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Summary

  1. International Trade Committee taking evidence on trade
  2. Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt answers MPs' questions
  3. Labour MP highlights assaults on emergency NHS staff
  4. MPs continue examination of Brexit bill
  5. Lords main business is Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge and Kate Whannel

All times stated are UK

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Commons vote

An attempt to give MPs a decisive say on the terms of Brexit is defeated in a Commons vote.

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Tomorrow in the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

That's it from us tonight. MPs return tomorrow morning from 11:30am with Cabinet Office questions, followed by the weekly parliamentary set-piece of Prime Minister's Questions at noon.

MPs will then get a final chance to consider amendments to the EU withdrawal bill at Committee stage, followed by report and a vote on third reading.

SNP amendment defeated

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The SNP's amendment fails, 333 votes for the noes and 79 for the ayes, a majority of 254.

So the bill escapes its second day of committee stage unamended. The committee will sit again tomorrow afternoon.

The Commons now moves on to tonight's adjournment debate on penalties for causing death or injury while driving, introduced by Labour's Wayne David.  

Labour new clause defeated

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted against Labour's New Clause 5, by 337 votes to 281 a majority of 56.

MPs are now voting on New Clause 143, an SNP amendment that requires an assessment of the financial liability of the UK towards the EU following Brexit.

MPs begin voting

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are now voting on New Clause 5, which compels the government to publish any impact assessment of the economy after Brexit made by the Treasury since June 23rd.

MPs voting
BBC

Minister 'cannot accept' amendments

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Robin Walker
BBC

Junior Brexit Minister Robin Walker is now summing up on behalf of the government.

He proceeds to emphasise that this is a very simple bill and is not intended to be about anything but starting the process of leaving the EU, as voted for in the referendum of June 2016.

He says the government will "lay out as much detail as possible, providing that doing so does not damage our negotiating position".

He says many of the amendments in this section involve forcing the government to publish information about the effect of Brexit, which would have the result of slowing the process down. He adds that others would constrain the government in their negotiations. He says because of that he "cannot accept" any of them.

SNP MP accused of 'filibustering'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The SNP's Patrick Grady has now been speaking for more than fifty minutes. He faces a flurry of complaints about "filibustering" from Labour and Conservative members, but his remarks are ruled in order, by the chair.

He’s been able to talk for so long because of the large number of amendments tabled by his party.

Labour's Mary Creagh says she hopes the House of Lords will be able to do the job that the House of Commons hasn't had time to do at committee stage, on issues like the environment which she says has barely been mentioned so far.

Single market exit 'an enormous hit to the economy'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Patrick Grady
BBC

SNP MP Patrick Grady tells MPs that he hopes to push the SNP's new clause 43 to a vote.

This amendment requires the Prime Minister to publish an impact assessment of leaving the Customs Union (independently of decisions on the Single Market) in good time before Parliament votes on the final agreement. 

He argues that exiting the single market will mean "an enormous hit to the economy".

Amendments will produce 'a feast for lawyers'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Michael Gove argues that if these amendments are accepted Article 50 will be subject to judicial review.

He recalls his time as a minister when a school building programme was held up as a result of a "relatively small" problem with an impact assessment. 

"If you want a feast for lawyers, a festival for litigators then accept these clauses, bring in these amendments and see the tills ching."

UK 'no longer in driving seat'

UK-EU security cooperation

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat Lord Paddick reminds the House that he served as an officer in the Metropolitan Police until 2007.

In response to a point made earlier in the debate by Conservative peer Lord Wasserman that the police would overcome any obstacles placed in their way by Brexit, Lord Paddick says he thinks he's being overoptimistic, and as an ex-policeman, "wouldn't underestimate the ability to politicans to work in the opposite direction".

He says that Brexit could hurt the UK even if they manage to retain international security cooperation. "Even if the UK is allowed to stay on board, it will no-longer be in the driving seat", he says.

Michael Gove urges MPs to reject amendments

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Michael Gove
BBC

Conservative and Vote Leave campaigner Michael Gove argues that people "do want us to take back control of the money which is spent on our behalf by the EU".

He says that seeking to delay the moment when the UK eventually leaves the European Union will delay the moment when the UK can spend the additional money on the NHS.

He urges any MPs who want to see such additional funds spent on the NHS to vote down these amendments.

Reality Check: Are we giving £350m a week to Brussels?

22 April 2016

Reality Check

Boris Johnson
AFP/ BBC

The claim: "We are giving £20bn a year or £350m a week to Brussels."

Reality Check verdict: We are not giving £20bn a year or £350m a week to Brussels - Britain pays £276m a week to the EU budget because of the rebate.

Mayor of London Boris Johnson used the figure in The Sun this morning that the UK gives £350m a week to Brussels.

Read more here.

MPs debate the £350m NHS slogan

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Chuka Umunna
BBC

Labour's Chuka Umunna now speaks to his amendment which calls for the government to: "publish a report on the effect of EU withdrawal on the national finances, particularly health spending following claims in the referendum campaign that EU withdrawal would allow an additional £350 million per week to be spent on the NHS."

He quotes the Campaign Director of the Vote Leave campaign Dominic Cummings who said that the "£350m NHS argument" was necessary to win.

The Vote Leave campaign used the slogan: "We send the EU £350 million a week. Let's fund our NHS instead".

The Vote Leave campaign bus
Getty Images

Peers debate UK-EU security cooperation

House of Lords

Parliament

Armed police outside Downing Street in London
Stefan Rousseau/PA Wire

Crossbencher Baroness Prashar is introducing a debate on the EU Home Affairs Sub-Committee's report into the effect of Brexit on UK-EU security cooperation.

The committee concluded that the UK and the remaining members of the EU have a strong mutual interest in continuing to cooperate, but that the way Brexit is being planned may make that difficult.

The committee also emphasised the importance of the European Arrest Warrant, and expressed a hope that the UK can follow Norway and Iceland down the route of mirroring the EAW in bilateral extradition agreements.

IDS: Opposition trying to block Brexit

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Iain Duncan Smith asks why the opposition is placing such importance on Treasury forecasts.

He notes that the Treasury predicted that a vote to leave the EU would cause a recession by the end of 2016.

“In reality the economy continued to grow” he says.

He says he suspects that by preventing the government from triggering Article 50 until such forecasts are published, the amendment is an attempt to block Brexit.

Pennycook: Government should publish impact assessments

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Matthew Pennycook
BBC

Brexit minister Matthew Pennycook now speaks to Labour's new clause five.

This amendment requires the government to publish any recently conducted Treasury impact assessments of different trading models with the European Union. 

Mr Pennycook argues that businesses deserve to be made aware of the possible effects of Brexit.

He says impact assessments can be published without revealing the government's negotiation strategy. 

Tory rebels

Mirror politics reporter tweets:

MPs reject SNP amendment

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reject the SNP amendment by 336 votes to 88.

We now move on to the next group of amendments, which deal with impact assessments on Brexit. 

What is the SNP amendment?

House of Commons

Parliament

New clause 180 is an SNP amendment.

This amendment would ensure that the Prime Minister cannot trigger Article 50 until she has sought an undertaking from the European Council that failure to approve a deal will result in the maintenance of the UK membership of the EU on existing terms. 

One rebel counted...

Conservative MP tweets

MPs reject the amendment

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have vote to reject the new clause 110 by 326 votes to 293.

Now the Commons moves on to voting on New Clause 180.

How many rebels?

Huffington Post's executive editor, politics, tweets

MPs vote on new clause 110

Voting
BBC
MPs file out to vote. It appears several Conservative MPs (on the left of the picture) are abstaining...

Last minute persuasion?

Parliamentary reporter tweets

Abstaining?

BBC political correspondent tweets

Rebels noted

Parliamentary reporters tweet

What's being voted - and who might vote?

Sky's political editor tweets

MPs vote on new clause 110

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs vote
BBC

MPs do however vote on Labour MP Chris Leslie's new clause 110. 

This amendment states that Parliament must approve "any new treaty or relationship" following the negotiations in respect of the triggering of Article 50.  

Labour does not push its amendment

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer reiterates his earlier assertion that the government has made a concession.

However, he says, there remain a number of unanswered questions.

He says he will not push Labour's new clause one - it is therefore not put to a vote. 

Minister: Remaining a member of the EU is not an option

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Minister David Jones argues against those amendments which would require the government to reopen negotiations with the EU if parliament rejects the final draft agreement.

He says this would be a sign of weakness and lead to a worse final deal.

He tells MPs that the bill is seeking to do "one simple thing" to follow the instructions of the British people.

"Remaining a member of the European Union is not an option."

Minister responds to debate

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

David Jones
BBC

In the last backbench contribution, Conservative Andrew Tyrie says he is minded to vote against the government. 

Brexit Minister David Jones now responds to the debate after which MPs will begin voting on amendments.

He seeks to clarify what MPs will be able to vote for: "the final draft of the agreement before it is submitted to the European Parliament".

'Government is on borrowed time' warns Conservative MP

European Union bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Bob Neill
BBC

Conservative Bob Neill intervenes on Mr Raab.

He says that if there is no deal the UK could be forced to revert to "deeply damaging" WTO rules.

It would be a "scandal and betrayal" if this parliament does not get a say, he says.

He tells MPs that he might not support Opposition amendments, but expresses the hope that the House of Lords will add a similar amendment.

"The government is on borrowed time," he warns.  

MPs are 'laying elegant traps'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Dominic Raab
BBC

Conservative MP Dominic Raab says that delaying Brexit will be bad for business and frustrate the public.

He supports a final vote on the deal but warns MPs that such a vote "should not frustrate the will of the British people".

He accuses opposition MPs of "laying elegant traps" to tie up the government during its negotiations.

BreakingGovernment defeat in the Lords

Medical Supply Costs Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted in favour of the life sciences amendment by 253 votes to 208, a majority of 45 - and another government defeat in the Lords.

Proposed amendment 'not that radical'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Yvette Cooper
BBC

New clause 110 is not that radical, says Labour's Yvette Cooper.

All it does, she argues, is to put on the bill the "things the minister has said he will do".

She adds that the bill also provides clarity that there will be a vote "if there was no deal and if we were going down the WTO route".

Chris Leslie's new clause 110 requires parliament to approve "any new treaty or relationship" in advance of final agreement with the European Commission, European Parliament or European Council.

Peers voting on life sciences support

Medical Supply Costs Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are voting on amendment 3 to the bill, which would place a responsibility on the NHS for helping the life sciences sector in the UK grow, and would ensure that NHS patients would have "rapid clinical access to new clinically effective and cost-effective medicines and treatments".

The amendment has support from crossbench peers Lord Warner and Lord Patel, as well as the Liberal Democrats and Labour. 

The result is due shortly.

The House of Lords votes
BBC

What did she say?

Parliamentary reporters tweet

Former minister warns that she may vote against the government

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Anna Soubry
BBC

"I did not vote with my conscience," Conservative Anna Soubry says of her vote on the second reading of this bill.

Sounding slightly tearful, she adds that she is not sure if she voted in the best interests of her constituents.

However, she says she'll be "jiggered" if she is "not going to be true to my belief in parliamentary sovereignty". 

All we are asking, she says, is that this Parliament has a voice in the event that there is no deal. 

She warns that she may be left with no alternative but to vote against the government and support Labour MP Chris Leslie's amendment.

Chris Leslie's new clause 110 requires Parliament to approve "any new deal or treaty" following the "negotiations in respect of the triggering of Article 50".