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Summary

  1. BEIS Committee investigating corporate governance
  2. Treasury Committee looking at future relationship with EU
  3. Justice questions start day; then statement on Article 50
  4. Main business of day is Wales Bill consideration of Lords' amendments
  5. MPs discussion motion on Charter for Budget Responsibility
  6. Peers are examining the HS2 bill
  7. Lords will examine orders and regulations later

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Aiden James and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

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  1. House adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Despite a hostile reception from some opposition peers, the regulations pass unopposed and the House adjourns.

    It sits again from 3pm on Wednesday, when peers will question ministers and then debate the Higher Education and Research Bill and the Commonwealth Development Corporation Bill.

    Before that, the Commons sits from 11:30am, with Prime Minister's Questions at noon.

  2. Minister says Tories have 'moved on' from 'hostile' trade union laws

    Important Public Services Regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Prior

    Business Minister Lord Prior replies to the debate after some strident Labour criticism. He jokes that he found "a nearly empty chamber" for this debate and thought that he would "get away more easily than I have".

    He denies that the Conservatives are trying to please their party faithful by seeking to "bring in some hostile trade union legislation" and claims: "We have moved on as a party now... We are more enlightened."

    He says the 40% threshold is "stringent" but is "well-defined". In the NHS it applies only to workers "looking after people who are particularly vulnerable".

    Overall, he says he believes the regulations are fair.

  3. Former union officials attack regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Monks

    Labour peer Lord Monks, a former TUC general secretary, says the regulations will make industrial action ballots in some public services "very difficult for the unions to carry through without legal challenge".

    For example, a teacher of GCSEs is deemed to work in an important public service but one who teaches A level is not but, Lord Monks argues, many will teach both.

    Another former union official, Labour peer Lord Whitty, describes the opt in requirements for political funds as "a major constitutional outrage".

    This "hugely partisan measure" is designed to hit Labour's finances, he says.

  4. Lib Dem says Tories won 2015 election with support of 'less than 24%'

    Important Public Services Regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat spokesman Lord Foster of Bath picks apart the regulations, which do not apply to all workers in a given sector.

    For example, the 40% threshold for the education sector applies to "teachers and headteachers but not, one assumes, caretakers, even though they are very important to the running of our schools".

    He says the government has listened on this subject of "ancillary workers" and welcomes this.

    He says a poll showed "only 37% of the public supported limits on the rights of train drivers to strike" while "only 35% supported limits on teachers".

    He argues: "Imposing a 40% threshold is a stringent limit. It is not a proportionate limit."

    And Lord Foster adds that the Conservatives won the 2015 election with "the support of less than 24% of registered voters".

  5. Regulations on strike action in 'important public services'

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Finally today, the House considers regulations defining "important public services" under the Trade Union Act 2016.

    The act requires a 50% turnout of those eligible to vote in order for a strike ballot to be valid. It further requires at least 40% to vote in favour in specified "important public services".

    Business Minister Lord Prior says the government does not want to restrict trade union rights but to ensure that "strikes can only happen after a clear, positive decision by those entitled to vote".

    Today's regulations apply to border security, education, fire services, health and transport.

    Lord Prior says these areas have shown "the most compelling evidence of the impact of strike action".

    The House is also considering a regulation to require trade union members to opt in to a union's political fund, rather than being automatically enrolled and having to opt out.

  6. Parties welcome gender pay gap regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017 will require employers with over 250 employees to analyse and report on the gender pay gap in their organisation annually.

    The Liberal Democrats' equalities spokeswoman, Baroness Burt of Solihull, claims the policy is the legacy of her party's coalition with the Conservatives from 2010 to 2015. She thanks the Conservatives for adopting Lib Dem policy.

    Labour spokeswoman Baroness Gale also welcomes the regulations but says the gender pay gap "is still at 18%".

    For the government, Baroness Vere of Norbiton tells peers that "the Conservatives have raised a million people out of income tax altogether" and helped the low paid.

    But she adds: "It's not acceptable for the gender pay gap exists in this day and age."

  7. 'If bats can fly, why do they need bridges?'

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Bat

    "If bats can fly, why do they need bridges?"

    No, not a philosophical conundrum but a question from Labour's Lord Snape about "bat bridges", wire mesh and net bridges designed to echo bat radar and guide them across a road in safety.

    After the amendment on protected species, report stage of the bill concludes.

    Peers now consider the Bank of England and Financial Services (Consequential Amendments) Regulations 2017 and the Equality Act 2010 (Gender Pay Gap Information) Regulations 2017.

    Bat bridge
    Image caption: Wire mesh and netting bridges have been used above major roads but critics say they are ineffective
  8. HS2 and protected species

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Badger

    Labour peer Lord Snape's amendment would impose "a duty to take reasonable and cost effective steps to deal appropriately with protected species".

    Lord Snape says he is concerned, given a cull of badgers in a bid to halt bovine TB, that there is a risk of the displaced animals "falling under the guns of the Department for Food and Rural Affairs".

    That would not be the best example of "joined-up government", he jokes.

    He also professed to be "a bit of an expert on great crested newts", though he confesses: "I've never seen one."

    His knowledge comes from serving on a number of hybrid bill committees in which concern for newts was expressed, he explains.

  9. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    House of Commons clock

    That wraps up the day in the House of Commons.

    MPs will be back tomorrow at 11:30am for questions to the secretary of state for Wales, followed by Prime Minister's Questions at noon.

  10. Blackwood: Clinicians not politicians should make the decision

    Stem cell transplants debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Nicola Blackwood

    Health Minister Nicola Blackwood tells MPs that second transplants are still available where the grafting process has failed.

    She says the decisions on offering stem cell transplants are reached based on clinical evidence and argues that, as a politician, she cannot make the decision.

    She adds that the government is focusing its efforts on "improving patient care" and "driving forward research".

  11. Peer's worries about West Coast Main Line

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Virgin train

    Labour's Lord Berkeley introduces an amendment which, he says, aims to "keep West Coast Main Line trains running into Euston while HS2 is being constructed".

    The amendment calls for an explanation of how "at least four tracks serving the West Coast Main Line trains in and out of Euston station would remain open at all times".

    Transport Minister Lord Ahmad insists that services on the West Coast Main Line will be maintained - but Lord Berkeley says: "I remain worried."

    The West Coast Main Line links London and Scotland, with trains calling at Birmingham, Liverpool and Manchester.

  12. Euston amendment defeated

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Randerson's amendment on the Euston area of London falls.

    Peers reject it by 161 votes to 63.

  13. Division over Euston station 'disruption'

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House divides on Baroness Randerson's amendment requiring contractors to outline the number of lorries delivering to or from the HS2 development site in Euston, at least three months in advance.

    The amendment would also require at least 50% of excavated material to be transported by rail, rather than by road.

  14. Minister: Plans 'must be agreed' by local authorities

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ahmad

    Lord Ahmad responds to Baroness Randerson's amendment by saying there is no difference of opinion in the "intent" of HS2, amongst peers. 

    Local plans "must be agreed" by the local authorities, he says. 

    He urges Baroness Randerson to withdraw her amendment.

  15. Adjournment debate on stem cells begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Tami

    We now come to the last item of business of the day an adjournment debate on stem cell transplants. 

    The debate is tabled by Labour MP Mark Tami who tells the House that his elder son received stem cell treatment.

    He tells MPs a "death sentence" was effectively handed to a group of patients when the Department for Health announced that if would not fund second stem cell transplants.

    He urges the minister to intervene to ensure that every patient who needs a transplant can get one.

  16. Lib Dem peer: Euston will 'suffer a decade of disruption' from HS2

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem peer Baroness Randerson is introducing an amendment concerning the Euston area. 

    The amendment would require contractors to outline the number of lorries delivering to or from the HS2 development site in Euston, at least three months in advance.

    "The Euston area will suffer a decade of disruption", she says. 

  17. Govt: We are seeking to 'work constructively' on HS2

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ahmad tells peers that the last meeting on this amendment took place "only a few hours ago".

    The minister says the amendment "won't affect" the existing 'Congestion Charge' in London, a concern raised by Baroness Randerson.

    "We are seeking to work constructively" with local authorities and local groups on HS2, he says. 

  18. Peers seeks further assurances

    High Speed Rail Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Randerson

    LibDem peers Baroness Randerson says the government amendments "do not go the whole way" in addressing the concerns of the areas affected by traffic regulations. 

    Labour peer Lord Berkeley remarks that more emphasis on the environmental impact of HS2 for local authorities, needs to be addressed.