Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. MPs debating private members' bills
  2. First is a bill making it illegal for anyone to wear medals they have not earned
  3. Urgent question on HMIC's review into the Met's handling of child sexual abuse cases

Live Reporting

By Aiden James

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. Commons adjourns for the week

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House adjourns, bringing the week in Parliament to an end.

    MPs will be back on Monday from 2.30pm for communities and local government questions.

    They will also deal with the remaining stages of the Digital Economy Bill.

    Over in the Lords, there will be questions to ministers, debate on the Pension Schemes Bill and on parity of esteem between mental and physical health.

  2. Minister's optimistic view of the post-Brexit airline industry

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Paul Maynard

    Transport Minister Paul Maynard says MPs will have the opportunity "to discuss thoroughly how we leave the EU".

    The aviation sector will have an important role in the UK's "aspirations" once it leaves the EU, he adds.

    He claims that, if the UK retains its share of the aviation market, "air traffic growth in Asia alone" will create "25,000 high value jobs". He envisions more tourists coming to the UK and the country being "ready to trade with the rest of the world".

    The world wants to do business with the UK, the minister says, and he does not see that changing after Brexit.

  3. Brexit and UK airlines

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Gavin Shuker

    With no more time left for private members' bills, the short adjournment debate begins.

    Labour MP Gavin Shuker opens a debate on the effect on the aviation sector of the UK leaving the EU.

    He argues that UK-based airlines have benefited from arrangements governing their operation across Europe but the UK faces being "not only out of the EU but out of the EU single aviation market".

    The current framework covers 42 countries, he says, and agreements with nations outside Europe such as the United States are governed by EU arrangements.

  4. Final bill runs out of time almost immediately

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    With an unusual amount of government agreement to private members' bills, three have passed their second readings today.

    The fourth bill, the Protection of Family Homes (Enforcement and Permitted Development) Bill, gets about two minutes before running out of time.

    As minister Marcus Jones makes his speech, the bill's sponsor, Labour MP Stephen McCabe, intervenes.

    He says he used to be a government whip on a Friday so he bears Mr Jones "no ill will" for having the task of talking the bill out, but asks if he will agree to a meeting to look at "remedies" to the problems the bill wishes to address.

    But Mr Jones hardly gets any further before the allotted time runs out.

  5. Bill passes second reading

    Local Audit (Public Access to Documents) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Also making his second desptach box appearance is Local Government Minister Marcus Jones, who reaffirms the government's support for the bill.

    MPs agree to give the bill a second reading, which will have its committee stage at a later date.

  6. Labour backing for the bill

    Local Audit (Public Access to Documents) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim McMahon

    Labour's Jim McMahon is back, replying for the opposition to the second bill on the trot.

    He says it is "not for this place to debate the motives of journalists" and it is right that there is acess to information.

    "Journalism is changing," the shadow local government minister says, and the bill concerns public information.

    He notes the backing of the government and the Local Government Association for what he calls an "important" bill.

  7. Rights of all journalists to look at records

    Local Audit (Public Access to Documents) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "I believe it's a short piece of legislation we should welcome," Wendy Morton says. 

    She goes on to explain that it is designed to amend legislation so that journalists - including citizen journalists - can for one month to inspect the accounting records of the financial year just ended of any relevant authority.

    Fellow Conservative Seema Kennedy asks for protection for local authorities who may be exposed to vexatious requests.

    Ms Morton says the point can be probed further in the bill committee, and says there are charges built into the bill.

    And she refers to her predecessor Sir Richard Shepherd, a "staunch defender of whistleblowers".

    This bill speaks to those who would like to see more transparency, she says.

  8. Moving on

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Parking Places (Variation of Charges) Bill is read a second time - in other words, it is approved for committee consideration, without MPs dividing to vote.

    And so the Commons moves on. It's now time for Conservative MP Wendy Morton's Local Audit (Public Access to Documents) Bill.

    The bill is designed to extend public access to certain local audit documents under section 26 of the Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014.

    It is designed to improve the transparency and accountability of local public bodies, Ms Morton says.

  9. Minister urges people to 'shop in their local town centres'

    Parking Places (Variation of Charges) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Marcus Jones

    Shadow minister Jim McMahon indicates that Labour supports the bill and Communities and Local Government Minister Marcus Jones begins his reply on behalf of the government.

    He says that, with shoppers heading to out-of-town shopping centres or "onto the internet", he would encourage people to "shop in their local town centres".

    Mr Jones says that parking is an important issue and his constituency postbag is full of communications on the matter.

  10. Shadow minister argues that local communities should decide

    Parking Places (Variation of Charges) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jim McMahon

    With no other backbench speakers following David Tredinnick, shadow communities and local government minister Jim McMahon rises to speak for Labour.

    He rejects the suggestion that councils are "in an underhand way, trying to extract as much money as possible" from parking charges.

    "This is not a profit-making service," he tells the House. "If a surplus is made it is re-invested."

    Mr McMahon says councils in his constituency offer free parking at certain times or on certain days, which people support - but they also support proper enforcement, especially around schools.

    "I tend to believe we should allow local communities to do more for themselves," he argues.

  11. A bill backed by Santa Claus?

    Parking Places (Variation of Charges) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Tredinnick

    The bill concerns "the procedure to be followed by local authorities when varying the charges to be paid in connection with the use of certain parking places".

    It applies to England and Wales.

    Opening the debate, David Tredinnick says the bill "not only has the backing of the government but also of Santa Claus".

    He argues it will be "very helpful to local authorities, especially at Christmas time" as it allows local authorities to provide free or discounted parking at short notice.

  12. Bill passes second reading

    Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill gets the backing of MPs without a vote. It will go on to be considered in detail by a committee of MPs.

    Next up is the Parking Places (Variation of Charges) Bill, sponsored by the Conservative MP, David Tredinnick.

  13. 'The government is now happy for offer support to the bill' - minister

    Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Harriett Baldwin

    "The impersonation of our heroes might seem a trifling matter, more worthy of humour rather than concern," says Defence Minister Harriett Baldwin.

    However, she argues it is "not mindless fun" and the consequences can be far more serious than they appear "at first glance".

    She says her Conservative colleague Gareth Johnson's bill addresses "a gap that is not covered by the Fraud Act" and that is why the government supports it.

  14. Who is Walter Mitty?

    Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A number of MPs have spoken during the debate of "Walter Mitty types".

    They were referring to the main character in a short story by James Thurber called The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, about a man who spends his time in a fantasy world of daydreams.

    It first appeared in the New Yorker in 1939.

  15. Shadow minister declares Labour's support for the bill

    Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow defence minister Fabian Hamilton says a person wearing medals to which they are not entitled "causes real offence".

    He indicates that the opposition will support the bill.

  16. 'Ridicule is a good way to deal with these Walter Mitty characters'

    Awards for Valour (Protection) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Bob Stewart

    "It takes some neck to wear medals you've not earned in front of veterans," says Conservative MP Bob Stewart, a former Army officer. "It takes some sort of courage."

    He adds: "It's so easy to out them... It's pretty odd that people think they can get away with it."

    He says that "ridicule by real service veterans is a very good way to deal with these Walter Mitty characters".

    Mr Stewart says he wears fake medals, because the real ones "are in some safe somewhere".

    Therefore, he adds, "if you ever see me poncing around, proud as a peacock, wearing medals, please don't come and denounce me".

    At this point, Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing says Mr Stewart is using "unparliamentary language towards himself".