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Summary

  1. Defence questions begin day
  2. Three urgent questions - the first on the crisis in funding social care
  3. The second is on 20th Century Fox’s bid to takeover the remaining 61% of Sky while the third is on conflict in Yemen
  4. Main business is Savings (Government Contributions) Bill
  5. MPs debate welfare cap
  6. Peers looking at Policing and Crime Bill
  7. Private notice question on Southern Rail
  8. Debate on e-petition on whether shops should open on Boxing Day
  9. Chancellor Philip Hammond to be questioned about Autumn Statement

Live Reporting

By Patrick Cowling and Kate Whannel

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Minister Lord Young of Cookham sums up the debate for the government and the bill passes unopposed through all its remaining legislative stages in the House of Lords.

    The end of the debate brings to an end the day's business and peers adjourn for the evening.

    They will return to tomorrow afternoon for oral questions. Until then, good night.

  2. Labour peers 'broadly support' bill

    Small Charitable Donations and Childcare Payments Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour shadow minister Lord Stevenson of Balmacara says the Opposition "broadly supports" the bill, but warns that the legislation does not achieve its objective of simplifying and increasing access to the gift aid scheme for smaller charities.

    He says that he hopes the minister takes careful note of the points raised by peers in this debate, but notes that the bill is a money bill and there are subsequently only limited changes that peers can make to it.

    As the House of Lords is unelected, parliamentary convention means that legislation relating to raising and spending public money is the domain of MPs rather than of peers. 

  3. HMRC needs to work better with charities - Lid Dem peer

    Small Charitable Donations and Childcare Payments Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Barker

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Barker says that whenever HMRC (Her Majesty's Revenue and Customs) comes into contact with the charitable sector "things seem to go horribly wrong". 

    She says that she does not get the impression that people in HMRC understand how difficult small charities find it to deal with the bureaucracy caused by charity regulations. 

    Despite this, Baroness Barker says there is much to be welcomed in the bill, such as extending the upper limit of gift aid donations to £8,000. 

  4. Gift aid yet to fulfill its potential

    Small Charitable Donations and Childcare Payments Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Shinkwin

    Conservative Lord Shinkwin says that although donations to charities remain high in the UK, this hides a "worrying trend" that smaller charities are receiving a lower proportion of donations than they did "only six years ago".  

    He says that donations to smaller charities has fallen across the board by 10% recently. 

    Speaking about the gift aid small donation scheme, he calls it "very welcome and very well intended", saying it is the sort of scheme that should bring significant benefit to smaller charities. 

    Lord Shinkwin warns that the scheme is yet to fulfill its potential and is not working as well as it should because smaller charities are struggling to access it.  

  5. MPs adjourn

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate concludes, as does the day in the House of Commons.

    MPs return tomorrow at 11:30am for questions to the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Secretary. 

  6. Bill is short and technical but not unimportant - Minister

    Small Charitable Donations and Childcare Payments Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Charities
    Image caption: Santa dash, Glasgow 2016.

    Debate now moves on to the Small Charitable Donations and Childcare Payments Bill which is due to receive its second reading, committee stage, report stage and third reading this evening.

    Treasury minister Lord Young of Cookham is leading the debate on the bill, which he describes as short and technical - "but not unimportant". 

    Lord Young calls the charity sector "one of this nation's greatest assets".

    He says the legislation aims to bring in "positive and pragmatic" changes intended to simplify and improve the running of charities, and "make life easier" for them. 

    The bill will make the gift aid process simpler and more flexible so it can benefit a greater number of charities and donations, he says. 

  7. Government will ensure data protection of 'the highest quality'

    Data protection debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Matt Hancock

    Culture Minister Matt Hancock seeks to give assurances to the MP and the tech industry that the government will seek to ensure that the UK's data protection standards are "of the highest quality".

    He tells the House that the General Data Protection Regulations agreed by the EU will come into force in the UK in May 2018 - a date when the government expects the UK to still be in the EU.

  8. Labour peer: Are the Murdochs 'fit and proper' to run Sky?

    Sky takeover statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour shadow minister Lord Stevenson of Balmacara says that there are concerns over the concentration of media power "in fewer and fewer hands". 

    He says that it is "highly unlikely" that James and Rupert Murdoch can be regarded as "fit and proper" persons to lead a broadcasting organisation. 

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Foster of Bath says that he does not want to see an "American-style Fox News" in the UK and asks what the government is doing to ensure that the process of selling Sky shares is "scrupulously fair".

    Lord Keen responds that the issue of whether someone is "fit and proper" to run a media organisation is "entirely a matter for Ofcom". 

  9. Labour MP calls for consistent data protection laws

    Data protection debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Daniel Zeichner

    Daniel Zeichner argues that international consistency for data protection laws is crucial to business, consumers and citizens.

    He says that if the UK is to "remain at the forefront of the digital revolution", data protection legislation must remain equivalent to EU rules. 

  10. BreakingSecond government defeat of the evening

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Division result

    The government is defeated for the second time this evening as peers vote to accept amendment 188 by 136 votes to 130, a majority of 6 votes.

    After this second government defeat of the evening Baroness Brinton's remaining amendments in this group are passed unopposed by the government. 

    That brings to an end today's consideration of the Policing and Crime Bill - Lord Keen of Elie is now repeating the answer given earlier in the Commons to an urgent questions about 21st Century Fox's bid to take over Sky.

  11. Data protection debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A computer screen

    We now come to the final item of business for the day - an adjournment debate on EU data protection rules tabled by the Labour MP for Cambridge Daniel Zeichner. 

    The UK's new information commissioner has called for the adoption of forthcoming EU data protection laws.

    The new EU rules are intended to strengthen the rights individuals have over their data by making it mandatory for large companies to employ a data protection officer and report breaches within 72 hours.

    The UK Information Commissioner Elizabeth Denham told the BBC: "I don't think Brexit should mean Brexit when it comes to standards of data protection".  

  12. Peers vote on victims' support

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Minister Baroness Chisholm of Owlpen says that the code of practice for victims of crime is already a statutory code and therefore all criminal justice agencies are required to provide the services victims are entitled to under it. 

    She points to new training packages at the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) and new guidance from the College of Policing as having improved the way that victims are treated. 

    Baroness Briton says that her main concerns were not addressed and that victims' support services remain "woefully inadequate" in some parts of the country. 

    She says she wants to test the opinion of the House and so peers divide to vote on her amendment 188. 

  13. MPs accept 'coasting schools' definition

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have voted to accept the Coasting Schools Regulations 252 votes to 103.

    Of MPs representing English constituencies the vote was 239 votes to 86.

  14. Victims' support 'just not acceptable'

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Brinton

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Brinton is now moving an amendment that seeks to enforce police observance of the victims’ code. She says that currently the system is not good enough on supporting victims and witnesses.

    Baroness Brinton says that the government had promised a review on this issue "in due course" but she argues that this "is not good enough" - saying that nobody is taking hold of the evidence that we have on what is and isn't working in this area.

    She says that victims currently face a postcode lottery and many receive treatment that is "just not acceptable".

    "We need to move forward and we need to do so quickly" she says. 

  15. MPs vote on 'coasting schools' definition

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate on the welfare cap is concluded and the Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing goes through the remaining orders of the day.

    On motion seven MPs call for a vote. This motion defines the concept of a 'coasting school'.

    Last year the government proposed legislation making it easier to turn 'coasting schools' or schools that had shown a "prolonged period of mediocre performance" into academies.

  16. Background information to the Bill

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The House of Lords Library have put together a briefing document on the bill with background information, accompanying statistics, and summaries of relevant legislation.

    The full briefing can be found here.

  17. Welfare cap is 'unworkable and meaningless'

    Welfare cap debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Ian Blackford

    SNP MP Ian Blackford asks what the point of a welfare cap is if it is going to be breached "time and time again".

    He describes the cap as "unworkable and meaningless". He accuses the government of "talking tough" but failing to change the circumstances of low income households. 

  18. BreakingGovernment defeat on stalking sentences

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have accepted amendment 187A by 160 votes to 149, a majority of 11.

  19. Vote on amendment to increase sentences for stalking

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have divided to vote on Baroness Royall of Blaisdon's amendment 187A which seeks to increase the sentences for stalking offences.

    The result of the division is expected at 7.55pm.

  20. Abrahams: Government 'has starved the economy'

    Welfare cap debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Debbie Abrahams

    Shadow work and pensions secretary Debbie Abrahams disagrees with the minister's reasons as to why the government will breach the welfare cap.

    She argues that it is because the government has failed to create "a strong economy with high wages".

    Instead the government has, she argues, "starved the economy of much needed investment" and failed to ensure that real wages keep up with the cost of living.