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Summary

  1. Northern Ireland Office questions start Commons day
  2. The Leader of the House is filling in for Theresa May at PMQs
  3. MPs then debate the government's plan for Brexit
  4. Peers debate Policing and Crime Bill

Live Reporting

By Patrick Cowling, Kate Whannel and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

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Lords adjourn

House of Lords

Parliament

Debate on the bill comes to an end and the House of Lords adjourns for the day.

Peers return tomorrow at 11am for oral questions. 

House of Lords clock
BBC

Volunteers on heritage railways

National Citizen Service Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

A steam train leaves Box Tunnel at Box near Bath
PA

The final amendment is moved by Labour's Lord Faulkner of Worcester. His amendment would ensure that nothing in the act would "prevent a young person from working as a volunteer on a heritage railway."

He urges the government to find a solution to "this very significant problem".

Conservative Lord Hodgson of Astley Abbotts supports the amendments. He expresses "astonishment" that a law from 1920s, designed to prevent the exploitation of young people, could stop them from volunteering on industrial heritage projects.

The minister Lord Ashton of Hyde tells peers that he has asked the Office of Rail and Road to look into this issue.

Lord Faulkner hopes the government will amend the 1920 act and withdraws his amendment.

'The dark side' of this bill

National Citizen Service Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Cromwell
BBC

Crossbencher Lord Cromwell says his amendment deals with "the dark side" of this bill. 

He notes that the bill requires NCS schemes to inform the government if it is in financial difficulties. He asks why that is not the case if there have been allegations of child abuse.

Lord Ashton of Hyde replies that if there are such allegations the scheme should contact the police. Informing the Secretary of State is not "an appropriate alternative" he says.

Having received assurances that the government will bring forward an amendment on this issue at a later stage and noting the late hour Lord Cromwell chooses not to push his amendment to a vote.

Peers calls for schemes to be accessible

National Citizen Service Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Royall
BBC

Lib Dem Lord Shipley now speaks to his amendment which states that the NCS trust should have sufficient funds to ensure that young people with disabilities can take part in their programmes.

Labour's Baroness Royall supports the amendment and gives peers an example of a boy being denied access to a NCS scheme because he used a wheelchair.

The minister Lord Ashton of Hyde tells peers that the trust has a duty to make all their schemes accessible.

He adds that the government will bring forward an amendment requiring the trust to specify the number of participants with a disability.

NCS trust should not be 'diverted' from primary task says minister

National Citizen Service Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Ashton of Hyde
BBC

Culture, Media and Sport Minister Lord Ashton of Hyde tells Lord Cormack that he can only offer "a small crumb of comfort, if at all".

He tells peers that the NCS trust is "not resourced" to provide a pilot national citizenship scheme.

He adds that the NCS trust should not be "diverted" from its primary task.

Conservative peer calls for a wider citizenship scheme

National Citizen Service Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Cormack
BBC

Conservative Lord Cormack is speaking to his amendment which seeks to establish a pilot programme for a national citizenship scheme open to 15-18-year olds leading to a graduation ceremony on completion. 

He argues that the scheme could provide "enormous value" and be "administered at little cost".

He tells the government he is looking for "a crumb of comfort" in their response. 

Peers begin debate of the National Citizen Service Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Debate on the Policing and Crime Bill is now adjourned and peers will now consider the National Citizen Service Bill.

The National Citizen Service (NCS) was set up in 2011 under the coalition and is open to 16-17-year olds in England.

NCS consists of courses involving activities, developing life skills, and participating in social action.

The Bill puts NCS on a permanent statutory footing, incorporating the NCS Trust as a Charter body.

 The Bill also imposes a level of government control on the NCS Trust as a publicly funded body. 

'With a heavy heart' peer withdraws his amendment

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Chisholm tries to assure peers that the government is committed to tackling doping.

She says they are currently looking into the evidence to see if further sanctions are needed.

She hopes peers will "bear with us for a little while longer".

"With a heavy heart" Lord Moynihan withdraws his amendment.

Sir Menzies Campbell makes a confession

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Campbell
BBC

Another former Olympian Lord Campbell of Pittenweem makes a confession. 

He tells peer that in his running career he once broke the amateur rules. During a bank holiday meet he was given five pounds more than his legitimate expenses. 

Cries of "shame" come from his fellow peers. 

MPs adjourn

House of Commons

Parliament

A busy day in the House of Commons comes to an end and MPs adjourn for the evening.

They return bright and early at 9.30am tomorrow for questions to the attorney general; women and equalities ministers; and the Leader of the House.

Minister praises 'golden era' of British tennis

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Tracey Crouch
BBC

Culture, Media and Sport Minister Tracey Crouch responds to the debate - saying that it is a pleasure to be able to reflect on success and give credit where it is due. 

She says that she feels "pretty lucky" to be the minister for sport in a "golden era" of such success for these great players. 

Ms Crouch joins other MPs in praising Scottish player Gordon Reid for recently achieving the world number one spot in wheelchair tennis.   

She says that she thought sibling rivalry in her childhood was something but remarks that it must be quite special in the Murray household where one brother holds two Wimbledon titles but the other one got there first.  

"Given that my sister is not in a position to answer back I think it is only fair that the record shows that I always won" she says, laughing. 

'An enchilada of performance-enhancing drugs'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Moynihan
BBC

Conservative peer and former Coxswain Lord Moynihan now speaks to his amendment on national anti-doping provisions. 

His amendment would criminalise doping, making it illegal for an athlete to take a banned substance with the intention of enhancing his performance.  

He tells peers that cheats who take an "enchilada of performance-enhancing drugs knowingly shred the dreams of clean athletes with every needle they inject."

The sporting legacy of the Murray brothers

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jamie and Andy Murray
AP
Andy and Jamie Murray at the Davis Cup tennis tournament semi-final between Great Britain and Argentina in 2016.

The SNP's Steven Paterson is now leading the adjournment debate on the sporting legacy of Andy and Jamie Murray.

Andy and Jamie Murray are sibling tennis players who won in both the singles and doubles ATP World Tour Finals this year.

Both brothers finish the year as the number one ranked tennis players in their respective categories in the world. 

Judy Murray, Andy and Jamie Murray's mother, has said she wants to secure a national legacy for their success

Ms Murray would like to establish a world-class coaching facility near Dunblane at the Park of Keir, but the proposed development was turned down by Stirling council after objections from protesters.

The future of the project now rests on the result of a public inquiry, held in September, which has yet to report.

Lowering limit would be 'counter-productive'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Wiliams of Trafford says the government will be interested in any research coming out of Scotland.

However, she currently believes that a lower limit would be "counter-productive", arguing that it would stretch enforcement resources and prevent police from catching "the most dangerous" drivers.

The amendment is withdrawn.

Ken Clarke votes against government

Parliamentary reporter tweets

Conservative peer calls for a reduction in drink-drive limit

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Berridge
BBC

Conservative Baroness Berridge now speaks to an amendment which seeks to reduce the legal limit of alcohol in the blood for drivers.

Green Party peer Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb says that the lowering limit is "the biggest incentive" to reduce drink driving. 

Conservative Earl Attlee opposes the amendment. He says everyone agrees that alcohol in the blood adversely affects people's driving. 

However he wants the government to wait until the results of an experiment on lowering the limit in Scotland are known. 

BreakingMPs vote for government to publish Brexit plans

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have approved the amended Labour motion, which calls on the government to publish its plan for leaving the EU before Article 50 is invoked on 31 March 2017, by 448 votes to 75, a majority of 373. 

That brings to an end the debate. 

BreakingMPs approve amendment to trigger Article 50 by 31 March 2017

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Division result
BBC

MPs have voted emphatically in favour of the government amendment to invoke Article 50 by the end of March 2017 by 461 votes to 89, a majority of 372.

The motion as amended is now put to MPs and another division is called by the Speaker.

The result of this vote is expected at 7.30pm. 

Government warns against 'piecemeal reform'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Fixed odds betting terminals
PA

Baroness Chisholm seeks to assure peers that the government is "alive to the concerns" about gaming machines.

She says that the government is currently holding a review into such machines and suggests it would be best to wait for the review to conclude before creating new regulations. 

She also warns against introducing "piecemeal reform" which she fears could lead to "unintended consequences".

Lord Beecham withdraws his amendment. 

Division!

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

John Bercow
BBC

The debate has come to an end and MPs divide to vote on the government's amendment to the Labour motion.

The amendment accepts the wording of the Labour motion that calls for the government to publish its plan for leaving the EU before triggering Article 50, but adds at the end that this must be:

consistent with the principles agreed without division by this House on 12 October; recognises that this House should respect the wishes of the United Kingdom as expressed in the referendum on 23 June; and further calls on the Government to invoke Article 50 by 31 March 2017"

Minister: Government is getting the job done

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Robin Walker
BBC

Robin Walker, Minister for Exiting the European Union, winds up the debate for the government. He says the government is "getting on with the job" of delivering the mandate of the British people.

The minister warns that the government is taking its time to get the detail right because "getting our approach right the first time" is in the long term national interest.  

He warns against rushing such a "complex challenge with a wide range of potential outcomes". 

Mr Walker says parliamentary scrutiny "is invaluable", but says that cannot be at the expense of binding the government's hands in negotiations.

Shadow minister - 'This is what taking back control means'

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jenny Chapman
BBC

Labour's shadow Brexit minister Jenny Chapman is now responding to the debate for the Opposition.

She says that David Davis' comments at the start of the debate was "not sufficient" - asserting that Parliament "must see the plans" in a way that means they can be "tested, debated and if necessary amended".  

"This is what taking back control means" she says - telling the government that with control comes accountability. 

"The future of the UK is in the balance" she says; calling this issue the greatest challenge for politicians in our generation. 

The government should not therefore be surprised, she says, when MPs show an intense interest and concern in how Brexit proceeds.

Labour peer argues for restrictions in gambling sector

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Beecham
BBC

Labour peer Lord Beecham speaks to his amendments, which place additional conditions on the use of gaming machines and would require premises where gambling machines are used to have at least two members of staff present.  

"Assaults on staff are increasing" and the gambling industry has "blighted" many of the UK's high streets, he says. 

Lord Beecham hopes the government will not be swayed by the "self-interested testimony" of the industry. 

Labour MP: Put EU nationals' uncertainties to rest

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Tulip Siddiq
BBC

Labour's Tulip Siddiq asks about the concerns of EU nationals who live in her constituency and have contacted her about their future in the country.  

She says that she "can't give them those answers" because the government's plan has been "shrouded in mystery from the start", and although she welcomes ministers accepting Labour's motion she says it is "far too little far too late". 

Ms Siddiq says that the issue of EU nationals is "not just a moral issue" and says the benefits to the economy of such people must be acknowledged.  

She says many of these EU nationals are "significantly younger" than the national average and are more likely to be in work. 

Ms Siddiq calls on the government to secure the future of EU nationals and put their uncertainties to rest. 

The results are in

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted against Baroness Deech's amendment calling for duties to be placed on pubs and restaurants to secure access for disabled people.

177 peers voted against the amendment, while 135 voted in favour of it. 

UUP MP - 'A phenomenally complicated step forward'

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

UUP MP Danny Kinahan says MPs must listen to the people and do what they have said by triggering Article 50 - despite the fact that he voted to Remain.

He says that although he initially thought a "red, white and blue Brexit" was "lovely", he wants to see "a bit of green and orange in there too".

"We trade with Ireland, Ireland are our neighbours" he says and asks for careful consideration as this is a "phenomenally complicated step forward with so much at stake".

Brexit - 'no ifs no buts'

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Richard Drax
BBC

Conservative Richard Drax says that the vote to Leave came with "no ifs, buts, conditions - nothing". He goes on to say that former Prime Minister David Cameron spent £9 million of taxpayers money on literature "telling us all that".  

"It really could not have been simpler" he says. 

Mr Drax says that Article 50 merely starts the two year period within which negotiations can begin. "The British people voted to leave the EU; the only way to do this is to trigger article 50 - it's as simple as that" he says. 

Talking about the concerns about uncertainty, he blames this on people "prevaricating against the will of the British people". 

Voting time

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Deech decides to push her amendment to a vote, saying access for disabled people "should be mainstream". 

Peers file out of the Chamber in order to cast their votes.

The result is expected at 6.40pm.

Minister: Amendment might be 'special case'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Williams
BBC

Baroness Williams of Trafford commends the persistence of peers in seeking "to secure equal rights" for disabled people.

She says the amendment might be a "special case" but argues that "we can't downplay" the fact that it will have a cost to business in discharging this new function. 

"I cannot ignore the strength of feeling" within the House, she says - and tells Baroness Deech there may be "further compromise to come" at a later stage of the bill.

Green MP: Government amendment 'a Tory trap'

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Caroline Lucas
BBC

Green MP Caroline Lucas says that she will not be able to support the Labour motion if the Opposition frontbench insists on adopting the government amendment; calling it a "Tory trap" of insisting that Labour vote to invoke Article 50 by March.   

"Introducing a tight timetable based on an arbitrary deadline", she says, undermines the principle that this is about getting the best deal possible for Britain.  

Ms Lucas also notes that negotiations will not really get under way until the autumn of 2017 after the French and German elections.  

The MP for Brighton Pavilion says that the government's plan needs to be more than "a sum of the banalities" that have been given until now - and calls for a white paper to be published. 

She says that to vote to leave the EU without knowing what the final agreement will contain is "irresponsible" and "reckless". 

Lib Dem: Need to change attitudes

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Hamwee
BBC

Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Hamwee supports the amendment - saying that there is a need to introduce legislation in order to "change attitudes".

The amendment will "concentrate minds" within the restaurant industry as good practice is "not always observed" she says.

End 'humiliation' for disabled people

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Deech
BBC

Crossbench peer Baroness Deech moves her amendment which places duties on licensing pubs and restaurants to secure access for disabled people. 

Baroness Deech says the right of disabled people to participate in everyday life can depend on the "ability to access" public buildings.

The scenario where disabled people facing the "humiliation" of finding a restaurant inaccessible must be "brought to an end", she urges. 

Where is the consent for NI, asks SDLP MP

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Mark Durkan
BBC

Mark Durkan, the SDLP MP for Foyle, says that consensus can sometimes be a great and powerful thing; but warns that the consensus today is "entirely artificial" and "made up from a purely ephemeral coincidence of tactics without any substantive or strategic worth". 

Therefore, he says "we shouldn't fall for it".

Mr Durkan talks about the Good Friday Agreement and the effect on it by the vote to leave the EU; saying that the agreement was the high water mark of Irish constitutional democracy.

He says that the former Northern Ireland Secretary Theresa Villiers had tabled a statement referencing Republican dissidents soon after the EU referendum, which said "Northern Ireland's future will only be determined by democracy and consent".

"Where is the democracy and consent for the people of Northern Ireland when it comes to Brexit?" he asks - a reference to the 55.8% Remain vote in Northern Ireland.

Saving live music venues

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Music concert
Getty Images

Lib Dem Lord Clement Jones and the Earl of Clancarty now speak to their amendment which would require local authorities to consider the "cultural benefits to the community" when deciding to grant a live music license.

Crossbench peer Earl of Clancarty tells peers that over the last decade London has lost 40% of its live music venues. 

Baroness Chisholm says the current licensing regime is aimed at "harm reduction". She tells peers that this is bill is not the appropriate place to pursue the goal of helping live music.

Lord Clement-Jones does not push the amendment but believes the campaign to save live music is growing. 

SNP: Involve Scottish Parliament in negotiations

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Joanna Cherry
BBC

SNP MP Joanna Cherry says that triggering Article 50 will lead to the legislative competences of Scottish Parliament being curtailed and the rights of individuals and businesses being affected. 

She speaks about the political implications of the government's line in the Supreme Court as regards the involvement of the Scottish Parliament and government in the process of triggering Article 50.  

Ms Cherry talks about a potential constitutional crisis if the Scottish government and Parliament are not officially included in the process.

Opposition's stance is backing government policy - Rees-Mogg

Brexit debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jacob Rees-Mogg
BBC

Conservative Eurosceptic Jacob Rees-Mogg says "Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition has reached a point of such loyalty that it is having a day's debate to back Her Majesty's government's policy". 

"This is a very interesting way of passing our time and it should form a new means of having a consensus across Parliament," he says. 

But he goes on to say that a desire to reject the decision of the referendum "underlines" every part of the debate.

Labour peer calls for restrictions on 'vaping alcohol'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

A bottle of beer
BBC

Labour's Lord Brooke of Alverthorpe now speaks to an amendment which would make powdered or vaping alcohol a class C drug.

Crossbench Baroness Finlay of Llandaff explains that, unlike liquid alcohol, the powdered drug goes straight to the blood producing a far more rapid high.

Labour's Lord Kennedy admits that he had, until recently, never heard of powdered alcohol and calls for the substance to be properly regulated.

Baroness Chisholm argues that the current regulations are sufficient. 

Lib Dem asks for guarantee on 'destination as well as departure'

Brexit Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Liberal Democrat MP Tom Brake thanks Labour for securing the debate, and says the government cannot share the credit for this debate and that they should have initiated it in their own time.  

His praise for Labour ends here - and he calls the government pledge to publish Brexit plans "thin gruel"; warning that it may well contain no detail and just "meaningless phrases and Brexit platitudes that masquerade as policy".   

Mr Brake asks where the guarantee is that people will be able to vote on the "destination as well as the departure" on the government's deal with the EU after triggering Article 50.   

The Lib Dem says that whatever the outcome of the negotiations in two years time, "we can be certain that a majority won't be happy".    

He says his party will oppose the government amendment as a "Parliamentary stitch-up that will straitjacket MPs" and tells Labour MPs that they are the official opposition and should not cave in to the government. 

The former Coalition minister says that the Liberal Democrats are now the "real opposition" to the Conservative Brexit government.  

Peers debate firearms usage

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Viscount Hailsham
BBC

Lords have now moved on to a number of amendments that deal with the licensing of firearms.

The government has tabled an amendment allowing 17-year-olds to borrow a rifle or shotgun provided they are supervised by the official "lender" of the gun. 

Conservative Viscount Hailsham recalls using a .22 carbine rifle "in his youth" under the "strict supervision of his father". We felt nothing improper in that, he says.

He believes that the threshold of 17 is too high and suggests the age should be reduced to 14.