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Summary

  1. MPs on the Brexit Committee looking at UK's negotiating objectives
  2. Commons day begins with Welsh questions
  3. PMQs at noon
  4. Two SNP led debates: first on Chilcot inquiry and parliamentary accountability
  5. Second debate on WASPI women
  6. Peers gather a 3pm for questions
  7. Will be examining Policing and Crime Bill at report stage

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Claire Gould

All times stated are UK

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House adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

The debate comes to an end and that brings to a close the day's business in the House of Lords.

Peers will return at 11am tomorrow, but until then goodnight! 

Tunisia an 'extraordinary achievement' - Minister

UK and Tunisia debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Goldie
BBC

Foreign Office spokesperson Baroness Goldie responds to the debate for the government.

She joins other peers in saying that of all the countries that experienced popular uprisings in 2011, "only Tunisia has succeeded in making the transition to democracy".   

Baroness Goldie says that this political transformation is "an extraordinary achievement", especially in light of what happened elsewhere in the region - reference to the Syrian civil war, collapse of central government in Libya, and other issues rising from the so-called 'Arab Spring'. 

On the issue of travel to Tunisia, Baroness Goldie says "we will keep that under review" and tells peers that the government works with the Tunisian authorities to support them in improving security.

"We will lift the advice against all but essential travel but only when we judge that it is safe to do so" she says. 

Labour: Economic and political situation 'run in tandem'

UK and Tunisia debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Collins of Highbury
BBC

Labour's Lord Collins of Highbury sums up the debate for the Opposition, saying that Tunisia faces "many challenges", including a growing economic crisis and serious security threats, aggravated by the instability across the border in Libya. 

He speaks of the damage done to UK tourism to Tunisia by the attack on tourists in Sousse in 2015. Lord Collins says UK tourism was at up to 400,000 annual visitors before the attacks.  

The Labour peer warns that a failing economy affects the political situation in the country and urges the government "do not avoid giving support". 

"If we do, we are putting at risk the political situation as well as the economic situation" he says.  

"The two run in tandem and that is why UK support is so vital." 

Tunisia 'deserves our increased attention and support'

UK and Tunisia debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Suttie
BBC

Baroness Suttie talks about how far Tunisia has come since its revolution in 2011.

However she warns about economic problems in the country, saying that "if the political revolution has been thorough... it has not been matched over the same time period by economic growth". 

"For many ordinary Tunisians, political and constitutional reform has not seen a substantial improvement in living conditions or in creating real and sustainable jobs" she says. 

The Lib Dem peer also talks about security issues and tourism, especially in light of current Foreign Office advice to UK nationals against "all but essential travel to Tunisia", and asks the minister to comment on these. 

In concluding, she says Tunisia "deserves our increased attention and support". 

Debate on UK's Tunisia stance begins

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Walmsley withdraws her last amendment of the evening, bringing debate on the Policing and Crime Bill to an end for today. 

Finally tonight, peers are debating current UK political strategy towards and plans to develop economic, security and cultural relations with Tunisia.

The debate is being led by Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Suttie.

Tasers on psychiatric wards

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Walmsley withdraws her amendment 118 but moves her next on the list - amendment 119. 

This amendment would oblige the use of tasers on psychiatric wards to be automatically referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission "as a matter of course", in the same way that a death in custody is reported and investigated.

Baroness Walmsley says that such reporting would find out in considerable detail what led to the use of such a severe intervention. 

"Such information can only be helpful to police and mental health providers", she says. 

Baroness Williams disagrees with the amendment, arguing that it would potentially remove a valuable police tactic when they are facing "very dangerous situations". 

Minister: Need for 'right care at the right time'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Williams of Trafford
BBC

Minister Baroness Willaims of Trafford says she applauds Baroness Walmsley's intention and "shares her desire" to ensure that children and young people receive the support they need in both their physical and mental health. 

However, she says she has a "strong belief" that the overriding determinate for referral to health services must be clinical need.

The important thing, she says, is that all children and young people get the "right care at the right time" for all their needs, rather than based on a non-clinician's view on their potential need based on their experiences.

Referring child sexual exploitation cases

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Walmsley withdraws her amendment 117, but is straight back to her feet with the next amendment tonight - amendment 118.

This amendment would create a provision in the bill meaning that where the police have a reasonable belief that a child under the age of 18 has been a victim of a sexual offence or other form of child abuse, the police must refer the child for a mental health assessment by an appropriately trained professional.

She says that the "appropriately trained professional" mentioned can be defined by regulations and local flexibility.   

Baroness Walmsley says that not all children will require "full blown" mental health support, but goes on to say "we know that most of them will need something". 

She also tells peers that targeting high-risk groups will identify mental health needs early, "in much the same way that cancer screening does for physical health".  

'Potentially dangerous' to ban police cell use - Minister

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Chisholm of Owlpen
BBC

Responding to the debate for the government, Baroness Chisholm of Owlpen says that "we can all agree" that someone experiencing a mental health crisis should be taken to a place of safety that would best meet their particular needs.

She also concurs that this "almost always should not be a police station".

Where the government disagrees with the amendment however, is in what she calls the "very rare cases" where it is the judgement of the police officer on the scene that a police station is the safest place, "at least initially", not just for the patient but for the public or anyone else at risk of extreme behaviour. 

Baroness Chisholm says it is "wrong and potentially dangerous" to ban the use of police stations outright, but seeks to assure peers by saying the government has "no intention" of leaving officers without support in making the judgement that a particular situation is of such severity that this would be the correct response. 

Police cells as places of safety

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Walmsley
BBC

Peers are now debating amendment 117 which seeks to ban the use of police cells as places of safety for people with mental health issues. 

Baroness Walmsley, who is moving the amendment, welcomes the 53% reduction in such use of police cells since 2015 - praising police, mental health services and local authorities for this feat. 

However, she says that this still left 2,100 people taken to police cells, which would have "inevitably led" in many cases to exacerbation of their mental health crisis. 

MPs adjourn for the day

Adjourment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The Scottish Secretary David Mundell sports a paisley patterned tie
BBC
The Scottish Secretary David Mundell sports a paisley patterned tie

Culture Minister Matt Hancock notes that many MPs in the chamber are wearing paisley patterns including the Scottish Secretary sitting next to him.

However, he says the town is about more than just the paisley pattern and praises the "fantastic historic buildings" and the 12th century abbey.

He describes how winning the city of culture title has helped Hull and wishes the bid in Paisley well.

There the debate ends as does the day in the Commons.

MPs return tomorrow at 9:30am for questions to the Secretary for Exiting the European Union.

Bail limit amendment withdrawn

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lid Dem peer Baroness Harris warns ministers that the exercise of the new bail limit will be "far more burdensome than they expect" and says these ideas will come back to haunt them.

But, Baroness Harris says there is "little point" dividing the House, so withdraws her amendment. 

City of London

London may seek its own Brexit deal to allow firms to continue recruiting from the European Union, mayor claims.

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Paisley is 'a special place'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Gavin Newlands
BBC

Gavin Newlands tells MPs that Paisley is a "special place" but that it has its challenges.

He argues that winning the title of City of Culture means more to Paisley than other towns.

He says it will bring more than 1 million visitors to the area in addition to hundreds of jobs and a new confidence.

Government 'firmly of the view' that 28 days is correct bail limit

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford tells peers that the changes in the bill are based on a presumption that a subject who has been arrested will be released without bail. 

She echoes the sympathetic comments of some peers that bail has been overused in the past, and says that in reaching its view the government followed research.

"The 28 day limit was not arrived at by chance" she says.

On the issue of cases that extend longer than 28 days Baroness Williams says that this is why the system allows for extensions - "but only where such an extension can be justified".

The government, she says in conclusion, remains "firmly of the view" that 28 days is the correct amount of time.

Labour: Bail limit must be 'necessary, reasonable, and proportionate'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

A number of peers from across the chamber speak in favour of the amendments to the government's 28 day bail limit and Labour frontbencher Lord Kennedy of Southwark agrees, saying that a limit on pre-charge bail terms needs to be "necessary, reasonable, and proportionate".

Former Met Police chief speaks against 28 day bail limit

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Blair of Boughton
BBC

Former Metropolitan Police Commissioner and now Crossbench peer Lord Blair of Boughton says he supports "all amendments" put forward by Baroness Harris.

Use of police bail, Lord Blair says, has hitherto been "seriously under regulated" and used far too frequently and without the supervision of senior officers .

He says that in a number of cases police bail has been used in a "sloppy, unthinking, and unfortunate way".

But, he says, in serious cases police bail needs to extend for longer than the 28 day limit currently proposed in the bill because of many factors; including the gathering of forensic evidence, examining digital evidence, cooperation with the CPS, and for consideration of witnesses.

Lord Blair says that he hopes the government brings in its own amendment on this issue at third reading, because at the moment this provision amounts to "bad legislation".

Debate on Paisley begins

House of Commons

Parliament

Singer Songwriter Paolo Nutini is backing Paisley's bid to become UK City of Culture in 2021
PA
Singer Songwriter Paolo Nutini is backing Paisley's bid to become UK City of Culture in 2021

SNP MP Gavin Newlands now rises to open his debate on Paisley's cultural contribution.

Paisley is applying to be the UK City of Culture in 2021.

Actors David Tennant and Gerard Butler, musician Paolo Nuntini and playwright John Byrne are all from Paisley.

Paisley hopes taking 2021 City of Culture title will bring £50m into the local economy.

MPs reject SNP motion on pensions

Women's pension debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Lindsay Hoyle
BBC

MPs have voted to reject the motion 293 votes to 234.

Extending bail

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Harris of Richmond
BBC

Peers now move on to another potentially contentious issue in the next group of amendments which would change the maximum pre-charge bail period from 28 days to 56 days.

Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Harris of Richmond tells the chamber that it is the professional opinion of many police organisations, including the Superintendents Association of England and Wales and the College of Policing that these amendments be agreed.

This professional opinion "ought to properly be taken into account" she says.

The proposal is that currently defendants and their legal representatives are "needlessly attending police stations to be re-bailed", she says, adding that the government currently say 29% of bail cases are resolved in 28 days.

"That still leaves 71% of bail cases that will require further re-bailing" she says.

'The luxury of opposition'

Women's pension debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Division
BBC

Work and Pensions Minister Richard Harrington says the debate has had "a lot of platitudes and cliches" about taxing millionaires to fund the WASPI women.

The luxury of opposition is being able to promise money without having to find it he says

Promises are cheap, he argues, but the government has to take "hard decisions". 

The debate comes to an end and MPs divide to vote on the SNP's motion unamended. 

Amendment defeated

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Division result
BBC

Amendment 106 has been defeated by 184 votes to 179, a majority of 5. 

Debate now moves on to amendment 108 which relates to regulations about police ranks, and is being moved by former police officer and Lib Dem peer, Lord Paddick.

'Sick to the back teeth'

Women's pension debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Mhairi Black
BBC

Many MPs have suggested that the Scottish government could help fund the WASPI women.

SNP MP Mhairi Black accuses these MPs of "incredible hypocrisy" and a "lack of knowledge".

Scotland does not have the power over pensions she tells MPs.

She goes on to say that even if Scotland did have the power "we are sick to the back teeth of filling in the holes this government creates".

Proposals are 'unfair' - Labour spokesperson

Women's pension debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow work and pensions minister Alex Cunningham says the proposals are unfair, and will "damage" the most vulnerable.

The government have made it clear that they don't care about these women, he argues.

He proposes an extension of pension credits to help the WASPI women by £156 per week. 

Division!

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have divided to vote on amendment 106 which seeks to delete provisions in the bill that would enable police volunteers to use CS, “PAVA” spray or other specified weapons.

The result of the vote is expected at 6.55pm.

Volunteer officers need weapons for self defence

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Williams answers the debate on amendment 106.

She says it is "a fact of life" that PCSOs and volunteer officers are assaulted while on duty. Police chiefs should therefore be allowed to make operational decisions on whether PCSOs should be authorised to carry certain weapons for their self defence, she says.

SNP should 'put their money where their mouth is'

House of Commons

Parliament

Jo Churchill
BBC

Conservative Jo Churchill acknowledges that with hindsight the previous government should have done more to communicate with the women impacted.

She says she sympathises with the WASPI campaign but argues that this is a complex issue.

She urges the SNP to "put their money where their mouth is" and use their tax raising powers to help the women in Scotland.

Extending the authorisation of weapons

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Kennedy
BBC

Labour frontbencher Lord Kennedy of Southwark speaks in support of amendment 106, which seeks to remove a line in the bill giving powers to a police chief to authorise non-officers working for the police service to carry tasers or CS gas spray.

Lord Kennedy says such weapons have killed people, and volunteer officers and police and community support officers should not be authorised to carry them.

Lord Blair says he is concerned about giving these weapons to volunteers, he thinks this part of the bill needs greater "specificity" as to the government's intention.

He says the different types of offensive and defensive weapons need to be categorised, as do the people authorised to carry them. 

Can the police investigate the police?

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Paddick
BBC

Lord Paddick is now speaking in support of an amendment relating to the membership of the Independent Police Complaints Commission, which is to be reformed as the Office of Police Conduct

The amendment seeks to prevent serving or former police officers from serving in the Office of Police Conduct.

Baroness Williams says former officers will be barred from being appointed Director General of the Office of Police Conduct.  She says it would not be sensible to bar other suitably qualified people from serving in non-executive functions purely because they may have previously worked as a police officer.

She says decisions on appointments should be made by the Director General, who can use their discretion on whether to employ former officers in certain roles.

Lord Paddick acknowledges the government's intentions, but is concerned that the perception will be that there has been a relaxation of the number of former officers barred from working on police complaints.

Despite these complaints he withdraws the amendment.

Leveson amendment: government loses vote

Summary from Simon Jones, Today in Parliament

Today in Parliament

Today in Parliament

The government has been defeated in the House of Lords where peers insisted the go ahead be given to the second stage of the Leveson inquiry into ties between the press and police.

Peers backed an amendment to the Policing and Crime Bill by 50 votes requiring the prime minister to proceed with the inquiry, which was promised by the coalition government.

The Culture Secretary, Karen Bradley, has announced a consultation over whether to continue with the second part of Leveson and whether it would be in the public interest.

But the demand for the inquiry was back by peers from all sides of the House, including the former cabinet minister, John Gummer - now Lord Deben - who warned ministers not to renege on a government promise.

The former chair of the Equalities and Human Rights Commission, the independent peer, Lady O'Neill - who proposed the amendment - described it as a "matter of honour."

The government will now decide whether to overturn that decision when the legislation returns to the Commons.

'Opportunism, pure and simple'

Women's pensions debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Shailesh Vara tells MPs that transitional arrangements have been put in place and that the government is not going to go further.

He accuses opposition MPs of doing a disservice to the women impacted by giving them false hope. 

"It is opportunism, pure and simple."

Peers approve police corruption inquiry

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have voted by a majority of 50 to include a clause establishing an inquiry into allegations of corrupt dealings between the police and press.

The results are: Content: 246  Not content: 196.

Amendment 48: what is it?

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Amendment 48, which Lord Rosser says Labour will support, sets out the terms of an independent inquiry into allegations of corrupt dealings between the police and journalists.

Baroness O'Neill says the inquiry would honour commitments made to victims of press intrusion by the government.  

The government is now seeking to hold a consultation on whether to move ahead with Leveson 2, which had to be delayed until all criminal investigations relating to the first part of the Leveson inquiry had been completed.

Nadine Dorries attacks George Osborne for pension changes

Women's pensions debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Nadine Dorries
BBC

Conservative MP Nadine Dorries is one of the women who has been affected by the changes and is also one of those who was not informed of the changes.

She expresses sympathy for the secretary of state who she believes is picking up "the mess" left by someone else.

She accuses the former chancellor George Osborne of making "crude"  changes in the "wrong" way.

Matter of 'honour' for the government to keep promises

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness O'Neill
BBC

Baroness O'Neill presses amendment 48 to a vote, saying that the government made promises to victims of press intrusion which it must now honour.

On the question of costs for holding further inquiries, she says much evidence has already been uncovered in the Leveson process and the financial implications are not as great as stated by the government.

This is 'politics by spreadsheet'

Women's pension debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Tracy Brabin
BBC

Labour MP Tracy Brabin describes the treatment of the affected women as "politics by excel spreadsheet in its crudest form".

She passes on to the government questions her constituents have asked:

"What can the government offer her and why can't the changes be phased in?"

Former police officers contribute

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Paddick
BBC

Liberal Democrat peer and former senior police officer Lord Paddick speaks in favour of the amendment, saying that he himself was a victim of phone hacking. 

He says the Metropolitan Police knew there was widespread phone hacking and "did nothing" to investigate it or to warn victims that their phones were being hacked.  

This was, he says, even when one of the victims was the deputy prime minister and the other was one of their own senior police officers working in the same building as the detectives investigating the scandal.  

Lord Paddick says there has been "no satisfactory investigation" in to why the police behaved this way and says "we need to know". 

Former Metropolitan Police Commissioner Lord Blair of Boughton also supports the amendment and tells peers that he gave evidence to the Leveson Inquiry. 

Lord Blair says he is unsure how much new information will be uncovered by another inquiry, but still supports it as the behaviour was "wrong, reprehensible, and unprofessional - but largely not criminal".

Lord Blair of Boughton
BBC

Press and police collusion 'has always been the case'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Viscount Hailsham
BBC

Conservative peer Viscount Hailsham says he hopes the government will be "robust in resisting" this amendment.

He says he has participated in many inquiries during his time in Parliament and says he has two questions.

"Is the likely outcome of the inquiry and the chances of its recommendations being implemented sufficient to justify the cost of setting it up and the bureaucracy involved?" he asks.

"I strongly suspect the answer to this is no."

He goes on to says that there has been collusion between police and journalists ever since he entered Parliament nearly 40 years ago.

"It is lamentable but it has been the case."

Work and pensions secretary responds to pensions debate

Women's pension debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Damian Green
BBC

Work and Pensions Secretary Damian Green acknowledges that there was "clearly a problem" for the women affected.

To mitigate these issues, he tells MPs that the government made an extra £1.1bn available for transitional relief.

He adds that no woman will experience an increase in their pension age of more than 18 months and 81% will not experience an increase of longer than 12 months.

'Leveson 2' amendments

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve
BBC

Crossbench Baroness O'Neill of Bengarve is now moving her amendment 48 which would allow for an inquiry into complaints alleging corrupt relationships between police and newspaper organisations. 

This is the same amendment that was brought forward by Labour MP Andy Burnham on behalf of the Hillsborough families. 

Baroness O'Neill says that the implementation of the second part of Leveson Inquiry was promised by the former prime minister and a pledge was made to victims of press intrusion as well as to the families of the victims of the Hillsborough disaster. 

She says that since this pledge, there has "been a shift" and government is no longer as committed to Leveson 2 happening. Baroness O'Neill says it is "business as usual" at some of the larger newspaper corporations. 

The peer finishes saying "this is not a trivial matter" and that the commitment made to Leveson 2 is important - "the victims want it; the public want it; and for democracy to function well we all need it".