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Summary

  1. Day begins with questions to Scotland ministers
  2. PMQs at noon
  3. Autumn Statement outlines Chancellor's proposals and forecasts
  4. Debate on EU and transport finishes Commons day
  5. Peers question ministers, then move onto a series of bills
  6. Brexit Committee holds meeting examining UK negotiating stance

Live Reporting

By Patrick Cowling, Kate Whannel and Aiden James

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords clock

    Debate on the bill concludes and the bill will move on to its third reading.

    The House of Lords is now adjourned. Peers will return tomorrow at 11:00am for oral questions.

  2. Peers praise 'a fine minister'

    Intellectual Property Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe

    Business Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe tells peers that the amendments are in response to objections made at committee stage and seek to bring clarity to the bill. 

    Conservative Lord Lucas is pleased with the results and describes Baroness Neville-Rolfe as "a fine minister doing a fine job".

    Opposition spokesperson Lord Stevenson of Balmacara is similarly complimentary. 

    He notes that when the bill was first debated the minister was "if not flustered" then "not in her natural habitat". 

    However he says that since then "the feathers have grown, the plumage is sleek and groomed and now we have someone fully equipped to deal with intellectual property".

  3. Intellectual Property Bill debate begins

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now move on to the Intellectual Property Bill at report stage.

    The bill reflects recommendations made by the Law Commission on the law of unjustified threats.

    An unjustified threat is a threat to sue for intellectual property (IP) infringement which has no validity.

    Given the costs involved merely threatening to sue for IP infringement has the potential to commercially damage a rival. 

    The bill distinguishes between legitimate and unjustified threats. It also seeks to encourage negotiated settlements as an alternative to litigation. 

  4. Debate on the Wales Bill concludes

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth

    Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth responds for the government.

    Concerning Lord Rowlands' amendment he assures peers that the government would only introduce secondary legislation for "minor consequential amendments".

    Lord Howarth of Newport intervenes to suggest that specific phrase is added to the bill to help courts who may have to interpret the law.

    Lord Bourne believes this is not necessary.

    On Lord Hain's amendment he promises that the bill will not move to third reading until the Welsh Assembly passes a legislative consent motion.

    Lord Hain withdraws his amendment and debate on the bill concludes. 

  5. Wales Bill needs consent of Welsh Assembly, says Lord Hain

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hain

    Former Welsh Minister Lord Hain has tabled two amendments.

    The first states that the provisions of the bill cannot come into force until the Welsh Assembly passes a legislative consent motion agreeing to the legislation.

    The second says the provisions cannot come into force until the Treasury sets out a fiscal framework for Wales.

  6. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    As the debate comes to an end, MPs adjourn for the day.

    That's all from the Commons this evening but MPs will return in the morning bright and early at 9.30am for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs questions.

  7. Minister: Government committed to transport and growth

    Brexit and transport debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Exiting the EU minister David Jones responds to the debate.

    He responds to the calls made by several MPs for government negotiating positions on Brexit to be explained by saying that "the process we are engaged in at the moment is a process of consultation".

    Mr Jones says he makes "no apologies" for the fact that the government is giving proper consideration to the withdrawal of the UK from the EU.  

    He says that the debate has helped inform the consideration of his department and the department for transport and says the government remains committed to investment in transport and in growth for the whole UK.

  8. Tidy!

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Rowlands

    Labour peer Lord Rowlands, who served as a Welsh Office minister in the 1970s, introduces an amendment to require the UK government to allow the Welsh Assembly to scrutinise secondary legislation on devolved matters - statutory instruments giving ministers powers to act without introducing a bill in Parliament.

    However, it turns into a discussion of the Welsh term "tidy", as in "they're a tidy family", in Lord Rowlands' words.

    He says the concept of Welsh tidiness reached its zenith in the character of Mrs Ogmore-Pritchard from Under Milk Wood, who "ran a guest house but didn't believe there should be any guests coming across the threshold".

    Even if statutory instruments are simply "tidying up" measures, he continues, there is no reason why the Welsh Assembly should not scrutinise them.

  9. Labour: Government must be 'upfront' about Brexit plans

    Brexit and transport

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jenny Chapman

    Shadow Brexit minister Jenny Chapman says the government is pretending that challenges from leaving EU don't exist or are straightforward to resolve, and that ministers are "kidding themselves".

    "We need to be upfront about this and honest with the British people", she says.

    Ms Chapman adds that Labour are not going to block Article 50, but goes on to tell the minister that there is a "moral imperative" for government to "act in good faith" and share its priorities with the public and MPs. 

  10. 'This is what preparation looks like' - SNP MP

    Brexit and transport

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stephen Gethins

    SNP Europe spokesperson Stephen Gethins says the transport secretary has to bear "some responsibility" for what he calls the lack of a plan for leaving the UK leaving the EU.

    He calls the lack of planning an act of "gross irresponsibility" during the campaign, and says he is continuing it by still saying nothing "five months on".

    Mr Gethins holds up the white paper "Scotland's Future", saying "this is what preparation looks like - 670 pages of a white paper prepared during the independence referendum". 

  11. Kilmarnock and Loudoun

    Brexit and transport debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Eleanor Laing

    Robert Flello quotes SNP MP Alan Brown, whom he mentions by his constituency - Kilmarnock and Loudoun. 

    He tells MPs that he hopes he has pronounced the name correctly, saying: "I have been waiting to say that for hours".

    Unfortunately for him, deputy speaker and proud Scot Eleanor Laing calls him to order before suggesting he "have another go".

    "The honourable member tried very hard, it's not his fault but he didn't get it right", she says.

    This prompts Robert Flello to try again, but this time with a heavy Scottish accent. 

  12. Government opposes devolution of youth justice system

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Plaid Cymru peer Lord Wigley proposes a devolved Youth Justice Board for Wales, an amendment backed by Lib Dem peer Lord Thomas of Gresford.

    Opposition spokeswoman Baroness Gale notes that the Labour Welsh government wants youth justice to be devolved, but adds that Labour peers propose waiting for "the full publication of the Charlie Taylor report" into the matter.

    In September 2015 the UK government asked Charlie Taylor, former chief executive of the National College for Teaching and Leadership, to lead a departmental review of the youth justice system.

    Wales Office Minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth argues that there is "a very effective partership happening at the moment" between UK and Welsh institutions, which "appears to be operating more than satisfactorily". 

  13. Santa and the logistics industry

    Brexit and transport debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Robert Flello says he would like to thank the logistics industry in the country "for making Christmas happen".

    "It delivers everything; yes Santa has his part to play, but without the logistics industry it would not happen" he says. 

    It is due to the importance of this industry, he says, that transport is "absolutely at the heart" of the UK.

    In case MPs did not understand the strength of his views on the logistics industry, Mr Flello goes on to says that without the sector "the UK would simply cease to exist". 

  14. Debate research briefing

    Brexit and transport debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons library have produced a briefing on the debate, which you can read in full here

  15. Peers debate Wales Bill in committee

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now turn to the final part of the committee stage debate on the Wales Bill, which would devolve further powers to the National Assembly for Wales and Welsh ministers.

    Committee stage allows peers to consider the bill in detail and propose amendments.

    Debate begins on a group of amendments concerning tribunals in Wales.

  16. Minister welcomes 'genuine co-operation'

    Bus Services Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon

    Transport Minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon thanks his fellow Conservative peer Baroness Oppenheim-Barnes, who paid tribute to bus drivers in a brief intervention, and echoes her sentiments.

    He says the passage of the Bus Services Bill has not been easy with many areas of contention, but also notes "genuine co-operation and a willingness to work together" among the parties.

    Peers approve the final, technical amendment and the bill passes. This bill began in the Lords, so it will be considered by the House of Commons at a later date.

  17. Praise from the opposition

    Bus Services Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    "This is a good bill," says opposition spokesman Lord Kennedy of Southwark, adding that Labour has "made many positive changes" to it. 

  18. DUP: Airport passenger duty 'a pernicious, dirty little tax'

    Brexit and transport debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The DUP's Ian Paisley raises the issue of airport passenger duty, telling MPs he hopes the transport secretary will "whisper in the ear" of the chancellor about abolishing the tax.

    "We should not be paying this pernicious, dirty little tax" he says.

    Mr Paisley is full of praise for the actions of the transport secretary in stopping United Airlines from withdrawing Northern Ireland's only transatlantic route over the summer, but then tells MPs of the "dismay" when the EU ruled that the transport secretary's involvement amounted to state aid.

    This was one of the reasons that many people in Northern Ireland voted to leave the EU in June, he tells MPs.

  19. Deregulation of buses 'a story of decline' - Lib Dem spokeswoman

    Bus Services Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat spokeswoman Baroness Randerson sums up the third reading debate for her party.

    She argues that deregulation of bus services under Margaret Thatcher's Conservative government has meant "a story of decline" for bus services outside London, in contrast to a more regulated system in the capital.

    Baroness Randerson expresses the hope that her party's amendments have made the bill "robust enough".