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Summary

  1. Brexit committee meets to examine UK's stance
  2. International Development questions followed by PMQs
  3. UQ on children refugees from Calais
  4. Debates on Autumn Statement and welfare; and social care
  5. Lords start at 3pm with questions to government

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

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Alex Hunt

BBC News

A guide to plans for the UK to leave the European Union, after the 2016 referendum.

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House adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords clock
BBC

The last amendments to the Policing and Crime Bill are passed without debate or division and so the bill passes committee stage.

That brings to an end the day's business in the House of Lords.

Join us tomorrow for more live coverage of the Houses of Parliament from 9.30am when the Transport Secretary and his ministers will take questions from MPs.

Peers return at 11am, but until then good night!

Minister: New laws on digital crime 'not helpful'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

House of Lords
BBC

Home Office Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford rises once more to respond to the debate on these amendments.

She says that although she agrees with many of the points made in the debate, she does not believe that combining all digital crime laws into one statute "would be helpful or an adequate use of resources".

"I am not persuaded that the current existing criminal law in this area is actually defective" she says.

Lord Wigley accuses the government of complacency on this issue, but agrees to withdraw the amendment for now.

Digital crime amendments

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Plaid Cymru peer Lord Wigley is moving tonight's penultimate amendments which relate to digital crime.

Lord Wigley says that the amendments seek to consolidate the numerous statues that have been enacted over the past 30 years on this issue, as well as updating the law to address the most recent online behaviour.

The amendments seek to ensure that police officers are properly trained in respect of digital crime, which he says has seen "phenomenal growth" in recent years.

Digital crime
PA

Policing and Crime Bill documents

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

If you are interested in finding out more about the Policing and Crime Bill, a full list of the bill's documents - including lists of amendments, the text of the bill itself, and briefing papers by the House of Commons and House of Lords libraries, can be found here.

Minister: Amendment 'fundamentally undermines' legal rights

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Chisholm of Owlpen says she agrees "wholeheartedly" that the criminal justice system must protect victims, but says that the rule of law provides that a defendant must be given a fair trial. 

This includes the right of the accused to be informed promptly of the nature and cause of the accusation against them, she says. Not letting the defendant know the identity of their accuser "fundamentally undermines" this cornerstone of our criminal justice system, the minister says.

"That is not to say that there should not be crucial safeguards in place for victims and witnesses" Baroness Chisholm adds.

Lord Wigley responds to this answer from the government by saying that the interpretation of the amendment by the minister is "strange indeed".

He says that he will likely bring this issue back at report stage, but for now agrees to withdraw his amendment.

Anonymity for victims of serious assaults

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Wigley
BBC

Plaid Cymru peer Lord Wigley is moving his amendment 228C which has also been supported by Labour's Lord Ponsonby of Shulbrede and Conservative peer Baroness Howe of Idlicote.

The amendment seeks to ensure that the identity of a victim or witness of a serious sexual or violent offence is not given to the person accused of the offence, if it is reasonable to assume that such a disclosure would put the victim or witness at risk of further harm.

Lord Wigley gives several harrowing anecdotal examples of women who live in constant fear because the perpetrator of such a crime was given their name by police officers.

What is committee stage?

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The Committee Stage puts a bill through detailed examination and scrutiny. 

Major and complex legislation is considered in a Committee of the Whole House.

Other bills are considered in a Grand Committee away from the main chamber of the Lords.

Peers rarely form smaller standing committees to consider government legislation.

All proposed amendments can be considered and debate on amendments is unrestricted.

If the bill is passed at Committee Stage the legislation moves on to Report Stage.

Government needs to address 'soft issues' in justice system

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Chisholm of Owlpen responds to the debate for the government and says that victims of all criminal offences are entitled to support under the Victims' Code.

She also says that the Victims' Code entitles victims to being treated in a respectful and professional manner without discrimination of any kind.

The minister tells peers about increased funding for the criminal justice system and planned additions to the Victims' Code.

Baroness Brinton replies to the minister's answer saying it still does not address "the soft issues" that affect the day to day running of cases in the system.

However, after assurances that the minister will meet with her to discuss the issue further, Baroness Brinton withdraws her amendment.

'Great distress' caused in criminal justice system

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Brinton is now moving a number of amendments that relate to observance of the Victims’ Code and of better treatment of victims more generally within the criminal justice system.

Baroness Brinton tells peers many things that happen day to day in the criminal justice system that cause victims "great distress", and says that many victims feel that victimisation continues throughout the criminal justice process.

She says that the amendments seek to create a "balanced and fair justice system for all who participate in it".  

Many problems are due to inefficiencies in the system, she adds.

Baroness Brinton
BBC

Commons adjourns

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate concludes and the business in the Commons is adjourned for the day.

MPs return tomorrow at 9:30am for questions to the Transport Secretary.

Gyimah: Government will increase prison staff numbers

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Justice Minister Sam Gyimah says he is "determiend" to improve safety for officers and prisoners.

He says the current rise in violence in prisons is "unacceptable" and tells the House that the government is investing over £100m to recruit an additional 2,500 prison staff by 2018.

Drax: Practice of potting should be treated more seriously

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative Ricahrd Drax says the presence of drugs in prisons is behind much of the violence. 

He adds that it exacerbates existing mental health issues and leads to bullying and debt.

He tells MPs that drugs are smuggled in by drones, personal visits and, in some cases, "soaked in letters".

He calls for "more regular searches" of cells to be held. He also wants increased sentencing for people who assault prison officers - "a strong deterrent is needed." 

He argues that the practice of "potting" should also be treated more seriously. He explains to the chamber that the practice of potting refers to when urine and excrement are thrown at an officer. 

Richard Drax
BBC

Online child abuse amendment

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Kennedy of Southwark
BBC

Labour frontbencher Lord Kennedy of Southwark is now moving amendment 219D which he says is an "important step" in allowing police and crime commissioners to tackle the online abuse of children.

He says that only when police forces begin systematically collecting this data will we know the prevalence of the issue, and once the prevalence is known then adequate resources and appropriate services can be allocated to tackle it.

Peer: Government lacks sense of urgency

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Home Office Minister Baroness Chisholm of Owlpen responds to the debate for the government and says she recognises that there is "particular concern" in the issue of religious marriages when "one or both parties are unaware of their rights".

Baroness Chisholm says the government share the concerns raised by Baroness Cox and takes them "very seriously indeed".

Baroness Cox thanks the minister for her response but says she is concerned by a "lack of a sense of urgency" to address an issue that is currently ongoing.

The amendment is withdrawn.

Adjournment debate begins

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs now move on to an adjournment debate on prison officer safety led by Conservative MP Richard Drax.

Yesterday thousands of prison officers stopped work amid health and safety concerns. 

The protests follow a number of high-profile incidents at prisons across England, including a riot and the escape of two inmates at Pentonville Prison. 

The Justice Secretary Liz Truss has said the government is recruiting 2,500 extra officers. 

Religious marriages

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbench peer Baroness Cox is now moving her amendment 219C which seeks to ensure that religious marriages accord with the law relating to marriages in England and Wales.

Baroness Cox says that her amendment does not specify any particular religion, but tells peers that it has "specific relevance" for Muslim women who are adversely affected by what she calls the "discriminatory" rulings of Sharia courts. 

Speaking of her amendment, Baroness Cox says "it is motivated by deep concern for many women living in this country in ways that are utterly unacceptable".

Baroness Cox, and several supportive peers, tell the chamber anecdotal evidence of women who have assumed that their religious marriage ceremony was binding under English law, but find, often to their detriment, that it is not when cases of divorce or abuse arise.

Baroness Cox
BBC

MPs reject Labour motion

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reject the motion 279 votes to 200.

The government's rewording of the motion is agreed to without a vote.

MPs vote on social care

House of Commons

Parliament

The debate on social care concludes and MPs vote on the opposition motion. 

The motion calls for the government to bring forward funding to solve a "crisis" in the social care sector.

The result is expected at 7:15pm.

Mowat: UK spends 25% more on adult social care than other EU countries

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

David Mowat
BBC

Health Minister David Mowat tells MPs that according to the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) the UK spends 25% more on adult social care than the other major economies in Europe such as Germany and France.

He says that, despite higher funding levels, the system in the UK is clearly "under pressure".

He suggests that other countries do a better job of funding their care systems through long term saving and social insurance. 

Evidence about complainant’s sexual history

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Paddick withdraws his amendment and we now move on to another amendment from Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames which relates to cross-examination during a sexual offence trial of the complainant’s sexual history.

Lord Marks says there are fears that victims of rape do not want to come forward as they fear that they will be questioned about their sexual history under section 41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999.

Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford responds to the amendment, saying that cases where such questioning is allowed are "rare" and that "the legislative bar for asking such questions is high".

The amendment calls for a review of the operation of current legislation on this issue, and after a number of short interventions from Lord Kennedy of Southwark on the Labour frontbench, Baroness Williams commits the government to holding a review.

With that, the amendment is withdrawn.

2017 will be 'make or break year' for care system

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Shadow Communities and Local Government Secretary Teresa Pearce says 2017 will be a "make or break year" for the care system which she describes as "teetering on the edge of a precipice".

She tells MPs that local authorities are struggling to fulfill their statutory obligations to care for the elderly and disabled.

She says that rather than letting the system "crumble" the government "should be investing it".

Teresa Pearce
BBC

Minister: Police need to maintain 'operational independence'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Williams of Trafford
BBC

Baroness Williams of Trafford is winding up the debate on this amendment for the government.

The Home Office Minister says she recognises that those whose identity is made public when accused of sexual offences may suffer "unjustifiable reputational damage, but adds that this "should not blind us to the bigger picture".

She says that the police should have operational independence in deciding whether to name a suspect and that the amendment would hamper the ability of the police to act in this way.

She says the amendment would send a message to sexual offence victims that they are "less likely to be believed" than victims of other crimes.

She urges the amendment to be withdrawn.

Labour: Victims need to feel they can 'come forward'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Rosser
BBC

Shadow Spokesperson Lord Rosser opens by saying that the majority who have spoken in favour of the amendments "will not be in agreement" with what he has to say.

Speaking against amendment 219A, he says the absence of pre-charge anonymity enables more victims of sexual offences to feel they can come forward, and that there are examples of this in the cases of Rolf Harris and Jimmy Savile.

How the care system works across the UK

BBC Health

UK map
Thinkstock

Care in later years covers everything from help in an individual's home for tasks such as washing and dressing, to round-the-clock help in a care home or nursing home.

The way the system works is different, depending on which part of the UK a person lives in.

Unlike the NHS, services are not free. Some people aged 65 and over will get help towards their costs, but others can pay the full cost.

Read more here.

Peer: 'Culture of innocence' eroded

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Lexden
BBC

Consevative peer Lord Lexden commends peers for moving this amendment.

He says that during Operation Midland "innocent people were treated as if they were guilty".

Arguing in favour of the amendment, Lord Lexden says we need to reverse the trend which has "eroded the culture of innocence", and that amendment 219A would help to achieve such a shift. 

Caulfield: Health and social care should be jointly funded

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP and former nurse Maria Caulfield says she always "found it odd" that health care and social care funded differently.

She calls for the two services to be "jointly delivered and jointly paid for".

She tells MPs that more finance "is not the only answer" adding "we need a joint service".

Maria Caulfield
BBC

Burnham 'betrayed' by Conservatives

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP and former health secretary Andy Burnham tells MPs of his attempt to create a "national social care system".

He recounts being approached by his then shadow Andrew Lansley for cross party talks on the subject. 

Mr Burnham says he agreed and they met to discuss their ideas. One of the options considered was a levy on estates to pay for free personal care at home for the elderly.

He then says a "bombshell" was dropped a few weeks later - a Conservative campaign leaflet with the headline "Now Gordon wants £20,000 when you die" and advising people not to vote for Labour's new 'death tax'. 

He accuses the Conservatives of betraying his confidence and says the poster had a "chilling effect" on the social care debate.

"It set everything back," he says.

Campaign poster
Conservative Party

Amendment 'not the answer to the problem'

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Pannick
BBC

Labour's Lord Campbell-Savours and Conservative Earl Attlee speak at length in support of the amendment, but Crossbench peer Lord Pannick again rises to point out the legal problems that the amendment faces.

Lord Pannick agrees that there is an issue that must be addressed but says he is "not persuaded that this is the answer to the problem".

He says that publicity can lead other witnesses to come forward to provide supporting evidence in cases of sexual offences, arguing that for many victims "it is only hearing that an allegation is being taken seriously" that will help them decide to come forward.

Lord Campbell-Savours intervenes on that point to says that "surely a person can come forward during a trial" - but Lord Pannick counters to say that often these cases do not come to trial due to a lack of supporting evidence.

The crossbench peer also says that the amendment would prevent the person accused from themselves publishing the allegation against them either in outrage at the charge or to canvas for alibis of innocence.

Anonymity for those accused of sexual offences

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Paddick
BBC

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Paddick is now moving amendment 219A which seeks to introduce a similar right to anonymity for those accused of sexual offences to that currently available to victims.

Lord Paddick says the difference would be that this anonymity for the accused would only be protected up to the point of charges being made - with provision for earlier withdrawal of anonymity in cases of public interest also being made.

"The protection of the rights of survivors cannot be at the unnecessary and unreasonable denial of the rights of the accused," he says.

Betts: Health secretary is in denial

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour's Clive Betts intervenes to suggests that the health secretary does not want to talk about funding.

He argues that the experts are in agreement that there is a funding crisis in social care and accuses Jeremy Hunt of being in denial.

Mr Hunt says he is coming on to funding but points out that at the last election Conservatives pledged to spend more on health than Labour.

Hunt: Cruelty in care home system has been tolerated

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Jeremy Hunt
BBC

Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt tells MPs that problems in social care are not only about funding.

He notes that abuse in care homes was not down to funding but about "cruelty that we have tolerated in our system".

He says that the government has introduced the toughest system of care home inspections.

Government: existing powers sufficient

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Williams of Trafford
BBC

Home Office Minister Baroness Williams of Trafford tells peers that the government believes that the current arrangements "strike the right balance" between protecting victims and upholding the general principles of openness and transparency in court.

"We are not persuaded," he says, that a "sufficiently strong" case has been made for the broadening of the existing offences.

Lord Marks rises to respond to the debate and says he is "not at the moment convinced" about claims that the current compensation powers are adequate in these cases.

Despite this and a few other issues with the government position, he withdraws his amendment.

A new member of the House of Lords?

Foreign Office Minister Baroness Anelay accidentally ennobles the president-elect.

Opinions across the House

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Grender
BBC
Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Grender

Crossbench peer and leading QC Lord Pannick argues that one of the amendments in this group appears to be superfluous, as the intended offence being created is already covered in other legislation.

Liberal Democrat peer and long-time campaigner on this issue Baroness Grender rises to support the amendments, saying that as legislators "we need to create laws that foresee the way that society if changing".

She stresses the need for anonymity in these issues for the victims involved.

Former justice minister Lord Faulks says that much of the law covering 'revenge porn' was covered by existing criminal offences, but tells peers that "such was the need" to cover this specific sort of behaviour that it was included in the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.

It is too soon, he argues, since the act came into effect for there to be an increase in the definitions within those laws.

Lord Faulks
BBC
Former justice minister Lord Faulks

Keeley: Social care is in crisis

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Barbara Keeley
BBC

Shadow mental health and social care minister Barbara Keeley paints a downbeat picture of social care in the UK.

She says it is "in crisis due to a lack of funding".

She tells MPs that patients are stuck in hospital because there aren't enough places in care homes. 

She says unpaid family members have to provide increasing levels of care leaving them "isolated and burnt out".

MPs debate social care

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

We now come to today's second opposition day debate on social care.

Labour's motion urges the government to bring forward "promised funding to address the current funding crisis".

The government has tabled an amendment welcoming the fact that "the amount of money available to local authorities for adult social care services will rise significantly". 

'Revenge porn' amendments debated by peers

Policing and Crime Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames
BBC

Peers accept Commons reasons for rejecting their amendments without further opposition - due to the fact that MPs are elected and they are not.

We now come to the fifth and final day of committee stage consideration of the Policing and Crime Bill.

Liberal Democrat peer Lord Marks of Henley-on-Thames is moving the first batch of amendments today, which seek to tighten up the laws on "sexting" and revenge pornography.

Sexting is the name given to the transmission of sexually explicit images between individuals, and revenge pornography refers to the act of making intimate and explicit images of an individual public without the permission of that person.

Lord Marks says that these amendments would bring the bill in line with equivalent legislation in Scotland, as they broaden the scope of what type of explicit images come under current laws about the disclosure of such images.

He says that the amendment aims to increase public awareness and to ensure that police forces take these offences seriously. 

Labour motion rejected

Opposition Day Debate

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have voted to reject the Labour motion 284 votes to 265.

The motion is subsequently agreed to with the government's amended wording, which states that MPs note "the role of universal credit in ensuring that work pays". 

Where is the bill now?

Investigatory Powers Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

The Commons and the Lords have been engaged in ping pong over the Investigatory Powers Bill, and an amendment that would bring into force a recommendation of the Leveson Inquiry into press standards.

Opponents have said that the recommendations, which are currently in law elsewhere in statute but not in effect, could lead to publications being sued and having to pay their opponents' costs, even if they win.

MPs rejected amendment 15 dealing with civil claims for interception of personal data - phone hacking.

MPs argued that the amendments were not appropriate until section 40 of the Crime and Courts Act was enacted.

Section 40 deals with the award of costs for claims against a publisher when there is an national press regulator.