Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. Questions to the Attorney General and women and equalities minister
  2. Business Statement lays out week's agenda
  3. Backbench debates on UN International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women; and cancer strategy one year on
  4. Peers are holding debates - the first on Brexit and the armed forces

Live Reporting

By Patrick Cowling, Kate Whannel and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords clock

    The debate concludes as does the day in the House of Lords.

    Peers will return tomorrow at 10am for a debate on Lord Grocott's House of Lords Act 1999 Bill.

    The bill, which would abolish by-elections for hereditary peers, has been fiercely opposed by some peers so a lively debate is expected.

  2. Government 'stand ready to help' Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe

    Iranian human rights debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Goldie

    Baroness Goldie responds for the government and begins by welcoming the deal with Iran as "a major achievement". She adds that the UK does not pursue trade to the exclusion of human rights.

    Not having a crystal ball, she tells peers, she is unable to predict how the Trump presidency will affect the deal.

    On the case of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, she says the government has been working with her family.

    She explains that the families are entitled to decide "how they wish to deal with these situations" and adds "we stand ready to help bring her back should they wish to achieve that end".

  3. Peer attacks 'repressive paranoia' of Iranian regime

    Iranian human rights debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Collins of Highbury

    Labour's Lord Collins of Highbury also asks what steps is the government taking to help bring back Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe back from Iran. 

    We need to hear specific actions, he says.

    On the wider issue of human rights, he accuses the Iranian government of "persistently" harassing lawyers who defend activists.

    He describes the harassment as "one of the most pernicious aspects" of the regime's "repressive paranoia".

  4. House adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The adjournment debate comes to an end, and with it the day in the House of Commons.

    That brings to an end another week in the Commons and MPs will return on Monday at 2.30pm for Defence questions. 

  5. Louis Smith treatment 'unacceptable' - minister

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Culture, Media and Sport Minister Matthew Hancock says that the government's view is that the treatment Louis Smith received was "wholly and deeply unacceptable". 

    He calls it a "historic principle" that people have freedom of expression, but says that this comes with a responsibility of tolerance to others. 

    Speaking about the death threats that Mr Smith received the minister says that freedom to offend is a vital part of the freedom of expression - "but freedom to threaten is not".

  6. Debate on BBC governance begins

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Louis Smith
    Image caption: Louis Smith is a four-time Olympic medallist

    The cancer strategy debate comes to an end and we move on to the day's adjournment debate which is being led by Conservative MP Charles Walker and is on the subject of governance of the BBC.

    Mr Walker raises the issue of gymnast Louis Smith who was given a two-month ban by British Gymnastics for appearing to mock Islam in a video.

    He says that the BBC has a long history of mocking religion, but instead of putting itself between the gymnast and the mob, the corporation put itself "firmly at the head of the mob".

    He criticises a particular Radio 5 Live interview with the gymnast, which he says accused Louis Smith of racism but failed to condemn the multiple death threats Mr Smith received. 

    Mr Walker calls the BBC "wicked and irresponsible" in its actions.

  7. Peer raises the case of Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe

    Iranian human rights debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Afshar

    The debate is opened by Iranian-born Baroness Afshar. She raises the case of the British citizen Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe who has been detained in Iran on secret charges.

    She urges the government to use Iran's desire for a better relationship with the west to secure Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe's release. She notes that the Canadian government has been able to secured the release of one its own citizens jailed under similar circumstances.

    In concluding, she tells peers that she has spent most of her life "speaking truth to power". 

    "I find that in this country I am invited to join your lordships house. In my own birthplace I would be put in prison," she says.

  8. Debates on human rights in Iran begins

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Tehran skyline

    We now come to the last debate of the day which concerns human rights in Iran - particularly in the light of negotiations on lifting sanctions. 

    In 2015, Iran agreed a deal with the US, UK, France, China, Russia and Germany to restrict sensitive nuclear activities in exchange for the lifting of tough economic sanctions.

    Amnesty International has said that the Iranian government curtails freedom of expression, association and assembly. The organisation also accuses Iran of carrying out torture of detainees.

  9. Minister: We need to deliver

    Cancer strategy debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Mowat

    Health Minister David Mowat says that one person is diagnosed with cancer every two minutes in England - telling MPs that since this debate has begun 100 people have received a diagnosis in England.  

    He says that this and other points made in the debate show that the health service is not just about "bricks and mortar" - but is also about things like survival rates. 

    Mr Mowat says that there have been five cancer strategies in last 20 years; which he says shows that it is a cross-party, cross-government subject, but asserts that "what we don't need is another strategy". 

    He says there is not a need for more ideas about what we need to do, but rather a need to deliver "with a great deal of focus" the points in the most recent cancer strategy. 

    "We do need to make that happen." 

  10. Shadow minister welcomes progress

    Cancer strategy debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sharon Hodgson

    Shadow health minister Sharon Hodgson joins other MPs in praising MP John Baron who secured this debate but is absent today due to illness in his family.

    She praised areas where the government has made progress calling it "welcome" and saying she "won't knock" good work in this area. But she does criticise the "false economy" of cutting public health funding with no assessment made of the ramifications it might have.

    Ms Hodgson notes a report that indicates smoking cessation services will reduce by 61% in 2016-17, and weight management services will see a 52% reduction - calling this "damning information". 

  11. Businesses' sense of responsibility 'must be strengthened'

    Corporate Sector debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Henley

    Government spokesperson Lord Henley responds to the debate.

    He tells peers that the government has one "signal overarching belief" - that business' sense of responsibility "must be strengthened".

    He agrees with Lord Taylor's concern over diversity in company boardrooms calling the levels "worryingly low".

    On the topic of workers on company boards, he rejects Lord Stevenson's assertion that the government has abandoned its commitment. 

    He says that the government's green paper does include options to strengthen employee representation.

  12. Strategic allocation of funds needed

    Cancer strategy debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jo Churchill

    Conservative MP Jo Churchill says that she came to the Commons after "a journey with this disease" and says she has been amazed by the MPs who have fought the disease since she was elected in 2015.

    She says that even though there are over 200 types of cancer, debate often becomes channeled down certain themes - such as rare types or prolific types.

    Ms Churchill agrees that as a country we are doing better but says "we could do even better" and asks the minister about plans on how to care for those people who live with the disease - either as a survivor or with palliative care. 

    The MP for Bury St Edmunds says that she welcomes the setting up of cancer alliances - but tells the minister that it must set out how funding will be strategically allocated.

  13. Government green paper 'not a strong one'

    Corporate Sector debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Stevenson says the government's green paper on corporate governance is "not a strong one".

    He notes that none of the proposals would have prevented the "scandals" at BHS and Sports Direct. He also wonders what happened to the promise to put workers on company boards.

    He urges the government to strengthen the corporate governance code, improve the role of trade unions and ban "short term action non pay and rewards".

  14. Call for brain tumour research

    Cancer strategy debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rebecca Harris

    Conservative MP Rebecca Harris is chair of the all-party parliamentary group on brain tumours and starts by congratulating the government on its "focus and direction of travel", but says she is seeking to push it "still further". 

    She says that it is estimated that only 1% of brain tumours are preventable, going on to tell MPs that the only hope for a cure is through research and innovation. 

    While brain tumours represent slightly under 3% of all cancers, Ms Harris says that it is the biggest killer of children and those under the age of 40, of all cancers. 

    Despite this, only 1% of the national cancer spend on research in this area, which she calls an "injustice" for people with brain tumours. 

  15. Diversity in business is falling, warns peer

    Corporate Sector debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Taylor of Warwick

    Lord Taylor of Warwick uses the debate to regret the lack of diversity in the business world.

    He notes that the number of ethnic minority CEOs are falling and that there are only four non-white CEOs in the FTSE 100.

    He says that when addressing business conferences he is, apart from the waiters, often the only non-white face in the room.

    He argues that in the light of Brexit, the UK's diaspora communities needs to be harnessed as the country tries to build trade relationships across the world.

  16. MP calls for more research funding

    Cancer strategy debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim Shannon

    The DUP's Jim Shannon says that the scale of the problem that cancer poses in the UK requires a "coordinated and proactive strategy" to combat it, and says that although he respects the minister - more "can and must be done".

    He says that money must be spent as effectively as possible to give the UK a better chance to achieve world class cancer outcomes.

    The MP for Strangford also tells the chamber that "it is clear" that we need greater funding in research and that there is "most certainly" a government role that can better be fulfilled. 

  17. Peer urges government to help the 'Davids take on the Goliaths'

    Corporate sector debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Couttie

    Baroness Couttie tells peers that for businesses to flourish government should "impose minimum regulation". 

    However she adds that this is only a "credible position" if businesses "play by the rules". 

    Specifically she is concerned that smaller companies can rarely afford the legal fees to challenge bad treatment by "corporate giants". 

    She suggests that the UK should follow France's example where certain disputes can be resolved by a judge in a quicker, cheaper process. 

    We need to "ensure that the Davids can stand up to the Goliaths" she says. 

  18. MP's experience of blood cancer

    Cancer strategy debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Henry Smith

    Conservative MP Henry Smith talks about blood cancers during his speech, saying that many of the 37 different types are not well understood by the general public and says awareness is relatively low. 

    This is despite these cancers being the fifth most common types of cancer that people are diagnosed with in the UK and the third biggest killer. 

    As such, Mr Smith says that blood cancers deserve greater understanding and awareness, and further efforts by the Department of Health and NHS to ensure that patients who are diagnosed and their families are properly supported. 

    He speaks about his own experience with the disease when his mother was diagnosed after only a few weeks of flu-like symptoms with acute myeloid leukemia - and tragically died within 24 hours.