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Summary

  1. Brexit questions start Commons day
  2. Business statement lays out agenda for week ahead
  3. Backbench business debates for rest of day
  4. Topics include transgender equality and UK fishing industry
  5. Peers start at 11am with questions
  6. Afternoon's debates include Brexit and social care

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Claire Gould

All times stated are UK

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Peers adjourn

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords clock
BBC

The debate finishes and peers adjourn for the day.

The House of Lords returns tomorrow at 10am for a debate led by the Archbishop of Canterbury on the "shared values underpinning our national life". 

Filter regime not in 'jeopardy', says minister

Online safety debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Shields
BBC

Baroness Howe receives plenty of praise from her fellow peers for her persistent work on this issue. 

Labour's Baroness Thornton says that when the history of online child protection is written, there will be a "glorious chapter" devoted to her efforts.

Responding to the debate, Minister for Internet Safety Baroness Shields tells peers that the filter regime is "in no way in jeopardy".

She acknowledges that there has been uncertainty on the matter, but assures members that the government will amend the Digital Economy Bill to allow content filters. 

House adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The adjournment debate comes to an end and with it the day in the House of Commons. 

MPs return tomorrow for consideration of private members' bills from 9.30am.

Minister: Government open to ideas

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Communities and Local Government Minister Marcus Jones says the government is "100% committed" to being open to "innovative bottom-up" proposals that will improve local services, enhance accountability and deliver financial sustainability. 

'The deadline is upon us'

Online safety debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Howe
BBC

Crossbencher Baroness Howe notes that in 2015 the then Prime Minister David Cameron said that online content filters did conflict with EU regulations but that the UK had secured an opt out and that a law would be made allowing ISPs to establish such filters.

She adds that in December 2015 then minister Baroness Shields said the legislation would have to be in place by December 2016.

Baroness Howe informs peers that today is the first day of December 2016 - "the deadline is upon us".

She notes that the government has promised to add an amendment to the Digital Economy Bill allowing for content filters to be used but this means the measure won't become law until March 2017.

Does the date no longer matter, she asks.

Disharmony on the green benches

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Christopher Chope
BBC
Christopher Chope and Simon Hoare spar in the chamber

The adjournment debate gets a bit heated after the Conservative MP for North Dorset Simon Hoare intervenes to oppose Mr Chope's argument. 

When he tries to intervene again, Mr Chope refuses to give way which prompts Mr Hoare to raise a point of order with the deputy Speaker - this procedural device means he can pause the debate to raise a problem with the chair of the debate.  

In his point of order, Simon Hoare asks if it is in order for Mr Chope to refuse to take his intervention when the debate addresses his constituency too. 

The deputy Speaker says that as it is Mr Chope's debate it is up to him. 

Christopher Chope says that the "spurious intervention" by Mr Hoare demonstrates that he is "embarrassed that he is not on top of the facts". 

MP examines Christchurch council proposals

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Christopher Chope
BBC

Conservative MP Christopher Chope is now moving the day's adjournment debate which is on the proposed abolition of Christchurch and East Dorset councils.

The nine councils that cover Dorset have been running a consultation on reducing the number of councils to two.

The proposals involve creating one council for the urban area around Bournemouth and one for the rest of the county.

The Dorset councils believe they can save money and prevent service cuts.

Does today's political drama recall the 1970s?

A light is shone on the role of the government whips in the play This House.
A light is shone on the role of the government whips, those who aim to keep their MPs in order, in a play that has returned to the stage, four years after a sell-out run.

Daily Politics reporter Mark Lobel sees political parallels between the Labour government of the 1970s with the current Conservative administration, with both grappling with European and devolution issues by leaders with slender majorities in the Commons.

Minister: New waters ahead post-Brexit

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

George Eustice
BBC

Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Minister George Eustice responds to the debate and joins others in paying tributes to those who have lost their lives at sea in the industry as well as their friends and families.

Mr Eustice says the government is "committed" to acting on the decision made by the British people in the referendum, and in withdrawing from the Common Fisheries Policy in favour of a "new fisheries regime".

As an independent coastal state, he says, the UK would be fully responsible under international law for waters in our exclusive economic zone and the management of those waters within it - including fisheries.

Peers begin debate on online safety

House of Lords

Parliament

Young girl browsing the internet
BBC

We now come to the final debate of the day - a debate about child safety online and EU regulations.

The EU Connected Continent regulation makes all EU internet traffic abide by net neutrality principles.

The principle of net neutrality is that an ISP (internet service provider) cannot favour certain websites or services over another in speed.

The government intends to introduce internet censorship to protect children from seeing inappropriate content online; however there are concerns that this would conflict with the EU Connected Continents legislation.

Trade outside the EU

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Sue Hayman
BBC

Shadow minister Sue Hayman asks the government what transitional arrangements the government will put in place to see the industry through the UK leaving the EU.

Ms Hayman also says it is important that the government makes headway on the future of our trading relationships, telling MPs that around 80% of the British catch is exported primarily to the EU.

As this is the case, she says that negotiations need to take into account the effect a "less than ideal" trade deal could have on the industry.

I have not given up hope, says minister

Social care debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Prior of Brampton
BBC

Health Minister Lord Prior of Brampton begins by admitting that the debate is "not easy to respond to".

There is no question that adult social care is under "huge pressure" he says, but urges peers not to become depressed.

He argues that one way of easing the pressure is better integration between health and social care. However, he notes many governments have tried to facilitate such integration - not always with success.

It looks bleak, he says, but assures the House that he has not given up hope.

Lord Prior says there is currently a "tough financial background" but disagrees with those who have argued that this will make dealing with social care harder.

He argues that change will only happen if "organisations are forced to change in order to survive". 

'Let our boats go to sea'

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Angus MacNeil
BBC

Angus MacNeil is summing up the debate for the SNP.

Mr MacNeil tells the minister to stop the "overzealous" actions of the border agencies that are working against the economic interests of the west coast of Scotland and Northern Ireland.

"For goodness sake," he says, "let our boats go to sea".   

Best of today

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What is the CFP?

Future of the fishing industry debate

The UK’s fishing industry is regulated at an EU level by the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP) and managed in England by the Marine Management Organisation (MMO), Marine Scotland in Scotland, Natural Resources Wales in Wales and the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development in Northern Ireland.

Under the CFP, every year, the European Commission proposes a Total Allowable Catch (TAC) for each commercial species for each area within the EU 200-mile limit. 

TACs are then shared between EU countries in the form of national quotas. The TACs are agreed by the Council of Ministers at the Agriculture and Fisheries Council – normally with some increases from the original proposals – at the end of the year.

Untangling legal knots

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Kevin Hollinrake muses on the historical net of fishing conventions that predate the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), and gives some context for the agreements and the rights they gave to other European nations. 

He says that the dream of "a brand new clean slate" of domestic fishing policy may be more complicated to achieve than many think. 

Will the CFP revert to the 1964 fishing convention? Will that in turn then revert to the 19th century conventions? 

Mr Hollinrake wishes the minister well in "untangling these legal knots". 

Wheeler: Social care is failing

Social care debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Wheeler
BBC

Labour's Baroness Wheeler responds to the debate.

She quotes a Guardian article that estimate a social care rescue package would cost £1.3bn - "the same amount the Autumn Statement allocated for roads".

Despite the "commitment of providers", she says social care is failing and needs "long term funding".

Brexit 'a huge step forward' for fishing industry

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jim Shannon
BBC

DUP MP Jim Shannon says that a "huge step forward" in addressing the problems faced by the fishing industry was taken on 23 June when the UK voted to leave the EU.

He says that he has "every confidence" that in his local fishing town Portavogie "every man, woman, and unborn child" voted to Leave the European Union.

Mr Shannon warns the minister that the fishing industry will not want the Common Fisheries Policy to be replicated in UK law, as he blames EU red tape on the decline in fishing in his constituency.

Government must 'grasp the nettle'

Social care debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Walmsley
BBC

The Lib Dem spokesperson on health Baroness Walmsley speaks on how the pressures on social care lead to pressures on hospitals.

Delays in discharge, due to a lack of care at home, and the inappropriate use of A&E by vulnerable people who can't get care elsewhere all add to the burden on the NHS, she says.

"Successive governments have failed to grasp the nettle" of properly provisioned social care, says Baroness Walmsley.  

As a gardener who understands that "even nettles have value", she urges the government to grasp the nettle of what needs to be done.

Fishing for a good haul of information?

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

What is the Common Fisheries Policy? What are fishing quotas? Are sea bass stocks declining?

The answers to all of these questions and more can be found in the House of Commons library briefing for this debate.

'Not scaremongering but facts'

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Margaret Ritchie
BBC

The SDLP member for South Down, Margaret Ritchie, speaks about problems faced by the industry in Northern Ireland and Western Scotland.

She asks for a meeting with ministers on the crewing of trawlers in her area. The minister, she says, is aware of the "serious problems" fishing crews have had in recruiting local people to work in the fleet which has resulted in "qualified and experienced" non-EEA crews.

Ms Ritchie says this could "tie up" her local industry.

"That is not scaremongering that is fact," she says.

Financial pressure on private care sector

Social care debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Warner, and Labour peer Viscount Hanworth both point out the precarious financial position of many private care providers.

Viscount Hanworth cites the case of residential care provider Southern Cross, which was forced to sell a number of care homes it managed in 2011.

Lord Warner quotes the Care Quality Commission findings that "for the first time ever, new private providers are not entering the sector".

He recommends the transfer of responsibilities for local social care from the Department for Communities, to the Department of Health to ensure a better co-ordinated approach to care provision.

Fishing for unity

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP for Waveney Peter Aldous calls for unity between those on different sides of the referendum debate.

He urges MPs to "put that battle behind us and grasp the opportunity to breathe life back into this great industry".

Mr Aldous says the government must have the "three Rs" in mind at all times when considering the fishing industry; repatriation, reallocation, and regeneration. 

'Irascible, demanding, difficult' old age

Social care debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Farrington
BBC

Labour peer Baroness Farrington speaks on the pressures faced by family carers, she says it isn't always easy to care for an elderly person, as "some of us, myself included, become irascible, demanding and difficult".

She warns the minister against building up another problem in future, "if we don't look after carers", many of whom are informal, family carers who are "put under intolerable pressure", she says.

Serving the sector: importance of Scottish seafood emphasised

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The SNPs Stephen Gethins admits that even as a European, he realises the Common Fisheries Policy has "ill-served" the fishing industry since its introduction.

That said, he asks MPs to keep in mind the importance of the single market to the Scottish seafood sector, saying that in 2015 Scotland exported £438m of seafood to the EU, and that this is the second largest food and drink export after whiskey.

Mr Gethins also says that the fishing industry has not always been well represented by its member state, the UK.

The SNP member finishes by warning that devolution has changed the context of the way this debate is held in the UK and says Scotland's opinion must be respected.

Exploring new horizons for fisheries management

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The Lib Dem MP for Orkney and Shetland, Alistair Carmichael, says that "taking control back is only part of the answer" and says that of just as much importance is the question of what you do with it.

He says there is now an opportunity to construct our own domestic fisheries management system that puts fishermen, conservationists, and scientists at the heart of fisheries management.

Mr Carmichael says this should allow "proper regional and local management".

Think about old age, warns Baroness Cavendish

Social care debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Cavendish
BBC

Baroness Cavendish rises to make her maiden speech.

Camilla Cavendish is a former journalist and was head of the prime minister's policy unit from May 2015 to July 2016.  

She now sits in the Lords as a Conservative peer.

Baroness Cavendish says too many people are not aware of the kind of care that might be available to them in old age, and how much they may need to be prepared to provide for themselves.

People don't like to think what will happen to them when they get older, she says, and so policy on social care "lags behind" that devoted to the NHS.

She closes saying care services must be properly supported because they will be caring for "our mothers and grandmothers" if not today, then tomorrow.

No place for Common Fisheries Policy

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Owen Paterson
BBC

Former environment, food and rural affairs secretary, Conservative Owen Paterson now speaks in the debate, and unsurprisingly takes a different view of the referendum vote than Labour MPs. 

"Brexit is a most wonderful opportunity for our marine environment and those who work in it," he says. 

The MP for North Shropshire calls the Common Fisheries Policy "a biological, environmental, economic, and social disaster" that is beyond reform. 

He goes on to call the system of quotas and throwing caught fish back into the sea "an act of criminal insanity". 

'Can we get our priorities straight?'

Social care debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Pitkeathley
BBC

Labour's Baroness Pitkeathley opens the debate and notes that peers present are the "usual suspects", "who bang on about this subject whenever we get the opportunity".

Lamenting the fact that last week's Autumn Statement did not mention social care, she says: "I bow to no one in my desire to see better broadband in rural Hertfordshire, but can we get our priorities straight?"

She says politicians have to start being honest with care recipients about what level of care they can expect tor receive. 

Justice department 'determined to succeed'

Prison safety and security

Westminster Hall

Sam Gyimah
BBC

Justice minister Sam Gyimah is now answering the debate on prison safety and security.

He begins by noting the tone of the debate has been "sensible" and that opposition members are right to want to press the government for detail on its proposals.

He goes on to express his support for the work of prison officers, and says the department has come to an agreement with the Prison Officers Association to improve staff pay and pensions. 

Mr Gyimah says the proposals are not simply "long on aspiration" but that the new team in the Justice department are "determined to succeed".

Praise for the RNLI

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Alan Campbell
BBC

The Labour MP for Tynemouth Alan Campbell begins his comments by commemorating those who have died at sea in the industry in the last year, in what, he tells MPs, is still the most dangerous peacetime industry. 

He also thanks the work of those who keep them safe, including the Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) and other organisations and volunteers. 

Mr Campbell taps a similar vein as Sarah Champion in speaking about pledges made during the EU referendum campaign to fishing communities, saying "I voted Remain but if I was a fisherman I would have voted Leave". 

This, he says, is because "they were encouraged to believe" a number of things by Leave campaigners. 

The Labour MP also asks about EU funding for fisheries. "If it's not EU funding then where is it going to come from?" he asks. 

Debate on social care begins

House of Lords

Parliament

Hands of an elderly woman
PA

Peers now move on to a debate on the challenges in the current system of social care and of proposals for reviewing it and for longer-term reform of the system.

Former pensions minister Ros Altman has warned that Britain is "sleepwalking into a social care crisis".

Older people with assets of more than £23,250 have to pay for the full cost of any care they receive.

From April 2020, the government is introducing a cap on care charges at £72,000 from the age of 65 onwards. This change has been delayed from the original 2016 introductory date.

'Worrying' lack of detail in government proposals

Prison safety and security

Westminster Hall

Yasmin Qureshi
BBC

Speaking for the opposition in the prisons debate, shadow justice minister Yasmin Qureshi says the lack of detail in the government's white paper is "worrying", and that the reforms are far from the historic overhaul that has been claimed.

In response to an intervention from the minister, Ms Qureshi denies she is against the white paper but is asking for greater clarity on how the proposals will be carried out in practice.

Ms Qureshi says the levels of violence "have not even stabilised" in prisons while the government considers its response.

She closes by calling on the government to consider re-employing those experienced officers who have already been made redundant, to address the shortage of staff.

We want to win the battle for talent, says minister

Brexit debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Anelay
BBC

Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay of St Johns now replies for the government.

Concerning Brexit negotiations, she says there is a balance that needs to be struck. 

She says the government wants to be open but at the same time "it is rather wise not to reveal your hand to soon".

On immigration, she says the government wants to control immigration whilst welcoming those with the "drive, skills and expertise" to help the UK. 

We need to win the battle for talent, she says.

We're going to need a bigger debate...

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs stand to speak
BBC
MPs rise to indicate their desire to speak in the debate this afternoon.

'Cocktail' of problems facing prisons

Prison safety and security

Westminster Hall

Richard Arkless
BBC

Speaking for the SNP in this prisons debate, Richard Arkless returns to the statistic that 6,000 officers were assaulted last year, or 16 assaults per day.  He says its "no wonder they're feeling demoralised".

Mr Arkless says the resource issue is the most pertinent in the "cocktail" of problems facing prisons.

He says many of the government's proposals, such as increased searches for drugs and more purposeful activity for prisoners, relies on there being enough staff.  

Mr Arkless closes saying he hopes the minister will pay tribute to the work of prison officers.

Committee chair: minister is a catch

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Neil Parish
BBC

The Conservative MP and Chair of the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Committee, Neil Parish, highlights a number of issues faced by the industry.  

First, though, he praises the fisheries minister George Eustice, saying that fishermen across the country "expect a very good deal" from him because he's "such a magnificent minister". 

"We expect him to come back with more fish in his pockets and his suitcase," he says. 

Mr Parish also acknowledges the fact that European workers are very important to the fishing industry, and so says the government need to realise that this labour will also be needed. 

He also speaks about the need to ensure there is good conservation, and says Brexit will allow better reaction to problems of fish stocks.  

The MP for Tiverton and Honiton says there is also a lot more to be done to encourage the British people to eat the many different kinds of fish that are caught in our waters instead of sending them abroad. 

Government prioritising immigration 'over everything else'

Brexit debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Hayter
BBC

Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town responds for Labour.

She accuses the government of prioritising immigration "over everything" else including jobs and prosperity. 

She urges the government to build "a national consensus" for a Brexit plan that "will work across the whole UK".

'Selling a false hope'

Future of the fishing industry debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Ms Onn says that it was "very easy" for Leave campaigners to blame the EU for the decline of the fishing industry, but says their view of history is "partial at best" and says that major declines in the industry happened before the UK joined the Common Market.

She accuses Leave campaigners of "selling a false hope" to her constituents and other fishing communities.

"This just isn't fair," she says.