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Summary

  1. International Trade Committee is taking evidence on UK trade options post 2019
  2. Culture, Media and Sport Committee questions proposed BBC Board chair
  3. Treasury questions kicks off day
  4. Two statements: the first on Northern Ireland, the second on Brexit
  5. Opposition day debate on rural economy and Brexit; then on DWP policies
  6. Peers listen to repeat of statements on NI and Brexit
  7. Lords debate Neighbourhood Planning Bill later

Live Reporting

By Aiden James, Kate Whannel and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

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  1. Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Clock

    Lord Bourne concludes his response by thanking peers for their positive engagement.

    And the House adjourns.

    Peers will be back tomorrow at 3pm for oral questions followed by consideration of Commons amendments to the Policing and Crime Bill.

  2. Bill 'not a silver bullet'

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth

    Minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth tells peers that he "accepts the bill is not a silver bullet".

    However he believes it will go some way to promoting housing and supporting local empowerment.

    During the course of the debate a number of peers have asked when the government's white paper on housing will be published. 

    He tells the House that it should be ready before report stage of this bill.

    He adds that it is "almost inevitable" this will result in legislation.

  3. Government housing policy made 'on the hoof'

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Beecham says the government's record on housing has been "an abysmal failure" with policies made "on the hoof".

    He agrees with Lord Porter that this bill won't solve housing problems. "Maybe the next one will," he suggests.

    On neighbourhood plans, he reiterates concerns that they could become a conduit for nimbyism.

    He also notes that local communities need support in producing neighbourhood plans and urges the government to "back up its aspirations with resourcing". 

  4. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And that's the end of a very busy day in the House of Commons.

    MPs meet again tomorrow from 11:30am for Scotland Office questions.

    At noon, Theresa May faces the Commons for Prime Minister's Questions for the first time since her major Brexit speech.

    The Brexit theme continues later, as the House will hold a debate on "exiting the EU and security, law enforcement and criminal justice".

    Meanwhile, peers continue their debate tonight on the Neighbourhood Planning Bill.

  5. Minister: Disabled people have the right to expect toilet facilities

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Gavin Barwell

    Communities and Local Government Minister Gavin Barwell notes that Jonathan Reynolds thanked MPs for staying for his adjournment debate.

    "I should point out that I have no choice but to be here," the minister jokes, but adds that it is a "great privilege" to reply to the debate.

    Mr Barwell says he has experience of the problems Mr Reynolds has highlighted, having cared for his late father, who had Alzheimer's disease.

    He says disabled people have the right to expect toilet facilities to be available when they leave the house.

    The minister also says that businesses must make "reasonable adjustments" if disabled employees or potential customers would otherwise be at "major disadvantage".

  6. Better promotion of neighbourhood plans needed - Lord Shipley

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Shipley

    Lib Dem Lord Shipley believes there needs to be a greater promotion of neighbourhood plans in urban areas.

    This matters, he says. If neighbourhood plans are to be the future, he argues, the structures in non-parish areas need to be stronger than "the ones we currently have".

  7. Debate on community disabled toilet facilities begins

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jonathan Reynolds

    The final Commons business today is the adjournment debate.

    Labour's Jonathan Reynolds opens a short debate on community toilet facilities for people with disabilities.

    Mr Reynolds wants more businesses to offer accessible toilet facilities, likening such a move to requirements that building provide disabled access, which has been resisted in the past.

    The MP says he hopes that, "in years to come, no-one is turned away from any premises in their search for an accessible toilet". 

  8. 'Charters of nimbyism'

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Bishop of York

    The Archbishop of York says he supports the bill, but wonders if local referendums on neighbourhood plans would become "charters of nimbyism".

    "I hope not", he says. 

  9. Government amendment passed

    Universal credit and Jobcentre closures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Commons division result

    MPs agree the government's amendment by 268 votes to 81.

    This has the effect of transforming the SNP's motion criticising Universal Credit and Jobcentre closures into one praising the government's policy.

  10. Peer proposes incentives for the elderly to downsize

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Greengross

    Crossbencher Baroness Greengross worries that the bill does not do enough to promote accessible housing for older people and those with disabilities.

    She says there is a huge gap between need and provision of specialist housing.

    She urges the government to explore the possibility of placing a duty on local authorities to plan for this type of housing.

    She also suggests incentives should be introduced to encourage older people to downsize.

  11. Lib Dem peer calls for more parish councils

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Taylor of Goss Moor

    Lib Dem Lord Taylor of Goss Moor suggests that if the government wants to see more neighbourhood plans it should set up more parish councils.

    He argues that parish councils create a "very local" form of direct democracy that make it easier to set up neighbourhood plans that have a solid foundation of support.

  12. SNP motion falls

    Universal credit and Jobcentre closures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP motion is defeated by 276 votes to 172.

    The House divides again on the government's proposed amendment, which says MPs should welcome:

    Quote Message: ...last week’s official statistics showing that the poorest households saw the biggest income growth of £700 in the last year; further welcomes the impact of this government’s welfare reforms in supporting low-income households to find work, with over 2.7m more people in work and 865,000 fewer workless households than in 2010; recognises the role of Universal Credit in supporting people into work and increasing their earnings in work by ensuring it always pays to work; welcomes the recent announcement of a reduction in the taper rate to 63%; believes that the government’s reforms have given taxpayers confidence in an affordable and sustainable welfare system that ensures value for money and responds to the needs of claimants, with 86.6% of Universal Credit claims currently being made online; and notes that the Scottish government has asked for an extended timetable for the full transfer of the extensive welfare powers devolved under the Scotland Act 2016."
  13. Minister: 'Work is best route out of poverty'

    Universal credit and Jobcentre closures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Caroline Nokes

    "Work is best route out of poverty," says Work and Pensions Minister Caroline Nokes, closing the debate.

    She says the government policies are "making work pay and supporting people into work while protecting the most vulnerable in society".

    She adds that Universal Credit is "a large and complex programme, which is why we rolled it out slowly" and DWP staff are central to this process.

  14. Vote on SNP motion on Universal Credit

    Universal credit and Jobcentre closures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The minister is interrupted in full flow as it is time to put the SNP's motion to a vote, and the House duly divides.

    The SNP's motion says:

    Quote Message: That this House is concerned at the impact of policies pursued by the Department for Work and Pensions upon low-income households; notes the negative impact on those with low-incomes disclosed in the roll-out of Universal Credit; expresses concerns about cuts to Work Allowances under Universal Credit; believes that the closure of Jobcentre offices in Glasgow and other areas will create difficulties for many people in accessing services; and calls on that department to suspend the roll-out of Universal Credit and the Jobcentre closure programme."
  15. 'Austerity is a choice' says SNP spokesman

    Universal credit and Jobcentre closures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Neil Gray

    SNP employment spokesman Neil Gray says benefit cuts are one of the "main reasons for the rise in child poverty".

    He tells MPs: "Austerity is a choice. Spending at least £4bn renovating this palace is a choice. Spending hundreds of billions of pounds on nuclear weapons is a choice. Cutting tax for the highest earners and biggest businesses is a choice. And cutting £12bn from the Department for Work and Pensions is a choice."

  16. Peer fears for bats, newts and toads

    Neighbourhood Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A toad

    Conservative Lord Renfrew of Kaimsthorn describes the bill as "an important and necessary" one.

    He says that measures to free up more land and trying to reduce the time taken to get planning permission are "desirable" aims.

    However he worries that "our natural resources" such as "bats, newts and toads" will be threatened by measures in this bill.

    Some wildlife campaign groups have raised concern that without sufficient funding, local authorities will not be able to get the right ecological advice when making decisions on planning. 

  17. First use of new Scots welfare powers over Universal Credit

    13 January 2017

    Universal Credit sign

    The Scottish government plans to use its new social security powers for the first time to increase the frequency of Universal Credit payments.

    Universal Credit itself remains reserved, but ministers will use new powers to give claimants the option to be paid fortnightly instead of monthly.

    The government also plans to offer to pay housing benefits direct to landlords rather than via claimants.

    Opposition MSPs welcomed the move, but said the government should do more.

    Read more.

  18. 'This is not a government that works for everybody' - SNP MP

    Universal credit and Jobcentre closures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Alison Thewliss

    "I feel as though we're going round in circles here," says Alison Thewliss, the SNP MP for Glasgow Central, accusing ministers of not providing data about Jobcentre closures in the city.

    She says that "lots of people will find it incredibly difficult" to get to an alternative Jobcentre.

    "Delays in benefits are causing people to go hungry," she also says.

    "People don't have fuel. They don't have electricity in their house because they have no money, because of benefit delays."

    She adds: "This is not a government that works for everybody and they should listen to the people that are actually affected."

  19. 'Too much clinging on to bricks and mortar' - Tory MP

    Universal credit and Jobcentre closures

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Seema Kennedy

    Conservative MP Seema Kennedy says government welfare changes are intended to ensure people do not find themselves in a situation where they are better off on benefits than working.

    This situation was "perverse" as well as unfair, she argues.

    She defends Jobcentre closures, claiming that "only 25% of the floor space [was] actually being used" in some Jobcentres.

    "There's too much clinging on to bricks and mortar when the real question is: what works?", she adds.