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Summary

  1. Commons begins with Education questions
  2. Day's main business is Brexit bill consideration
  3. Peers start work at 2.30pm with questions
  4. Lords then look at Digital Economy Bill

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge and Kate Whannel

All times stated are UK

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Debate of EU bill is adjourned

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs reject the amendment 330 votes to 267 and that concludes debate of the bill for the moment.

The bill will resume later today when MPs will debate parliamentary scrutiny of any final Brexit deal. 

Labour's Ed Miliband now rises to begin his adjournment debate on HS2 in Yorkshire.

That is where our coverage ends but you can watch the debate live on BBC Parliament. 

SNP amendment rejected

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs reject the SNP amendment 332 votes to 62.

Next up is new clause 158 tabled by Plaid Cymru MPs.

This amendment requires the government to produce a report on the effect of Brexit on Welsh finances before triggering Article 50. 

MPs reject Labour amendment

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Division result announcement
BBC

MPs reject Labour's amendment 333 votes to 276.

The next amendment to be voted on is the SNP's new clause 26 which states that Article 50 can’t be triggered until a UK wide approach has been agreed by all members of the Joint Ministerial Committee. 

MPs clash over speech times

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Deputy Speaker Lindsay Hoyle (l) and Alex Salmond (r)
BBC
Deputy Speaker Lindsay Hoyle (l) and SNP MP Alex Salmond (r) argue over the time given to SNP MPs

MPs begin voting

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs begin voting
BBC

Labour pushes new clause four to a vote.

This amendment would put the role of the Joint Ministerial Committee during Brexit negotiations on a statutory footing. 

The Joint Ministerial Committee (JMC) is a body made up of representatives from the UK and devolved governments.   

Minister responds to the debate

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Robin Walker
BBC

There is a tetchy exchange between Deputy Speaker Lindsay Hoyle and the SNP's Alex Salmond who feels the SNP has not been given enough time to speak.

Brexit Minister Robin Walker notes that the Supreme Court found that the devolved legislatures do not have a veto on the UK's decision to withdraw from the EU.

He adds, however, that the ruling does not diminishes the government's commitment to work with the devolved administrations. 

He urges MPs to withdraw their amendments

Elphicke: Let government get on with Brexit

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Charlie Elphicke says the government should be allowed to "get on" with a "clean Brexit".

He argues that it would be wrong for an "important negotiation to be hamstrung" by the proposed amendments. 

Government paying 'lip service' to Good Friday Agreement

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Mark Durkan
BBC

SDLP MP Mark Durkan says no one should be "under any misapprehension" that there aren't implications for the Good Friday Agreement.

He accuses the government of paying "lip service" to the importance of the agreement..

Given that the UK government has a "duty to protect" the agreement he asks what the difficulty is in having that commitment on the face of this bill.

'Not a penny less'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Jonathan Edwards
BBC

Plaid Cymru has tabled an amendment requiring the government to produce a report on the effect of the UK's withdrawal from the EU on Welsh finances.

Plaid Cymru MP Jonathan Edwards tells MPs that Wales is a net beneficiary from the EU to the tune of £79 per head per year.

He says his party will accept "not a penny less" from the government noting that Vote Leave said Wales would not lose out from Brexit.

MPs debate implications for the Good Friday Agreement

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conor McGinn
BBC

Labour MP Conor McGinn says he respects the result of the EU vote and urges MPs to respect the result of another referendum - the Good Friday Agreement.

He supports an amendment which calls on the Prime Minister to commit to the provisions of the Good Friday Agreement including the free movement of people, goods and services on the island of Ireland. 

DUP MP Ian Paisley intervenes to point out the government has already committed to the Good Friday Agreement principles.

"Why does it need to be in this legislation?" he asks.

Conor McGinn replies that the EU referendum has created uncertainty and that leaving the EU is a constitutional change being done "without the consent of Northern Ireland".

Lords adjourns for the night

House of Lords

Parliament

house of lords clock
BBC

The House of Lords has finished the day's work on the Digital Economy Bill at Committee stage.

The House returns at 2:30pm tomorrow afternoon with questions, followed by report stage of the Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill.

Redwood: MPs pessimistic about 'exciting' Brexit process

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative John Redwood "despairs" at the pessimism of so many people about this "exciting process of recreating an independent democratic country".

He argues that ending net contributions to the EU will mean more money for the UK - including the devolved governments.

Conservative Anne Main intervenes to agree, arguing that the SNP should be welcoming the return of powers over agriculture and fisheries rather than being content to "leave it in Brussels".

Does the SNP respect the Supreme Court's decision?

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh and Shailesh Vara
BBC

Conservative MP Shailesh Vara asks if the SNP respects the decision of the Supreme Court which stated that the triggering of Article 50 did not require the consent of the Scottish Parliament. 

Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh in turn asks if the government is going to ignore the will of the Scottish Parliament.

Government needs to treat Scotland 'with respect'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh
BBC

SNP MP Tasmina Ahmed-Sheikh runs through a number of SNP amendments which seek to increase the devolved administration's involvement in the Article 50 negotiations.

This includes giving devolved parliaments "a substantive vote" on the triggering of Article 50.

The government needs to treat Scotland "seriously and with respect" she says.

MP accused of 'filibustering'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Barry Sheerman calls a point of order and accuses Conservative Mark Harper of "filibustering" the debate. 

He's been speaking for more than 20 minutes, and managed over half an hour in the debate on the first set of amendments. 

There are three hours scheduled for debate on this set of amendments.

Deputy Speaker Natascha Engel says that Mark Harper's speech is entirely in order because there are "no time limits" on individual speeches at committee stage of a bill.

Labour accused of Brexit 'delay'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Mark Harper
BBC

Conservative backbencher and former minister Mark Harper says many of the amendments being debated constitute a "veto" on Brexit. 

On Labour's amendment creating a formal role for the Joint Ministerial Committee and seeking a "consensus", he says he opposes it. 

He turns his fire on the Scottish National Party, who he says want to end the United Kingdom, and have not reconciled with Brexit. Because of that he says that "consensus is not going to be reached". 

He says that putting the JMC into statute would be a way of "delaying the process".

Labour's Ian Murray, MP for Edinburgh South, angrily intervenes to object, telling him that "the Scottish National Party aren't the entirety of Scotland" and that the amendment lets the "Scottish people into the process, not the Scottish National Party".

Ian Murray
BBC

Unhappiness from Opposition benches

Labour MP tweets

MPs debate role of the devolved nations

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Jenny Chapman
BBC

There are a few more complaints from MPs about the lack of more votes, before debate on the next group of amendments get started.

The lead amendment in this group is Labour's new clause 4 (NC4) which seeks to place the role of the Joint Ministerial Committee during Brexit negotiations on a statutory footing.

The Joint Ministerial Committee (JMC) is a body made up of representatives from the UK and devolved governments. 

Shadow Brexit minister Jenny Chapman argues that the government owes it to the people of Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland to be as accommodating as possible. 

Companies urged to carry out 'cyber audits'

Digital Economy Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers are back to work on the Digital Economy Bill. 

Conservative Lord Arbuthnot of Edrom is currently introducing an amendment on cyber security. He wants companies to carry out what he calls "cyber audits" to assess their resilience against online threats and subject themselves to "stress tests".

Threats, he says, can come from unexpected places. 

He says that the US chain store Target was hacked in 2014 by a group that got in through unsecured, internet connected air conditioners, while last year some of the biggest names on the internet were taken down by a "botnet" made up of unsecured webcams and personal video recorders.

He says that such audits are now necessary due to the "existential nature" of our relationship with technology.

Labour MP objects to lack of votes

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Chris Leslie objects to the fact that there won't be more votes on the amendments that have just been debated.

Deputy Speaker Natasha Engel explains that the clerks spent a long time looking at every single amendment in detail.

She says they came to the decision that the lead amendment would be put to a vote before moving on to the second group of amendments.

She makes clear that the vote on EU nationals will be put to a vote on Wednesday

MPs reject Labour's scrutiny amendment

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reject Labour's amendment 333 votes to 284.

There will be no more votes on this group of amendments.

MPs move on to debating amendments concerning the devolved administrations. 

Voting begins

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs voting
BBC

Minister David Jones concludes by telling the House the government will not support any of the amendments.

MPs now begin voting and the first amendment to be voted on is Labour's new clause three.

This amendment requires the government to provide parliament with reports on Brexit negotiations at least every two months. 

Back from the ball on a Brexit bus

Sky News Political Editor tweets

Minister responds to the debate

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

David Jones
BBC

Brexit Minister David Jones responds to the debate.

On parliamentary scrutiny he suggests that opposition amendments are unnecessary, noting that the Brexit Secretary David Davis has given an "almost monthly" update to parliament.

He then turns to the amendments relating to the status of EU citizens.

Securing the status of EU nationals is a foremost priority, he says, adding that without EU nationals "we would all be poorer".

However, he rejects calls for the UK to offer unilateral guarantee for EU nationals.

That, he argues, would amount to the government "failing" in its duty to achieve certainty for our own nationals abroad.   

A 'simple goodhearted' amendment

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP and (one time leader hopeful) Owen Smith speaks to his "simple, goodhearted amendment" which requires the government to set out more details as to its aspiration for a Brexit negotiation.

If Parliament is going to do its job MPs need to see the detail, he says.

'No reason not to guarantee residents' rights'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Sarah Wollaston
BBC

There is no reason not to guarantee the rights of EU nationals, says Conservative Sarah Wollaston.

Even if other countries in the EU were to be obstructive, she says it would be "inconceivable" that the prime minister would "break up families" in the UK.

"Let's make that offer. It will be nothing but good to do so." 

Transport vital to 'global Britain' vision

Brexit impact on transport

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
BBC

Labour's Lord Rosser says the UK's aviation industry is the largest in Europe, the third largest in the world and supports a million jobs around the country.

He asks the government if they plan to help keep the UK in current aviation agreements, saying that the white paper published last week is "not as clear as it might be". He also asks if UK driving licences will still be valid in the EU, as they are now.

Transport Minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon says transport is a vital part of the government's "vision for a global Britain". He says "when we leave the EU we will leave the internal market" but will want to find "sensible ways" for transport arrangements to continue.

It is, however, too early to say what those arrangements will look like, says the minister.

'Willful economic vandalism'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Stewart Hosie
BBC

SNP MP Stewart Hosie says that when people voted for Brexit they were not voting for a "hard Tory cliff edge Brexit".

He says that Brexit amounts to leaving "the largest and most successful trading block".

To do this without a "clear assessment" of the impacts, he argues, is an act of "willful economic vandalism". 

Bespoke air travel deal possible

Brexit impact on transport

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour's Lord Whitty suggests that due to the interdependence of the transport sector, and the fact that the airspace covered by the EU's single aviation market extends beyond the EU itself, makes a "bespoke" deal in that area possible.

Non-EU countries which are in the European Common Aviation Area include Norway, Iceland and the non-EU Balkan states. The ECAA allows airlines from those countries to run commercial flights between any two ECAA countries.

Fuller: Angela Merkel to blame for lack of deal on residents' rights

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Richard Fuller
BBC

Conservative Richard Fuller argues that the government cannot guarantee rights for EU nationals without considering UK nationals living in the EU.

He says that British citizens living in the EU would feel vulnerable if the government did not seek a deal guaranteeing their rights.   

He tells MPs that he understands it is the German Chancellor Angela Merkel who has said no to an early deal on residence rights. 

There have been speeches objecting to President Trump, he notes, but no talk of pressurising the German government. 

Bringing together the 52% and 48%

European Union bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Lib Dem Alistair Carmichael tells MPs that the country faces a challenge as to how to bring together "the 52% and 48%".

One way of achieving this, he argues, would be to guarantee the residence rights of EU nationals.

Peers debate Brexit effect on transport

House of Lords

Parliament

Planes at Gatwick airport
Reuters

The House is now taking part in a short debate on the effect of Brexit on transport policy.

Lib Dem Baroness Randerson is starting the debate by raising concerns about the European single market in aviation. 

The single market means air carriers don't have to just fly to and from their country of origin; they can fly between any two destinations within the EU.

This has allowed budget carriers like EasyJet and Ryanair to grow far beyond their own home markets.

Baroness Randerson says she thinks the UK's short-haul airlines want the future to look "as much like the present as possible" because "the EU has in general allowed their business to expand and thrive".

Why is the Speaker's chair empty?

House of Commons

Parliament

Eleanor Laing
BBC

When the debate began, the Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing vacated the Speaker's chair.

She did this because MPs are currently in "a committee of the whole House".

Normally the committee stage takes place away from the main chamber; however, for those bills that are considered to be of ethical or constitutional importance debates take place in the main chamber. 

Watch out tomorrow

Political editor, The Guardian, tweets

When will MPs vote tonight?

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs are currently debating the first group of amendments which deals with parliamentary scrutiny and the rights of EU citizens in the UK. 

The debate should conclude at 9pm when MPs will vote on some - but not all - of the amendments.

The "lead amendment" for the group, Labour's clause calling for regular reports on negotiation, will be put to the House.

Some amendments, such as Harriet Harman's clause guaranteeing residence rights for EU nationals, will be put to a vote on Wednesday.

Whether votes take place on other amendments in this group is left to the discretion of the deputy speakers who take into account which amendments have been most commented on.

There will then be a three hour debate on the next group of amendments which focus on the the role of the devolved administrations.

Votes on the amendments in this group will take place at approximately midnight. 

Residency concerns keeping constituents 'awake at night'

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Heidi Allen
BBC

Conservative Heidi Allen says her constituency is "bursting full of EU citizens" and that the matter of residency is keeping constituents "awake at night".

She says that she is the daughter of a German woman. On some occasions her father would be quite please to see her mother sent back, she jokingly adds.

Conservative Jacob Rees-Mogg intervenes to argue that the proposed Great Repeal Bill will ensure that EU nationals will continue to have the right to reside. 

Heidi Allen suggests that people's perception of the law is more important. 

Redwood: Nothing will change unless Parliament wants to change it

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Chris Leslie also worries about whether the UK will be able to continue participating in the European Health Insurance Card scheme which allows card holders to access state-provided healthcare on temporary stays at no cost or a reduced cost.

What will happen when our constituents go abroad? Mr Leslie asks.

Conservative John Redwood intervenes to argue that all existing EU laws will be transferred into British law.

Nothing will change legally unless this parliament wants to change it, he says.

Labour MP calls for reports on the impact of Brexit

European Union Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Chris Leslie
BBC

Labour's Chris Leslie, who now speaks, has tabled a number of amendments to the bill.

He begins by lamenting the amount of time MPs have been given to debate the bill and says that this makes it more important that the House of Lords does "due diligence".

His amendments call for the government to provide reports on the impact of Brexit on a number of areas including the UK's membership Europol and UK financial services sector.

He notes that some banks are already planning for job losses.

DUP MP Ian Paisley accuses him of "talking down" the City of London. Companies will chose London every time, he says.