Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Live Reporting

Georgina Pattinson

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. Back next week...

    The House of Commons adjourns for the week and will return on Monday at 2.30pm for the last few days of Parliamentary proceedings in 2016.

    Have a good weekend - see you then.

  2. What happened to Peter Bone's Article 50 bill?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A private member's bill that would require the government to trigger Article 50 by the end of March has failed to get a second reading after an objection from a Labour MP.

    Conservative MP Peter Bone’s Withdrawal from the European Union (Article 50) Bill did not get a second reading debate today.

    When Mr Bone moved the bill, an objection was taken from Alan Campbell, the deputy chief whip of the Labour Party.

    In a point of order, Mr Bone said he found it “extraordinary” that Mr Campbell had objected to the bill, when earlier this month his party had supported an identical motion.

    Earlier in the Commons, Mr Bone asked Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing if his bill could be passed unopposed because the house had already “spent seven hours debating it” during an Opposition Day debate earlier this month.

    Mr Bone said it was a “unique procedural point” – and that “the House passed a motion which includes the private member's bill that I am presenting today”.

    The Tory MP was referring to an Opposition Day Debate on 7 December which included an amendment calling on the government to trigger Article 50 by 31st March 2017.

    The deputy speaker said she understood the point, but reminded Mr Bone that “regardless of the length of time a matter has been debated… even if just one person opposes the honourable gentleman’s bill, then I will be obliged to require further consideration of it”.

    Mr Bone’s bill is due to be back on the House of Commons' agenda for a second reading on 13 January 2017.

  3. Minister: decisions must be made for future

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister Nicola Blackwood says all local STPs are published and conversations should be happening with local people.

    She says the plans offer the NHS the chances to think strategically about how to meet rising demands, and says that debate is likely to be vigorous.

    "We all know that the NHS faces difficult choices," she says - and says those choices have been postponed. She says it is not "fair or safe" to keep pushing those decisions off.

  4. MP warns over hospital closures

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    NHS

    Mike Gapes says there is a massive increase in population in north-east London - by 18% in the next 15 years.

    Yet there is no plan to have an additional hospital to cope with that, he says. In fact, he says, the report says that a new hospital is "not practical or realistic". 

    King George Hospital will see a partial closure of the A&E department, leading to a total closure in 2019.

  5. MP introduces adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Now Labour MP Mike Gapes introduces the adjournment debate, which looks at the NHS sustainability and transformation plan for north-east London.

  6. Labour and Tory response to bill

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's John McDonnell speaks to the bill, and says Labour supports its aims.

    Financial Secretary Jane Ellison also responds, saying she shares the aims of the bill, such as tackling poverty in developing countries.

    She says every tax treaty is a recognition of each country as individual entities and they are mutually agreed treaty, so the UK would never try to force a developing country to sign a treaty that goes against its interest.

    She thanks Roger Mullin for bringing forward the bill; but says that while the government supports many of its aims, she says the government will not be supporting the bill.

    Without government support the bill is unlikely to proceed any further.

  7. SNP MP outlines bill

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Roger Mullin is now introducing his Double Taxation Treaties (Developing Countries) Bill.

    It would place a duty on the chancellor to align the outcomes of double taxation treaties with developing countries with the goal of the United Kingdom’s overseas development aid programme for reducing poverty.

  8. Bill passes second reading

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have voted in favour of the Preventing and Combating Violence Against Women and Domestic Violence (Ratification of Convention) Bill by 135 votes to two.

    Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing says how delighted she is to see MPs waving their order paper rather than clapping.

    View more on twitter
  9. Closure motion successful

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The votes are in - and the ayes number 133; the noes - two.

    "The ayes have it, the ayes have it," calls the deputy speaker.

    A closure motion is only successful if at least 100 MPs vote in favour.

    Now the deputy speaker asks that the bill be read a second time - and a second division is called.

  10. Voting begins

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Mike Weir rises to ask that the "question be now put".

    That means that debate on the bill is closed. Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing calls for a division and MPs move towards the lobbies.

  11. Thanks for support

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Michelle Thomson

    Michelle Thomson, the MP who recently spoke about her own rape, speaks to support the bill.

    She says that while warm words were welcome from the minister, "we're looking for hard, specific dates about when something will be done". 

    She says that following her own revelations in the chamber, reading the emails that she was sent was struck by the extent to which "stories go unheard".

    And she thanks everyone who supported her. 

  12. Labour commends government steps but calls for no further delay

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sarah Champion

    Shadow women and equalities minister Sarah Champion speaks about the contributions made by MPs in the chamber during debate on the bill's second reading.

    She mentions the minister's contribution and adds that she is delighted to hear his mentioning the police's work. She says the police have moved forward in their attitude to domestic violence and commends that attitude.

    "We need to acknowledge across the House that this is gendered violence, carried out against women and girls because they are women and girls," she says. If ratified, the convention would mark a step change in the way violence against women and girls is viewed.

    She says the government has made great steps in tackling the issue both domestically and internationally, and it should be commended. But, she says, the convention must be ratified in order to take effect. 

    "The government does appear to be dragging its feet," she says. The Home Office has given the same excuse - on the legislative changes needed, which cut across devolved administrations - for two and a half years, she says. 

    "We need urgent action...and this bill would show the government is committed to that goal," she says.

  13. Minister explains government stance on Istanbul Convention

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Brandon Lewis

    Home Office MInister Brandon Lewis says the government is committed to ratifying the convention.

    He says that some crimes disproportionately affect women and girls; and the government is working to tackle those crimes. In response to an intervention from Philip Davies, who points out that men are the main victims of violent crime, Mr Lewis says domestic violent abuse affects women more.

    He lists government projects and initiatives, which tackle issues such as domestic abuse and FGM, including projects which help men who are victims of domestic violence.

    The government's efforts since 2012 often go further than the convention stipulates, he says, and its overseas efforts work to improve the status and safety of women and girls.

    There does need to be changes to domestic law to comply with the convention, he tells MPs. He says the government welcomes the bill in principle, but there are issues that need to be considered.

    He says devolved administrations need to be consulted, about adding extra-territorial jurisdictions to the bill, and also because there is a four-week timetable built into the bill.

    That will have to be reconsidered at committee stage, and with that he says the government supports the bill.

  14. Overwhelming majority of victims are female - Labour MP

    Private member's bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Thangam Debonnaire

    Philip Davies' speech draws to a close.

    Labour MP Thangam Debonnaire follows him, saying: "That is 78 minutes that I believe I am never going to get back."

    She says she has worked with victims of domestic violence, including male victims.

    However, she adds, "the overwhelming majority" of victims of rape, sexual assault and domestic abuse are female "and this is specifically connected both to their gender and to gender inequality".

  15. Davies: Bill 'introduces unnecessary meddling'

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Philip Davies says the bill "introduces unnecessary meddling from supranational bodies that we can quite do without".

    He urges politicians to have "the guts and the willpower" to send the perpetrators of violence to prison and keep them there.

    "Of course... we oppose violence against women but I, for one, equally oppose violence against men and boys," he continues.

    "I cannot understand for the life of me how political correctness has become so entrenched in this country."

    Men are more likely to be victims of violent crime and are also victims of domestic violence, he argues.

    Quote Message: You couldn't make it up."
  16. Watch again: Labour MP describes domestic violence at Christmas

    Video content

    Video caption: Labour MP Jess Phillips describes how domestic violence affects women at Christmas.