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Summary

  1. Brexit Committee takes evidence on Scotland's stance
  2. Day in Commons begins with questions to Cabinet Office
  3. It's PMQs at noon
  4. Third and final day of committee stage of Brexit bill
  5. Peers begin with oral questions
  6. Lords then turn to examine Digital Economy Bill

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge, Kate Whannel and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

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  1. The end of a historic day in the Commons

    That's all from us on a historic day at Parliament. The House of Commons voted with a majority of more than 300 to give Theresa May the power to start the process of leaving the European Union. Crucially for the government, the bill also got through the House unamended.

    The bill will now proceed to the House of Lords.

  2. Amendment would create 'incoherent' press regulation

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Minister Lord Keen of Elie says the House as debated Section 40 on "various different occasions". Amendments seeking to enact it have been tabled during a number of recent bills. He says the government acknowleges that there is a "strength of feeling" in the House on the matter.

    The government has run a consultation on enacting Section 40, and Lord Keen says the government has received 140,000 submissions. He says the government will not support tonight's amendment because it would create an "incoherent" regime, with different regulations for online and newspaper publications.

  3. Government urged to implement Leveson recommendations

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbencher Baroness Hollins is introducing the final set of amendments at committee stage. She says her amendments would have a similar effect to Section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act 2013, but apply only to online publications, not newspapers.

    Section 40 would lead to financial penalties for publications not signed up to an officially recognised press regulator, but has not yet been activated by the government.

    Currently there is one officially recognised regulator, Impress. However most major newspapers are members of IPSO, a regulator set up by the press themselves.

    Lord Prescott is among the peers who have shown up to support the measure. He says the rules were "agreed unanimously" by party leaders and passed by both houses of parliament.

    Lord Prescott
  4. Peers urge action against ticket tout 'scourge'

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are now debating a series of amendments to curb ticket touting. One amendment seeks to stop excessive numbers of tickets being bought automatically online for immediate resale, which Labour's Lord Stevenson of Balmacara calls a "scourge" of concertgoers. 

    Other amendments ban ticket resellers that aren't authorised by the event organiser and allow event organisers to apply to have secondary ticketing sites taken down.

    Conservative Lord Moynihan speaks to support the amendments. He says the reality is that for popular events many real fans "have no chance" of getting tickets at face value price in an online sale, because they're crowded out by online bots.

  5. Peers debate Ofcom regulation of online publications

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour frontbencher Lord Stevenson of Balmacara introduces an amendment asking for Ofcom to be asked to report on how it could regulate "digital publications". Ofcom as an online regulator was described as a "backstop" in the Leveson Report into press regulation.

    As it stands, published newspapers and websites do not have to be regulated, but have a choice of two regulators. There's IPSO, the industry's own regulator which most major newspapers are signed up for, and Impress, which is officially recognised but has only signed up more minor publications.

    Minister Lord Keen of Elie says Ofcom has "massive responsibilities" already, "many of which we have debated in the last week". He also warns against dividing responsibility for regulation depending on whether something was published on paper or online.

  6. Children's TV regulation 'not in interest' of sector

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Minister Lord Ashton of Hyde lets Baroness Benjamin down, the government will not be accepting the amendment. He says that the landscape of children's viewing habits is changing and that they "consume content on an increasing range of platforms and providers". He says the government wants to support the provision and plurality of children's content and are planning a fund for under-served content with children's TV a key area in that plan.

    But he says additional regulation is "not in the interest of the diverse and vibrant children's TV landscape in the UK".

    An angry Baroness Benjamin expresses her disappointment. She says that "what we need, what children need are quality UK produced programmes" through which they can "discover themselves and their world". She says she's "passionate and determined not to abandon our nation's children" and that she plans to return to the issue at a later stage.

    Baroness Benjamin
  7. Labour rebels

    Brexit Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    52 Labour MP's voted against the Article 50 bill at Third Reading, including a number of frontbenchers. 

    • Rosena Allin-Khan, Shadow Sports Minister
    • Kevin Brennan, Shadow Arts Minister
    • Lyn Brown, Shadow Home Minister
    • Ruth Cadbury, Shadow Housing Minister
    • Thangham Debonnaire, Whip
    • Vicky Foxcroft, Whip
    • Rupa Huq, Shadow Justice Minister
    • Clive Lewis, Shadow Business Secretary (Resigned)
    • Chi Onwurah, Shadow Business Minister
    • Stephen Pound, Shadow Northern Ireland Minister
    • Andy Slaughter, Shadow Housing Minister
    • Catherine West, Shadow Foreign Minister
    • Alan Whitehead, Shadow Business Minister
    • Daniel Zeichner, Shadow Transport Minister

    Rachel Maskell, Tulip Siddiq, Jo Stevens and Dawn Butler all resigned from the frontbench last week.

  8. Peers debate children's TV production

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Over in the Lords Lib Dem Baroness Benjamin is introducing an amendment that would, she says, safeguard UK produced children's TV by requiring Ofcom to consider the number of hours and scheduling of children's content on public service channels.

    Her colleague Baroness Bonham-Carter says she hopes the government won't reject the amendment because it would "break Baroness Benjamin's heart".

    Baroness Benjamin is better known as Floella Benjamin, who in a previous career was a presenter on the 1970s children's TV favourite Play School.

  9. MPs begin adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Jim McMahon now begins his debate on educational attainment in Oldham but that's where we leave our coverage of the House of Commons.

    MPs will be back tomorrow at 9:30am for questions to the Culture Secretary Karen Bradley. 

    There will also be two debates - one on Israeli settlements in the occupied Palestinian territories and the second on governance of the Football Association.

  10. Pic: Theresa May leaves the chamber

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Theresa May
  11. MPs approve bill to trigger Article 50

    Brexit Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Division result announcement

    The vote is 494 to 122 making a majority of 372.

    The bill will now wing its way to the House of Lords for their consideration.

    The second reading of the bill in the House of Lords is scheduled to take place on 20 February.

  12. Clive Lewis profile

    Clive Lewis' resignation was expected but will still be a blow for the Labour leader.

    Lewis is one of the stars of the 2015 intake. Seen by many on the left as a potential successor to Jeremy Corbyn, he quickly established himself as one of the most high profile Corbynite MPs in the shadow cabinet rising from backbencher to shadow Secretary of State in a matter of months. His resignation today will shake the Labour leader as the party continues to grapple with Britain’s exit from the European Union.

    In a interview with the Guardian back in August he said his promotion to shadow defence secretary sounded "ridiculous, a nitro glycerine turbo charged boost”. He went on to say “I've been thrust too quickly into the Shadow Cabinet, I want to be in my consistency, I want to be a constituency MP." His exit from the shadow cabinet tonight means he can do that.

    Getty
    Image caption: Getty Images
  13. MPs vote on Brexit Bill

    Brexit Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    We now come to the last vote.

    MPs are now voting to approve the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill at third reading.

    If it is approved the bill will head to the House of Lords for their consideration. 

  14. Points of Order

    Brexit Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Alex Salmond

    Before the bill moves on to its third reading vote SNP MP Alex Salmond raises a point of order.

    He says it is a disgrace that there will be no report stage or third reading.

    "What is it about this place that allows a bill of this significance to be railroaded through," he asks.

    Conservative Jacob Rees-Mogg takes a different view and makes a point of order to celebrate MPs "nobly representing the views of the British people". 

  15. Clive Lewis resigns

    Clive Lewis, Shadow Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Secretary has resigned from the Shadow Cabinet.

    In a statement Lewis said:

    “When I became the MP for Norwich South, I promised my constituents I would be ‘Norwich’s voice in Westminster, not Westminster’s voice in Norwich’. I therefore cannot, in all good conscience, vote for something I believe will ultimately harm the city I have the honour to represent, love and call home. It is therefore with a heavy heart that I have decided to resign from the shadow cabinet.

    “It has been a privilege to work with Jeremy Corbyn and be part of the shadow cabinet. I will continue to support our party and our leader from the back benches to the very best of my ability.”

  16. Bill passes committee stage without amendment

    Brexit Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have rejected the amendment on Euratom by 336 votes to 287...

    ...And that concludes the committee stage of the bill.