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Summary

  1. Questions to Attorney General and Women and Equalities minister
  2. Statement on Heathrow follows, and Business statement comes next
  3. David Davis then outlines Brexit white paper
  4. Debate on Armed Forces Covenant
  5. In Lords, after questions at 11am peers examine Digital Economy Bill

Live Reporting

By Aiden James, Kate Whannel and Gary Connor

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's it from the House of Lords for this evening.

    Peers will be back from 10am on Friday to debate private members' bills, beginning with Labour peer Lord Hunt of Kings Heath's bill to regulate the health and social care professions.

    Before that, the House of Commons will sit from 9:30am, also to debate private members' bills.

  2. Lib Dem calls for copyright 'loophole' to be closed

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Clement-Jones

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Clement-Jones welcomes a government decision to close a "loophole" which allowed companies to stream the programmes of public service broadcasters (PSBs) online.

    These online providers can "monetise" this content through the use of their own advertising, while the traditional broadcasters are denied advertising revenue, he says.

    In 2015, the government decided to repeal Section 73 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1998 and held a consultation on its proposals last year.

    Section 73 allows retransmission of the PSBs' core channels (all BBC Channels, ITV1, and Channel 4 and 5’s core channels) via cable, exempt from copyright fees.

    Lord Clement-Jones calls for it to be repealed "without delay".

    An additional amendment, proposed by Labour, would "require all payments received by the original broadcaster for re-transmission of their material by cable to be reinvested in original British production".

  3. Labour calls for 'independence' of the BBFC to be confirmed

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ashton of Hyde

    Debate on the Digital Economy Bill continues, as Culture Media and Sport Minister Lord Ashton of Hyde rises to oppose a Labour amendment that would set out the independence of the British Board of Film Classification.

    He argues that age-verification of online material would "one role that the BBFC carries out alongside its other independent roles".

    In addition, the bill sets out that the secretary of state "should have a role" in setting out the role of the regulator, he adds.

  4. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And that ends the day in the House of Commons.

    Tomorrow is a private members’ bill day, with MPs debating proposed legislation on parking places, broadcasting and child poverty.

    Business kicks off at 9:30am.

  5. Colostomy irrigation take up is low - minister

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Mowat

    Health Minister David Mowat acknowledge that uptake of colostomy irrigation for people with bowel issues is low.

    He estimates that only 5% of people who could use it, do. 

    The benefits of colostomy irrigation, he says, include giving the individual control over the process and reducing the need for drugs.

    However, he acknowledges that the process can be time consuming, which might not suit everyone.

    He adds the hope that debates like this one will help to raise awareness.  

  6. 'Safety responsibilities' and social media

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The current group of amendments include one from Labour and the Lib Dems to require sex education lessons to cover the "risks" of internet porn.

    Another would place "safety responsibilities" on social media sites.

    Operators of social media sites would be required to "inform the police if they become aware of any threat on its internet site to physically harm an individual".

    They would also be required to "remove any posts made on its internet site that are deemed to be violent or that could incite violence".

  7. Taking back control

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Why do I irrigate myself? Glyn Davies asks.

    He says it is the same reason he voted to leave.

    "The answer is to take back control."

    He says his aim in tabling this debate is to raise awareness of colostomy irrigation for people suffering from bowel problems. 

  8. Debate on colostomy irrigation debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Glyn Davies

    We now come to the final item of business - an adjournment debate on colostomy irrigation awareness.

    Conservative MP Glyn Davies suggests that the subject is "not often debated in Parliament" but says it is important to him personally.

    He tells MPs that he had bowel cancer but having colostomy irrigation gave him the freedom to live an active life.

    "I didn't want it," he says "but the alternative was a far less attractive prospect."

  9. Government has 'no plans to scrap family accommodation'

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Lancaster

    Defence Minister Mark Lancaster is not left with much time to speak but touches specifically on two areas.

    On health, he says the government is working to develop a "personal commission for veterans" model to ensure they get the help they need.

    On housing, he says the government is putting together a new accommodation model and seeks to assure MPs that there no plans to "scrap family accommodation".

  10. Covenant 'a moral obligation'

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nia Griffith

    Shadow defence secreatry Nia Griffith says there is difficulty in providing services for the armed forces when public bodies are under strain "as they face cutbacks".

    She says the Armed Forces Covenant is "a moral obligation" to society to ensure that forces are "honoured for their service".

    It is also essential to improving retention rates, she adds.

  11. Oswald: Spend Trident money on veterans

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP's Armed Forces and Veterans Spokeswoman Kirsten Oswald tells MPs that half of all army recruits left school with the literacy and numeracy skills of an eleven-year-old.

    She says there needs to be a focus on transferable skills.

    She also suggests that money spent on Trident could be redirected to supporting personnel and veterans.

  12. Debate over regulator's powers over 'prohibited material'

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The bill would give the age-verification regulator power to take action if an internet service provider makes "prohibited material available on the internet to persons in the United Kingdom".

    This would include, for example, material that would be refused a BBFC certificate if made available offline.

    A Labour and Lib Dem amendment would remove this requirement from the bill.

    Crossbencher the Earl of Erroll proposes that a broad definition of pornography as material likely to cause sexual arousal, would provide better protection in the bill, rather than there being a debate about "prohibited material".

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Benjamin opposes the amendment on the grounds of child protection and speaks against "the wholesale removal of prohibited material" from the provisions of the bill.

    Culture Minister Lord Ashton of Hyde says ministers "may have unintentionally extended the powers of the regulator too far" and offers to discuss the matter further with the opposition.

    For Labour, Baroness Jones says that the aim of the amendment removing the reference "prohibited material" was motivated by a hope that ministers would offer "a definition to replace" it.

  13. 'This has to stop'

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Committee chair Julian Lewis suggests that if lawyers like Phil Shiner had been around during World War II, soldiers would not have fought "with the valour that they did".

    He regrets that soldiers have to "not only face the violence of the enemy" but also "the manipulations of a blind justice system".

    "This is totally untenable and it has to stop."

  14. Returning to civilian life 'like kicking a habit'

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tom Tugendhat

    Conservative MP Tom Tugendhat likens his experience in the army to taking a drug - "it was so electric to be challenged in everything you do - psychically, mentally and morally".

    He compares the challenge of returning to civilian life to "kicking a habit".

    He accuses the government of not doing enough to protect members of the armed forces from "charlatans and liars" such as Phil Shiner.

    Lawyer Phil Shiner has today been struck off after admitted to acting recklessly by publicly claiming UK troops unlawfully killed, tortured and mistreated Iraqis. 

  15. Army qualifications not recognised in 'civvy street'

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Gordon Marsden

    Labour's Gordon Marsden notes that there is low satisfaction with the training and education available in relation to gaining civilian accreditation.

    He says many leave with qualifications that are not understood "in civvy street".

    He adds that this is a particular problem when employers use automatic software to search for recognised qualifications. 

  16. Northern Ireland 'struggles' with covenant

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    UUP MP Danny Kinahan tells the House that Northern Ireland struggles because the structures for delivering the military covenant are not in place.

    He says that the devolved assembly at Stormont does not see the covenant as its responsibility.

    He adds that "one side" sees all military forces as part of the "imperial British side".

  17. MP 'astonished' at veterans' difficulties

    Armed Forces Covenant debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Martin Docherty-Hughes is "astonished" to see the difficulties faced by veterans when accessing medical care.

    He also expresses concern about the problems in providing personnel with accommodation.

    He suggests that it would help if the government not only built more social housing "but stop selling it".

  18. Constructive discussions - minister

    Digital Economy Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ashton of Hyde

    The minister, Lord Ashton of Hyde, says that the government's policy aims to capture all porn sites, wherever they are based.

    Responding directly to Lord Morrow, he admits that there will be cases where it is difficult to enforce the financial penalty, however constructive discussions with providers have already taken place.

    We believe that dealing with the largest of these providers will be a great step at reducing access by children, he tells peers.