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Summary

  1. MPs on Culture committee investigate ticket abuse
  2. Health questions starts in Commons
  3. Urgent question on money laundering
  4. MPs hold debate on Intellectual Property (Unjustified Threats) Bill then fuel poverty
  5. Lords start questions at 2.30pm
  6. Peers debate armed forces and Nato this afternoon

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Claire Gould

All times stated are UK

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Minister rejects claims about defence spending

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Defence Minister Earl Howe responds to the debate, saying he "rejects accusations" the government is not properly funding the armed forces. 

"We spend more than 2% of GDP [on defence] and we are pledged to invest more, year-on-year," he tells the House. 

Labour criticises defence spending 'wheezes'

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour spokesman Lord Rosser argues the government's approach is one of "simply moving existing items of expenditure around" in order to show it is spending a certain amount. 

He claims the government reached the 2% target for defence spending by including items that had not previously been, calling this an "accountancy wheeze".  

Lib Dems: Liberal values may not survive the decade

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lib Dem defence spokesperson Baroness Jolly says the liberal international order has prevailed for years and institutions arising out of it have benefited UK citizens. 

This international order is "under threat", and may not survive another decade, she warns. 

Peer names 'backsliders' on defence spending

House of Lords

Parliament

Jopling
BBC

Conservative peer and vice-president of Nato's parliamentary assembly Lord Jopling speaks of "continued uncertainty that comes from Washington". 

He says it's "been implied it's bad manners to name the backsliders" on defence spending among Nato members, but does so anyway: Belgium, Luxembourg, Spain, Slovenia and Hungary.

Anniversary remembered

Parliament tweets

'David has been empowered against Goliath' in technology battle

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Howell
HoL

"The Davids have been vastly empowered against the Goliaths everywhere," warns Lord Howell, as he describes how weaponry and technology has changed in favour of "small, agile" groups around the world.

He goes on to call for the UK to use its "underused soft power assets" in a world "transformed" by digital technology.

Are we spending on 'gold plated' military assets at the expense of the basics?

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Empey
HoL

Ulster Unionist peer Lord Empey says he doesn't feel soft power means much if the UK's military capability is neglected.

"Do we go for this gold plated equipment" at the expense of more basic needs, he asks, referring to the two new aircraft carriers that are under construction.

He says it's "ridiculous" for an island nation to have only three vessels available to patrol the English Channel on a daily basis.

Law is 'clear' on illegality of extremist videos online

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Yvette Cooper
HoC

Committee chair Yvette Cooper closes the committee with a final question to Solicitor General Robert Buckland, asking if he thinks Google is actually breaking the law by hosting material from proscribed group National Action.

Mr Buckland says he can't arrive at a "firm conclusion" on that, but that he has made the point that the law covers this area.

Ms Cooper reiterates that Google has not removed all the National Action videos from their sites despite repeated requests from government, and assurances to the Home Affairs Committee by Google that it will remove the videos.

Mr Buckland says he doesn't want to "prejudice" any potential prosecution, but that he has made his view on the law clear.

Should misogyny be recorded as hate crime?

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Labour MP Naz Shah asks if misogyny will be recognised as a hate crime nationally, following the work done by the Nottinghamshire police force.

Home Office Minister Sarah Newton says police forces which have prioritised hate crimes against women have found more women coming forward to report crimes because they understand they will be taken seriously.

She says it would probably be more helpful to talk in terms of "gender" when recording hate crimes.

Ms Shah asks if the police should be instructed to record all gender hate crimes.

Ms Newton says the government will not direct the police to prioritise certain crimes, as individual forces are best placed to decide what is needed in their local areas.

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Funding available for community projects tackling hate crime

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Committee chair Yvette Cooper presses Sarah Newton on whether the Home Office has the resources to deal with the range of threats.

Ms Cooper says there is evidence of "inadequate community prevention work" on Islamic extremism.

Ms Newton says the Home Office is flexible enough to shift resources into different areas as required.

Robert Buckland says there is a new funding scheme for community projects, distributing Home Office grants to local organisations tackling different kinds of hate crime.

Look back

Hansard tweets

Home Office learning from expert on right-wing extremism

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Stuart McDonald
HoC

SNP MP Stuart McDonald asks the witnesses if the government has enough information from experts on the activities of the extreme right in the UK.

Home Office Minister Sarah Newton says there are monitoring teams in the Home Office looking at right-wing extremism and that the department engages with academic experts working in this field.

She says the Home Office needs to learn more about how "vulnerable individuals" get drawn into extreme right-wing groups, and work is being done on this.

"Resources are matched to the level of threat," says Ms Newton, so the department can respond to emerging threats, and she cites the example of the government response to child abuse online.

Navy has too few ships, claims ex-Navy chief

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

West
BBC

Labour peer and former Navy chief Lord West of Spithead says liberalism is receding and there's a chance we could be heading into a "highly dangerous" world. 

He charges the government with "staggering complacency" when it comes to resources for defence. 

"The Royal Navy has too few ships to do what the nation expects of it," he continues. 

'Nothing being ruled out' to compel social media companies to act

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Both Solicitor General Robert Buckland and Home Office Minister Sarah Newton say nothing is being ruled out, including compelling companies through legislation, to take action against extreme content on their sites.

Mr Buckland says he is wary of emulating the laws in Germany, as he doesn't want to "give too much power" to already very powerful companies to decide on what is or isn't acceptable to be published.

He says legislation might not be "sufficiently flexible" to deal with fast moving changes in technology and in trends online.

'Incomprehensible' that government didn't take action sooner - Labour MP

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

David Winnick
HoC

Labour's David Winnick presses the witnesses on the "millions of pounds of public money" that have been paid to the social media companies to advertise government programmes.

"I find it incomprehensible" that action was not taken earlier than last week, says Mr Winnick.

"As soon as the issues were known, action was taken," says Ms Newton, of the government's decision to withdraw advertising from Google when its advertisements were seen next to extreme content on YouTube.

Ex-Army chief: US retreating from international responsibilities

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Former chief of defence staff Lord Stirrup warns of the United States' "threatened and actual retreat" from the world stage. 

He says President Trump's appeal for European countries to pay more towards Nato is "neither new nor wrong", and although the UK is meeting the minimum spend we should allocate more. 

Conservatives 'ignorant' on EU defence role - Lib Dems

Nato and security debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Fallon
BBC

Lib Dem spokesman Lord Wallace of Saltaire says international relations are going from "benign to much more unstable" and Western democracies "can no longer set the rules". 

The defence secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, looks on as the former minister tells peers "the level of ignorance in the Conservatives about the European defence co-operation is astonishing", and many behaved during the referendum campaign as if the EU "bore no relation" to Nato. 

Will government get its advertising money back from Google?

Home Affairs Committee

Select Committee

Parliament

Committee chair Yvette Cooper asks if the government has demanded its money back from the advertising it has withdrawn from Google.

Mr Buckland says discussions are ongoing, and Ms Newton says they "won't give a running commentary".

Despite the hilarity of the committee, Ms Newton goes on to say that there are "serious discussions" with Google about the government's advertising policy.