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Summary

  1. Work and Pension ministerial team questioned by MPs
  2. Urgent question on child abuse inquiry
  3. Higher Education and Research Bill at report stage
  4. Peers questioning government ministers
  5. Lords then examine Pension Schemes Bill

Live Reporting

By Patrick Cowling and Kate Whannel

All times stated are UK

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  1. Video content

    Video caption: Autumn Statement: BBC editors on what to look for

    BBC editors give their views on what the Autumn Statement could hold in store.

  2. House adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate comes to an end and the House adjourns for the evening.

    That's all from us today - MPs return tomorrow at 11.30am for Foreign Office questions.

    Until then, good night!

  3. Minister responds to debate

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Financial Secretary to the Treasury Jane Ellison responds to the debate for the government.

    She says that studies have shown that the carbon footprint of shale gas will be "significantly lower" than for coal and comparable to the liquid gas that is imported.

    Ms Ellison speaks about the potential benefits of using shale gas:

    Quote Message: the shale gas resources beneath Britain could contribute to our security of supply, create jobs, and increase tax revenue - all at the same time as providing a bridge to the greener future that we all support"
  4. Shale Wealth Fund debate

    Adjournment Debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Caroline Flint

    Former shadow energy secretary Caroline Flint is now leading her adjournment debate on the purpose of the Shale Wealth Fund.

    The government has proposed that residents affected by fracking could be paid some of the profits.

    The Shale Wealth Fund was set up in 2014 to set aside 10% of proceeds to benefit host communities.

    The government is considering making shale fund payments directly to affected households.

    Environmental campaigners have described the proposed individual payments as "bribes".

    Ms Flint is proposing that the fund be used to promote energy efficiency, essentially using the profits from a fossil fuel to underwrite the shift to green energy.

  5. Bill proceeds to the Lords

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The bill is passed at third reading by 279 votes to 214, a majority of 65.

    With that the bill passes its last legislative stage in the House of Commons and now passes down the corridor to be considered by Peers.

  6. Division on Third Reading

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs divide to vote for the last time on the bill in the House of Commons, this time on whether to give the bill a Third Reading - its last legislative stage before going to the House of Lords.

  7. Labour not supporting bill at Third Reading

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Jo Johnson thanks MPs at Third Reading for their help in scrutinising and strengthening this "important and much needed bit of legislation".

    He says that the government "remains committed" to ensuring that the higher education sector keeps its international standing and says that the changes in the bill are "crucial in being able to do that".

    Shadow minister Gordon Marsden joins the minister in thanking MPs for their help in scrutinising the bill but criticises the government for not adjusting to the realities of Brexit in the bill.

    He says that instead of "strengthening and shoring up" universities, the government risks seriously undermining them by "obsessively pursuing their market ideology".

    Mr Marsden finishes by calling the bill a "lost opportunity" and says Labour will not support it at Third Reading.

  8. Lords adjourn

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Commons clock

    Lord McKenzie withdraws his amendment and debate on the Pension Schemes Bill is, for today, concluded.

    The House of Lords is then adjourned. Peers will be back tomorrow at 2:30pm for oral questions.

  9. A 'racy and intoxicating' story of Parliamentary procedure

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Bercow

    As there was no debate on the bill in the Legislative Grand Committee, the bill moves to Third Reading.

    Speaker John Bercow goes through the procedural formality of reporting the consent of the Legislative Grand Committee to those parts of the bill that were certified as England-only or England and Wales only.

    Mr Bercow stops at one point to say that he hopes MPs are paying attention to what is "quite a racy and intoxicating story". 

  10. Lord Young 'back in default mode'

    Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to a short debate on Lord McKenzie's amendment 38, Lord Young apologises for being back in "default mode of resisting".

    This amendment gives the regulator more powers over what happens to a master trust scheme in the event of a "triggering event" - an event that puts the savings of members at risk. 

    Lord Young argues that the regulator should not be allowed to overrule the trustees when resolving a triggering event. 

  11. Waht is the Legislative Grand Committee?

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Speaker must certify provisions in government bills that affect either England-only or England and Wales-only.

    Following Report Stage comes the new stage where MPs from England or England and Wales-only can veto proposals.

    A Legislative Grand Committee (LGC) considers a consent motion for any clauses that the Speaker has certified.

    This new stage allows all English or English and Welsh MPs either to consent to or to veto those clauses.

    At this stage, no amendments to the bill can be made but clauses can be vetoed by amendments to the consent motion.

    When a bill is England-only or England and Wales only, this stage allows those MPs to consent to or veto the whole bill.

    If clauses of the bill are vetoed by the Legislative Grand Committee, there is a reconsideration stage that follows that allows further amendments to be made to enable compromises to be reached.

    The whole House can participate in this stage, which is in effect a second report stage for disputed parts of the bill.

    This is followed by a second LGC at which all English or English and Welsh MPs are asked to consent to the amendments.

    If no agreement is reached at this point, the disputed parts of the bill fall.

    If a bill passes the Legislative Grand Committee then it will proceed to Third Reading. 

  12. Report stage complete

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Amendment 56 is rejected by 275 votes to 217, a majority of 58.

    That brings to an end the consideration and votes on the bill at report stage.

    Speaker John Bercow adjourns the House for "no more than five minutes" as he retires to certify which aspects of the bill come under the English votes for English laws provisions.

  13. Minister offers 'glimmer of hope'

    Pension Schemes Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord McKenzie now speaks to his amendment requiring master trusts to submit an annual governance statement to the Pensions Regulator.

    Government spokesperson Lord Young tells peers that "after five hours of debate" there is "a glimmer of hope" for one of Lord McKenzie's amendments.

    He agrees that providing such information to the Pensions Regulator would be useful but believes adding this requirement in primary legislation rather than regulations would create problems.

    He proposes that the government add this requirement to the regulations and hopes that Lord McKenzie will therefore withdraw his amendment - something which he duly does. 

    Lord Young of Cookham
  14. The votes keep coming

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Amendment 40 is rejected by 281 votes to 212, a majority of 69.

    The division bells in the Commons are not getting a rest any time soon however, as the voting bonanza this evening in the chamber continues with the SNP moving their amendment 56 to the bill.

    The amendment would require the Secretary of State to consult the devolved administrations in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland before giving directions to UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) on research priorities. 

    Natascha Engel
    Image caption: Deputy Speaker Natascha Engel reads the result of a division
  15. More voting in the Commons

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Amendment 47 is defeated by 277 votes to 216, a majority of 61. 

    Undeterred, Labour push their next amendment - amendment 40, to a vote.

    This amendment seeks to require the Office for Students to be assured about the maintenance of standards and about students’ and the public interest before issuing authorisation for institutions to grant degrees.

  16. MPs reject SNP amendment

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have rejected New Clause 14 by 280 votes to 211, a majority of 69.

    Voting is not done yet though, as Labour move their amendment 47 to the bill, and so the House divides again.

    Amendment 47 would ensure Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) measures were subject to scrutiny by, and approval of, both houses of Parliament. 

  17. Government has 'no intention' of decriminalising drugs

    Drugs policy debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Speaking for the government Baroness Williams says there is "no intention" of decriminalising drugs. 

    Concerning the example of Portugal she suggests that the success in reducing drug-related deaths cannot be attributed to decriminalisation alone.

    She adds that the country has also invested in harm reduction programmes.

    Baroness Williams
  18. Division!

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs divide to vote on the SNP's New Clause 14 to the bill.

    The amendment would require UKRI to commission research on the effects of the absence of arrangements for post-study work visas and assess how such arrangements could operate in the UK and their effect on the higher education sector and the UK economy.

    The result of the division is expected at 8.45pm. 

  19. Labour urges 'careful consideration'

    Drugs policy debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Kennedy of Southwark

    Labour spokesperon Lord Kennedy of Southwark tells the House that he is not in favour of legalising cannabis for general use. 

    He acknowledges that alcohol and tobacco may be more harmful but argues that this is not a good enough reason to legalise cannabis.

    However he urges the government to give "careful consideration" to how cannabis can be provided for medicinal use.

  20. Minister: Innovate UK and business need more cooperation

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Jo Johnson says that it would be a "huge mistake" to set up the new UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) organisation with the "innovation mission left elsewhere".

    He says that the UK needs "more and better coordination and partnership between our great research base Innovate UK and the business community - not less".

    Jo Johnson