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Summary

  1. Brexit Committee questions Gibraltar's chief minister and deputy
  2. Day begins with Wales questions, then it's PMQs
  3. Two Opposition day debates on prisons and school funding
  4. Peers meet for questions at 3pm
  5. Next is Higher Education and Research Bill at committee stage

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Aiden James and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

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  1. House up

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords adjourns

    After ploughing through a long list of amendments, peers reach their target for the day and the House adjourns.

    Peers will be back tomorrow from 11am to put questions to ministers and to hold a series of debates on topics including the UK's post-Brexit relationship with the United States.

    Before that, the House of Commons will sit from 9:30am, and at around 10:30am we expect to find out the timetable for Parliament's consideration of the Article 50 bill.

  2. Minister questions requirement to 'ensure' free speech

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Higher education spokesman Viscount Younger of Leckie says he is "sympathetic" to the principles of the amendment on free speech.

    However, he argues that adding a requirement to "ensure" freedom of speech could place "a disproportionate burden on providers" and could "override other considerations, such as the security of attendees at an event".

    He also tells peers that "there is no place whatsoever for hate speech" or for "anyone trying to incite violence".

    The final group of amendments begins with one which crossbencher Baroness Brown of Cambridge says she wishes to move "as quickly as possible", given how late it is.

    She asks ministers if there is a way that research institutions can obtain their own degree-awarding powers.

  3. Freedom of speech on campus

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The next amendment finds Labour's Lord Stevenson and crossbencher Baroness Deech on the same side.

    Both have put their names to an amendment: "All registered English higher education providers must ensure that their students, staff and invited speakers are able to practise freedom of speech in the provider’s premises, forums and events on all matters not specifically prohibited by law.”

    Baroness Deech has also tabled an amendment requiring "measures to prevent unlawful speech by staff, students and invited speakers".

    She says the amendments intend to "demarcate the line between lawful freedom of speech and unlawful freedom of speech".

    "The practice of censorship is spreading, by both student unions and universities," she claims, criticising "safe space" policies among other things.

  4. 'Universities are not being singled out' - Goldie

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Goldie replies for the government, saying that universities "are not being singled out" as the Prevent duty applies to other institutions such as schools and hospitals.

    "What the Prevent duty does not do is undermine free speech on campus," she claims.

    She calls on Labour's Lord Stevenson to withdraw the amendment.

    He does so, saying this was a "probing amendment" intended to provoke debate on the Prevent duty.

    Baroness Goldie tells him that "we welcome discussion" about how Prevent is operating "but blanket opposition we find unhelpful".

    There is a change of topic next, as peers debate an amendment which would make it an offence to offer services helping students to cheat, such as doing their work for them.

  5. 'Universities are targeted by extremist activists' says crossbench peer

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Deech

    Crossbencher Baroness Deech, who was a law professor at Gresham College and principal of St Anne’s College, Oxford, disagrees with her fellow peers and defends the counter-terrorism strategy.

    "The universities are not doing their duty," she argues, adding that "Jihadi John was a university graduate" as was one of the killers of Lee Rigby.

    "Universities are targeted by extremist activists from Islamist and far right groups," Baroness Deech tells the House.

    Mohammed Emwazi, the British jihadist who featured in beheading videos by so-called Islamic State, became known as "Jihadi John". He was widely reported to have attended the University of Westminster, though information about him is disputed.

  6. Prevent strategy and freedom of speech

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers debate an amendment which would mean the government's counter-terrorism duty known as Prevent would not apply to higher education institutions.

    Designed to stop people from becoming radicalised and joining terrorist groups, the Prevent strategy was updated by the coalition government in 2011.  

    Labour spokesman Lord Stevenson says: "Our higher educations institutions... should provide a space for the free and frank exchange of ideas."

    Staff would still have a responsibility to co-operate with the police to prevent terrorism and criminality, he argues, adding: "This amendment would remove a heavy-handed structure designed to restrict lawful speech."

    Lib Dem peer Baroness Garden also backs the amendment, arguing: "Freedom of speech should be an essential part of the university experience."

  7. Peer suggests government is putting off international students

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hannay

    Crossbencher Lord Hannay says he accepts action to "close down the dodgy language schools" was "necessary".

    But having solved that problem, the government continues to use language that puts off international students, he argues.

    Nevertheless, he withdraws the amendment. 

  8. Government spokesman: 'The UK does welcome students'

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour spokesman Lord Stevenson backs the amendment and suggests that Lord Willetts might realise that his argument was not the strongest one, "when he comes to his senses, if ever".

    Higher education spokesman Viscount Younger of Leckie asks peers to recall that the government cracked down on international students to combat "abuse, which was then rife".

    He insists that "the UK does welcome students", with visa applications up.

    He argues that tier two work visas allow people into the UK to work for a limited time, after which they are expected to leave - and such people would count as economic migrants. That is similar to the requirements on international students, he suggests.

  9. Crossbencher says ministers are scoring 'an own goal'

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The amendment to remove students from UK migration statistics has Labour, Liberal Democrat, crossbench and backbench Conservative support. 

    Crossbencher Lord Rees of Ludlow says he hopes ministers will realise that it is "an own goal to sustain this policy".

    Labour peer Lord Judd also backs it, telling the House: "The world is totally interdependent."

    After Brexit, the UK will be aware of this interdependence "more acutely than ever", he adds.

    However, Conservative peer Lord Willetts adopts a now well-known phrase: "Take back control."

    He says that the way migration statistics are recorded should not be "determined by the United Nations" and should be determined by the UK.

  10. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons clock

    And there the day in the House of Commons ends.

    MPs are back tomorrow for questions to the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, David Davis.

    Also, Leader of the House David Lidington will make a business statement, when he is expected to set out the timetable for debating legislation triggering Article 50 to begin the UK's departure from the EU.

    Business kicks off at 9:30am.

  11. Peers call for students to be removed from migration statistics

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Patten of Barnes
    Image caption: Former minister Lord Patten attacks "our obsession with an immigration target"

    Lord Hannay of Chiswick, a former ambassador and pro-chancellor of Birmingham University, speaks in support of an amendment which would end the classification of overseas students as economic migrants.

    The aim is to attract overseas students, he says, arguing that "this is much more than just a statistical issue".

    Lord Hannay wonders why a government "under pressure" to cut immigration would be "artificially boosting" the net migration figures by including international students.

    Also putting his name to the amendment is Conservative peer Lord Patten of Barnes, a former cabinet minister and ex-governor of Hong Kong, who insists: "People understand the difference between a student and an immigrant."

    "Why do we behave so foolishly?" he asks. "Because of our obsession with an immigration target."

  12. Minister 'not trying to make excuses'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Lancaster

    Defence Minister Mark Lancaster responds to the debate and encourages Lee Bagley to submit a complaint through the independent service complaints ombudsman. 

    He notes that Mr Bagley received his injuries at a "particularly tough time" for the army when action in Afghanistan was resulting in a high number of casualties.

    He also notes that Mr Bagley was off duty when the injuries were sustained.

    "This is not trying to make excuses," he says. "These are the facts."

    Concluding, he expresses sympathies to Mr Bagley and says service personnel should be assured that those wounded, injured or sick will receive specialised support. 

  13. Bailey: Soldiers have the right to the best possible care

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "Our soldiers have the right to expect the best possible care," says Adrian Bailey.

    He says that Lee Bagley's experience should not be repeated.

    The Labour MP notes that the army has "a full volume of regulations" designed to deliver the best possible medical support and asks how Lee Bagley did not get the support he needed.

    He expresses the hope that the regulations will be implemented in future.

  14. Spokeswoman rejects amendments - and struggles with 'civil service writing'

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Goldie

    Government spokeswoman Baroness Goldie says the system of student loans is "working well" - a point also made by Tory peer and former Universities Minister Lord Willetts.

    Lifting the cap on student loans was "lifting the cap on aspiration", she claims.

    Restoring maintenance grants, which have been replaced by loans, would reduce the amount of "upfront support" available to the least well-off, Baroness Goldie argues.

    She also claims that restoring grants would incur considerable cost, as would linking the earning threshold for repayments to CPI inflation.

    At one point, she pauses, then says: "Sorry, I can't read this writing that the civil service produced."

  15. Amendments on student loans

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers move on to debate a Liberal Democrat amendment to link the earnings threshold for repayment of student loans to consumer prices.

    They also debate two Labour amendments as part of the same group. The first would revoke government changes to student support and restore maintenance grants.

    The second Labour amendment would require the Financial Conduct Authority to regulate student loans.

  16. Adjournment debate begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Adrian Bailey

    Labour MP Adrian Bailey now introduces his adjournment debate on Rifleman Lee Bagley and the Ministry of Defence's duty of care.

    Rifleman Lee Bagley received injuries after being attacked on a night out following training in the Brecons in 2010.

    Mr Bagley returned to camp but received no medical checks until he complained of pain and swelling in his right leg.

    After delays, inconclusive appointments and no dedicated support, Mr Bagley had his right leg amputated in 2012.

  17. MPs reject schools funding motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs reject Labour's motion by 285 votes to 178.

    The government's amendment, which welcomes the proposals set out in the national funding formula, is agreed to without a vote.

  18. Government says refugee support is 'already addressed'

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government higher education spokesman Viscount Younger of Leckie says support for people with leave to remain in the UK is "already addressed within the student support regulations".

    He goes on to say that the amendment also offers support to "failed asylum seekers".

    However, Labour's Lord Stevenson argues that the amendment covers people who have not been granted asylum but a different form of leave to remain, such as "humanitarian protection".

    He suggests that the Home Office could provide more information to the supporters of the proposal, but withdraws the amendment for now.

  19. MPs begin voting on schools funding motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate concludes and voting begins.

    The Labour motion states:

    Quote Message: That this House regrets the impact of school funding cuts on the ability of children to reach their full potential; and calls on the government to ensure that all schools have the funding that they need to provide an excellent education for every child."