cameras reduces the likeliehood of violence by 50%.

  11. Bill will increase transparency, accountability and justice, shadow minister says

    Mental Health Units (Use of Force) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Justin Madders

    Shadow health minister Justin Madders, says he believes there is broad support for the bill and differences can be ironed out at committee stage.

    Mr Madders says Seni's case is not an isolated case, and the technique of facedown restraint is still used.

    He too raises the issue of BAME people who are disproportionately reflected in the statistics. The bill will increase transparency by collating more transparent data, he says.

    The bill will mean that officers attending a mental health unit should wear body cameras, unless there is a reason not to do. It will increase accountability, as well as protecting patients and police officers themselves, he says.

    Justice will be served in this bill too, he says, with the provision for an independent inquiry being triggered.

    "It's a step towards a model of care, rather than a model of containment," Mr Madders says.

  12. Watch: How do you repair the most famous clock tower in the world?

    The Elizabeth Tower is in desperate need of repair.

    BBC London's Riz Lateef goes behind the most famous clock face in the world to find out the extent of the damage.

    Video content

    Video caption: The Elizabeth Tower is in need of repair