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Summary

  1. Treasury Committee MPs question Bank of England governor Mark Carney.
  2. Health ministers questioned by MPs
  3. Urgent question on prison officer protests
  4. Transport secretary makes statement on new HS2 routes
  5. MPs consider Lords changes to Investigatory Powers Bill
  6. Small Charitable Donations and Childcare Payments Bill examined
  7. Peers sit at 2.30pm for questions
  8. Wales Bill examined in the House of Lords

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Julia Butler

All times stated are UK

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  1. House adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    House of Lords clock

    Despite only being two groups of amendments short of completing committee stage of the Wales Bill, the government whip stands up to adjourn the House for the evening.

    That's all from us today - join us tomorrow for prime minister's questions in the Commons and the Policing and Crime Bill in the Lords.

    Until then - good night!

  2. Amendment withdrawn

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Minister Lord Bourne responds to the debate on this amendment for the government.

    He highlights the differences in circumstances between Wales and both Scotland and Northern Ireland. In Scotland, he says that the main airports Glasgow and Edinburgh are much further from nearby English airports than Cardiff airport is from similar airports in England such as Manchester, Bristol and Liverpool.

    In the case of Northern Ireland, Lord Bourne says that passengers have the option of travelling to Dublin.

    The minister says that there was not a plausible way to devolve Air Passenger Duty to Wales whilst mitigating the impact this would have on regional airports in England.

    Despite his disagreement, Lord Rowe-Beddoe withdraws his amendment.

  3. Air passenger duty

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Crossbench peer Lord Rowe-Beddoe is moving amendment 96 which seeks to devolve powers over taxes on air passengers, known as Air Passenger Duty. These are powers that both the Scottish Parliament and Northern Ireland Assembly have.

    Lord Rowe-Beddoe says that the implementation of the tax is "an example of the asymmetrical devolution of powers that have been thrust upon Wales".

    He argues that the ability to abolish this tax could provide a "much needed boost to the Welsh economy".

    Liberal Democrat transport spokesperson Baroness Randerson calls the tax "a tale of two airports" - Bristol and Cardiff. She says that it is often argued that allowing Cardiff to drop Air Passenger Duty would adversely affect Bristol airport.

    Baroness Randerson argues however that these two airports are "102 kilometres apart".

    "And they are not easy kilometres" she says.

    Lord Rowe-Beddoe
  4. 'Constructive responses' from the minister

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Morgan of Ely

    Shadow Wales Office Minister Baroness Morgan of Ely has moved a group of three amendments that seek to devolve powers over the Community Infrastructure Levy; the compulsory purchase of land; and regulation over building standards.

    Baroness Morgan says that if these powers are not devolved, it will cause "unnecessary difficulties across a range of devolved activities".

    Minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth responds to the debate saying that on the first issue regarding the funding of infrastructure through the Community Infrastructure Levy, the government is prepared to devolve this power to the Welsh Assembly.

    On the remaining two amendments, Lord Bourne continues the collegiate tone of tonight's debate by offering to discuss the matters further with the Opposition before report stage.

    Baroness Morgan thanks the minister for his "constructive approach" on the three amendments and withdraws them in light of his comments.

  5. The Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Wales Bill devolves more powers from the UK Parliament to the National Assembly for Wales.

    The bill has already passed through the legislative stages in the House of Commons and implements the government's policy of a "reserved powers" model for devolution in Wales.

    The bill amends the Government of Wales Act 2006 and makes changes to the roles of Welsh ministers.

    It implements the elements of the St David's Day agreement which require legislative changes, and the majority of the recommendations of the Silk II report on the powers of the Welsh Assembly have been adopted.

    A commission headed by Paul Silk examined further devolution for Wales.

    The bill grants powers to the Welsh Assembly to alter income tax, without a referendum, and devolves the responsibility of deciding what the legislature should be called to the Assembly.

    The bill also devolves responsibility to the Welsh Assembly for ports policy, speed limits and taxi registration, as well as powers over all elements of Assembly elections.

    Responsibility to Welsh ministers for energy projects off the coast of Wales is devolved, as are powers over the licensing of onshore oil and gas extraction.

    Flag of Wales
  6. S4C amendment withdrawn

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Minister Lord Bourne says that broadcasting is difficult to fit into devolution settlements as it is, by its nature, "international, national in the UK, and national in Wales".

    He says that because the Welsh government "do not seem to be seeking" this amendment and that it was not included in the St David's Day talks on Welsh devolution, he will discuss the matter further with Lord Wigley to see what can be done on this issue.

    With these assurances Lord Wigley withdraws his amendment.

  7. The future of S4C

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Plaid Cymru peer Lord Wigley is now moving his amendment 67 which seeks to give the National Assembly for Wales oversight of Welsh language broadcasting and other Welsh language media. 

    Lord Wigley says that the survival of the Welsh language is "a miracle".

    "But it's a struggle that has to be perpetually re-fought and re-won from day to day" he says.

    Lord Wigley refers specifically to S4C; the Welsh-language public-service media outlet that is broadcast across Wales.

    Lord Wigley
  8. 'A change in tone'

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    After a number of supportive contributions from Lib Dem and Labour peers, including from the Labour frontbench, Minister Lord Bourne responds to the debate on these amendments.

    Lord Bourne says that it is "imperative" that we have good employment law and good employment relations, but says "we need a simple unified system across the UK". 

    He says that currently public sector workers in Wales are able to be paid more or given more holidays, and that there are "no plans to take that power back".

    Lord Hain responds to the debate saying that he is disappointed by what he calls "a change in tone" in the minister's answer to the debate.

    The Labour peer eventually agrees to withdraw his amendment but promises to return with it at report stage if there is not "significant movement" on the issue.

  9. Tory peer: Bill needs to provide clarity

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Baroness Finn speaks against the amendment, arguing that it would, in effect, create two tiers of employment in public services in Wales.

    Baroness Finn says that the key purpose of the Wales Bill is to provide clarity over power and accountability of those powers. She says that Lord Hain's amendment would only confuse matters as it would be "unworkable" to have two different standards of employment law.

    Baroness Finn
  10. Wales Bill returns

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Hain

    Former Labour Secretary of State for Wales Lord Hain is moving his amendment 66 to the bill. The amendment seeks to allow the National Assembly for Wales and the Welsh government to have control over terms and conditions for employees in devolved public services.

    Lord Hain says that the amendment does not challenge the government position that employment law should be reserved to the UK government.

    He accuses the UK government with interfering with the legislative competence of the National Assembly and the Welsh government.

    The Labour peer says that his amendment merely seeks to ensure that the Welsh government "can run its public services, and its industrial relations that are so crucial to those public services, as it wishes to".

  11. Who is the odd one out?

    Dinner break business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Culture, Media and Sport Minister Lord Ashton of Hyde responds to the debate, and begins by thanking Baroness Royall for referencing his "non-conformist, suffragist, pacifist great-great Aunt" who was the first woman to be elected to Manchester City Council.

    "I think the underlying subtext is - what went wrong?" the Conservative minister says ruefully, to laughter from peers in the chamber.

    Lord Ashton says that the government "is keen to support the Arts", but says that for regional culture this is usually channeled through Arts Council England.

    Between 2015-18, Lord Ashton says that Arts Council England will invest £118 million in museums, and also outlines other avenues open to the People History's Museum, and other similar museums, of funding from government.

    Lord Ahston goes on to say that the People's History Museum is "a great success".

    Lord Ashton of Hyde
  12. People's History Museum 'tells the story of British democracy'

    Dinner break business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Monks, former chair and current trustee of the People's History Museum, speaks at length about the importance of the museum in telling the story of the evolution of British democracy. 

    "It's a story of pressure from below in which this House found itself on the wrong side of history in many cases" he says.

    Lord Monks says that in the museum "roam the great figures of the Whig, Tory, Conservative, Liberal and Labour Parties".

    He refers to the government cuts to museums that have affected the People's History Museum, and says that unless the minister has "something in his back pocket tonight" he fears there is "nothing on the horizon" to help the museum.

  13. Preserving working people's culture

    Dinner break business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Clark of Windermere

    Labour's Lord Clark of Windermere and Conservative peer Lord Balfe speak in the debate about the importance of preserving the culture of working people.

    Lord Clark speaks with passion about the fact that history has been taught for many years as a top-down subject with no access or sense of ownership for working people. He tells peers that "time and time again" he found that working people's organisations destroyed records instead of preserving them, but says that "gradually we are winning that battle".

    Tory peer Lord Balfe praises the People's History Museum for its scope in not just recounting the socialist and Labour Party history of working people.

    "Over 30% of the working class are Conservative voters" he says.

    Lord Balfe
  14. What is the People's History Museum?

    Dinner break business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The People's History Museum in Manchester is the UK's centre for the study of the history of working people.

    The museum holds collections on the history or democracy, women's suffrage and the co-operative movement.

    The museum houses the Labour History Archive and Study Centre, which includes Labour Party archives.

    The museum preserves the world's largest trade union banners collection at its textile conservation studio.

    100,000 people visit the People's History Museum each year.

    The People's History Museum was recently awarded a Resilience Fund grant of £273,600 by the Arts Council.

  15. People's history museum debate

    Dinner break business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The dinner break business is now being discussed on the floor of the House, with tonight's debate being on recognition and future security of museums such as the People's History Museum.

    Labour peer Baroness Royall of Blaisdon, who is chair of the Manchester museum, is moving the debate and tells peers about the cuts in government funding that the museum has faced. She asks the minister why there is a lack of consistency in the way in which museum funding is allocated.

    Baroness Royall of Blaisdon
  16. Government response on railway amendments

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bourne of Aberyswyth responds to the debate on this group of amendments.

    On Baroness Randerson's amendment he says that provisions in the bill are not intended to modify the Assembly's current competence on this issue, and says that devolution could be "impractical and costly" on these matters. 

    As regards Baroness Morgan's amendment 109, Lord Bourne says that the Railways Act 1993 does not stop not-for-profit organisations from bidding for rail franchises, but does stop public sector organisations from doing so.

    The minister says it would be "premature" to reach a decision on this matter before agreement is reached between the UK and Welsh governments.

  17. Public sector bids for rail franchises

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Shadow Minister Baroness Morgan is pushing her amendment 109 to the Wales Bill, which is part of this group of amendments concerning rail infrastructure.

    The amendment seeks to give the Welsh government, which is becoming a franchise issuing authority under provisions in this bill, powers to allow public sector organisations to bid for rail franchises.

    She accuses the government of having an ideological aversion to rail nationalisation.

    Baroness Morgan says that Labour also support Baroness Randerson's amendment.

  18. Lib Dem: devolution for rail infrastructure vital

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    BBC
    Image caption: Baroness Randerson

    Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Randerson is moving amendment 57A, which deals with the transport, in particular the rail network, in Wales.

    Her amendment argues for a clear system of training, testing and certification for the transport system in Wales.

    This is vital if we are to "have an effective railway system in Wales", she says.

    She also notes that road safety training should be devolved to the National Assembly for Wales.

  19. Peer: UK has no national energy strategy

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Howarth of Newport

    Labour peer Lord Howarth of Newport said it would be impressive if the government did not want to devolve heating and cooling powers because it would impact on a national energy policy - but that is not the case. 

    The peer says that the UK has "no national energy policy" and since 2010 energy policy has consisted of "prolonged dithering" and argues that such powers should be devolved.

  20. Heating and cooling powers 'best delivered at a local level'

    Wales Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Morgan of Ely

    Shadow Wales spokesperson Baroness Morgan moves amendment 56 and 57 which remove the lines in the bill which refer to the reserving of legislative powers for heating and cooling energy systems at UK level. 

    She says not devolving such powers will cause problems in the National Assembly for Wales' ability to deliver their climate change targets.

    "This is an area best delivered at a local level," she argues.