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Summary

  1. MPs questioned Home Secretary Amber Rudd
  2. Main business was Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill
  3. Urgent question on NHS funding
  4. Two statements - on work assessments and Nissan
  5. Peers examined Investigatory Powers Bill and Wales Bill

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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House of Lords adjourns

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Hain withdraws his amendments and debate ends for the day.

Peers return from 2:30pm on Tuesday for questions.

Later they will debate the Pension Schemes Bill.

Day ends in the Commons

House of Commons

Parliament

Minister Gavin Barwell says that Circle, the housing association at the heart of Rushanara Ali's complaint, is taking action to improve its performance but it is "still not good enough". He promises to help ensure that her constituents get the "services they have every right to expect".

And that's it for the Commons today. MPs return at 11:30 tomorrow morning for justice questions.

The man business of the day will be consideration of Lords amendments to the Investigatory Powers Bill.

'Members subject themselves to the laws they are passing' - Lord Hain

Wales Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Wales Office Minister Lord Bourne says he was "determined to live in the area I represented" when he was a member of the Welsh Assembly.

He says the debate on the amendments has raised "valid points for the Assembly to look at" but the matter is not for the House of Lords.

Labour peer Lord Hain says that, when he proposed the amendments, he had "no idea it would provoke such a rich debate".

But he says the main principle is that Assembly members "subject themselves to the laws they are passing...by living within Wales".

Labour front bench suggests 'further thought' on amendments

Wales Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour spokeswoman Baroness Gale says the amendments being debated have only been tabled now because previously "nobody believed that somebody elected to the Welsh Assembly would not be Welsh or living in Wales. It's never happened before."

However, she argues that "further thought" is needed about whether legislation is required in this area.

'It's not all about Neil Hamilton' says former Welsh secretary

Wales Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Neil Hamilton
BBC
UKIP Assembly member Neil Hamilton

Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Randerson says she supports Assembly members living in Wales but notes that a number of candidates in the past have lived outside Wales until they took up their seats.

"Until this Assembly term it has always been taken for granted that you would live in Wales," the former Assembly member tells the House.

She backs an amendment from Plaid Cymru's Lord Wigley, which would require an elected Assembly member to be "recorded on the electoral register as living in Wales by the time they have been sworn in".

Labour peer Lord Murphy addresses the elephant in the room. "It's not all about Neil Hamilton, but it is a bit about him."

Neil Hamilton, a former Conservative MP for Tatton in England, now sits as a UKIP Assembly member. In July reports that Mr Hamilton could have some of his living costs paid by the taxpayer, despite not living in Wales, prompted criticism from Plaid Cymru AM Bethan Jenkins.

Adjournment debate on social housing

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP for Bethnal Green and Bow Rushanara Ali is leading an adjournment debate on social housing to end the day in the Commons.

She says tenants in her consitutency were left without heating and hot water by Circle Housing, the housing association that administers much of the social housing in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.

She says her constituents "have now had enough".

Keith Vaz confirmed as Justice Committee member

Justice Committee motion

House of Commons

Parliament

The attempt to upend the Commons convention that seats on select committees are a party matter comes to nothing. The motion passes by 203 votes to seven.

So Keith Vaz is confirmed as a member of the Justice Select Committee, alongside his Labour colleague Kate Green.

Amendments to require Assembly candidates to live in Wales

Wales Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Crickhowell
BBC

Peers are debating amendments tabled by two former secretaries of state for Wales: Labour peers Lord Hain and Lord Murphy of Torfaen.

The amendments would prevent someone being a candidate for, or a member of, the Welsh Assembly "unless the person is recorded on the electoral register as living in Wales".

Conservative peer Lord Crickhowell objects, arguing that, for example, a member of the Army who is posted away from Wales would not be able to stand.

He gives an another hypothetical example of someone who works in Monmouth and uses the area's schools and medical services, yet "lives just across the Wye Bridge and he's therefore living in England. He's disqualified from standing."

In addition, a number of Welsh towns "straddle the border", the peer adds.

Politicians 'can only blame ourselves' for poor image, says Andrew Bridgen

Justice Committee motion

House of Commons

Parliament

After a lengthy backwards and forwards between Andrew Bridgen and the Speaker over which subjects are "proper and legitimate to raise" when discussing Keith Vaz's proposed seat on the Justice Committee, Conservative MP Mr Bridgen finishes his speech by addressing the Speaker directly.

He says that the Speaker has "often said" that "this place must reflect the society for which we make the laws". A candidate for a select committee seat with "so much hanging over him" should not be considered for a prestigious position, he adds.

Mr Bridgen asks the House to reject the appointment. If it does not, MPs "can only blame ourselves" if the people have a low opinion of politicians, he argues.

After his speech, MPs divide to vote on the motion. If accepted, it would see Keith Vaz and Labour colleague Kate Green appointed to the Justice Select Committee.

Keith Vaz select committee appointment will harm 'perception of politics' - MP

Justice Committee motion

House of Commons

Parliament

Andrew Bridgen
BBC

Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen begins his speech by saying that since he has been in Parliament, the Speaker has often reminded the House "how important the public perception of the behaviour of members is in fashioning the public perception" of politics and politicians.

He says he does not believe that "the member for Leicester East joining the Justice Committee will do anything for the perception of politics", due to stories about him in a tabloid newspaper, that forced his resignation from the Home Affairs Committee.

The Labour chief whip, Nick Brown, intervenes to say that Keith Vaz is the choice of the Labour Party to fill the seat, and questions whether it's in order for a non-Labour MP to object.

The Speaker says it is "in order" for Mr Bridgen to object and allows him to continue.

MP seeks to block Vaz select committee appointment

House of Commons

Parliament

In a highly unusual move, Conservative MP Andrew Bridgen is seeking to oppose the appointment of Leicester East Labour MP Keith Vaz to the Justice Select Committee.

Keith Vaz stepped down from his position as chairman of the Home Affairs Select Committee last month after newspaper claims about his private life.

In normal circumstances, changes to the membership of select committees are nodded through by MPs at the end of a day's business.

Mr Bridgen told the Sun he would oppose Mr Vaz's appointment because "MPs need to know that the world is watching and judging".

Peers debate powers over cross-border health authorities

Wales Bill

Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth
BBC

Peers are debating amendments to allow the Welsh Assembly to legislate on four cross-border health authorities without requiring the consent of the UK government.

The changes would recognise the bodies as serving both England and Wales says minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth, who is a former member of the Welsh Assembly himself.

Cultural Property Bill passes second reading

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

After a winding up speech from minister Tracey Crouch, MPs pass the uncontroversial bill at second reading without a division.

The 'contents' have it

Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2016

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Storey is not reassured by the education minister's speech and says he "wishes to test the opinion of the House" - in other words, to put the matter to a vote.

However, the cries of "content" are loud and followed by no audible cries of "not content", so the regret motion passes without a vote.

The House adjourns for a short break before resuming debate on the Wales Bill.

Minister wishes to 'dispel myths'

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Nash
BBC

Education Minister Lord Nash says he is happy to set out the government's "reasons for collecting this data and dispel some of the myths and fearmongering".

He claims that collecting information on school pupils' nationality, country of birth and level of English will help ministers "understand how we can give all pupils a better education".

"We don't fully understand the impact of migration on the education system, and we should," he tells the House.

About orders and regulations

Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2016

House of Lords

Parliament

Major laws in the UK pass through Parliament in the form of bills before becoming acts of Parliament. This is known as primary legislation.

Statutory instruments (SIs) allow ministers to alter an act without introducing a whole new bill.

Such secondary legislation is laid before either house in the form of draft orders or regulations.

A "motion of regret", such as the one tabled by Liberal Democrat Lord Storey tonight, enables a protest to be lodged against regulations and a debate to take place, but does not strike them down. This would require a "motion to annul".

Labour spokesman claims ministers knew plans were 'politically sensitive'

Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2016

House of Lords

Parliament

Labour spokesman Lord Tunnicliffe says that the regulations were introduced just before Parliament rose for the summer recess in July - suggesting, in his view, that ministers realised they were "politically sensitive".

He adds: "Denials of any ulterior motive do not sound convincing."

Lord Tunnicliffe also asks if the additional "burdens" on teachers and costs have been considered.

'Teachers are not border guards' says crossbench peer

Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2016

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbench peer the Earl of Clancarty speaks in support of Lord Storey's motion to "regret" the regulations.

He says the regulations are "fundamentally intrusive in the same way that listing foreign workers would be".

The government dropped proposals - announced at the Conservative conference - to force firms to disclose what percentage of their workforce is non-British, as a way to encourage them to hire more locals.

"Teachers are not border guards," the Earl of Clancarty argues.

Bill will 'enhance our reputation in the world'

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Conservative MP Robert Jenrick says the bill is about far more than just protecting cultural heritage.

He says that illicit trade in looted antiques is "interwoven with the arms trade, the drugs trade, with people trafficking" and that tackling it is "part of tackling extremism and part of tackling serious organised crime and terrorism".

He also says that enacting the legislation will "enhance our reputation in the world".

Peer claims school regulations have 'the hallmarks of racism'

Education (Pupil Information) (England) Regulations 2016

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Storey
BBC

Statements are over and peers are now taking part in a debate on regulations requiring schools in England to record information about pupils' nationality, country of birth and proficiency in English.

Opening the debate, Liberal Democrat peer Lord Storey says there may be good reasons to check a pupil's ability at English, but the idea that schools are "required to collect en masse every child's country of birth is quite frankly, unbelievable".

He says the change takes place "against a backdrop of a massive increase in anti-immigration rhetoric" and alleges that the plan has "all the hallmarks of racism".

He also questions what safeguards exist to stop the information being shared outside the Department for Education.

Greg Clark stands by refusal to publish Nissan letter

Nissan's Sunderland plant
Getty Images
Nissan's Sunderland plant opened in 1986

Peers are hearing repeats of today's Commons statements, including on Nissan. Earlier in the Commons, the business secretary said he will not publish his letter to Nissan because it contains sensitive commercial details.

Greg Clark told MPs companies had to be confident their plans would not be shared with their competitors.

Nissan has said two new car ranges will be built in Sunderland, saving thousands of jobs, after "support and assurances" from the government about the UK's future outside the EU.

Labour attacked the "backroom deals" and demanded the letter's release.

Read more.

Labour's 'homage' to ancient Babylon?

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Ed Stone
PA

Conservative MP Tim Loughton jokes that Labour's notorious "Ed Stone", unveiled during the 2015 election campaign, could be viewed as a "homage" to the stele of Hammurabi, erected by the king of Babylon in the 18th Century BC.

When Labour spokesman Kevin Brennan suggests later that the UK does not have "entirely historically clean" hands when it comes to the taking of cultural artifacts, Mr Loughton bristles at the mention of the Elgin, or Parthenon, Marbles.

Mr Loughton argues that the Elgin Marbles "would not exist" if the British Museum had not saved them. He also claims that "substantially more" people see them for free at the British Museum that visit the Parthenon in Athens.

Mr Brennan jokes that he doesn't want to get into the matter further: "I spend my whole life starting fights and running away from them, Mr Speaker. That's what happens when you're quite small."

Parthenon Marbles
Reuters
The Parthenon Marbles, a collection of stone objects, inscriptions and sculptures, also known as the Elgin Marbles, are displayed at the British Museum in London

Bill will send 'a clear signal' that the UK values cultural property - Labour

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Kevin Brennan
BBC

Shadow heritage minister Kevin Brennan says the last Labour government produced a draft bill which "unfortunately" ran out of parliamentary time.

He welcomes the new bill, adding that ratifying the Hague Convention will send a "clear signal" that the UK values cultural property.

Mr Brennan mentions the destruction by the Taliban of the Buddhas of Bamiyan in Afghanistan and destruction caused by so-called Islamic State of the ancient ruins of Palmyra in Syria.

However, he calls for clarification over whether the bill would apply to these acts as they were not carried out by "recognised states".

MPs debate bill to protect cultural artefacts in wars

Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Karen Bradley
BBC

Statements are over and MPs turn to the Cultural Property (Armed Conflicts) Bill at second reading.

The bill enables to UK to implement the Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict of 1954, and its updated protocols of subsequent years. The convention requires parties to respect both their own and others' cultural property during conflict.

Opening the debate, Culture, Media and Sport Secretary Karen Bradley says that a nation's heritage and cultural artifacts "are part of what makes a country great". She says the convention was prompted by widespread destruction of artefacts during the Second World War.

She tells the House that the UK signed the convention but "decided not to ratify because its terminology was deemed to be insufficiently clear" - a problem resolved by the later protocols. 

MPs welcome post-referendum economic developments

Nissan in Sunderland statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Two supporters of leaving the EU, from different parties, welcome economic developments since the referendum.

Labour's Kelvin Hopkins says the news about Nissan is good for the whole of the UK and says that exports are aided by a "welcome depreciation of sterling" since the EU referendum.

DUP MP Sammy Wilson, whose party backed leaving the EU, says that "thousands of jobs have been created, despite the predictions of the doom-mongers".

SNP MP: 'There's no deal for Scotland'

Nissan in Sunderland statement

House of Commons

Parliament

"There's a deal for Nissan but there's no deal for Scotland from this government," says SNP MP Ian Blackford.

Greg Clark says that "all parts of the United Kingdom need to benefit from our industrial success in the future".

He claims the UK government's City Deals in Scotland are examples of successful partnerships. 

Nissan news welcomed by Sunderland MP

Nissan in Sunderland statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP for Houghton and Sunderland South Bridget Phillipson welcomes the news on behalf of many of her constituents. She asks what the government will do to protect the plant's supply chain, thought to support 28,000 jobs in the north east. 

Greg Clark says he's "already done quite a lot on that" and knows how important the "whole ecology of business" around Nissan is to the area.

Rudd: 'No case for statutory inquiry' on Orgreave

Chris Matheson accuses Amber Rudd of "leading families up the garden path" over Orgreave.
The home secretary tells MPs there will be "no statutory inquiry or independent review" into the so-called Battle of Orgeave, during the 1984 Miners' Strike.

But Labour MP Chris Matheson accused Amber Rudd of "leading families up the garden path for the last two years", before she told urged him "not to leap to anger quite so quickly" as she explained her decision.

Tariff free access for all?

Nissan in Sunderland statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Hilary Benn
BBC

Labour's Hilary Benn, chairman-designate of the Brexit Committee, says that the deal is good news but Nissan is "only one company" that will want tariff free trade. 

He asks if "his offer of tariff free access to the European market will be available to all other parts of the manufacturing sector" or if the government is planning different strategies for different sectors.

Greg Clark says giving companies tariff free access is "not in my gift" and that he was describing what the government would consider a good outcome. 

He says he and his ministerial team will be touring the country speaking to businesses to "make sure we understand what's important to them".

Coming up...

Parliamentary service tweets

Labour accuses government of lack of transparency

Nissan in Sunderland statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Clive Lewis
BBC

Labour's shadow business secretary Clive Lewis says it is "fantastic news for Sunderland, and fantastic news for the country as a whole" as well as a great tribute to the workforce at the plant. But Labour has some concerns. 

He says that Greg Clark has not been "transparent" over what he's offered Nissan and that the government must have a Brexit strategy that's very convincing, if it convinced Nissan to stay - and so he asks why Parliament can't know what it is. 

He asks the government to "show us the letter".

In reply, Greg Clark says he's surprised that the Labour Party is "so miserable" and can't "congratulate everyone involved on a success that is in all our interests". He says that he's "set out the information" that he gave to Nissan.

He adds that it's his responsibility as Business Secretary to "attract investment" to the UK.

Minister making statement on Nissan

House of Commons

Parliament

Workers at the Nissan plant in Sunderland
AFP/Getty Images

Business Secretary Greg Clark is making a statement on the Japanese carmaker Nissan's announcement it would make two new models in Sunderland.

He says it's the "latest in a series of investments" in Britain that "prove we are open for business" and that it's "hard to think of more unambiguously good news".

Greg Clark told the Andrew Marr programme yesterday that he had kept Nissan onside by telling them that post-Brexit the UK would be aiming to "ensure that we have continued access to the markets in Europe and vice versa without tariffs and without bureaucratic impediments".

Today's announcement

Government department tweets

Action urged on 'pitifully small' disability employment rate

Disability and work statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour backbencher Stephen Timms says that the number of disabled people in work is "pitfully small" and asks how long they expect to take to half the disability employment gap.

Work and Pensions Secretary Damian Green says it's "premature of me to set targets" but the government is taking practical steps to increase employment among disabled people such as "more than doubling the number of disability employment advisors".

A new app will make it quicker and easier to see how MPs have voted in Parliament.
A new app will make it quicker and easier to see how MPs have voted in Parliament.

Move away from 'binary choice' disability benefits system

Disability and work statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Iain Duncan Smith
BBC

Iain Duncan Smith, work and pensions secretary from 2010 until his resignation earlier this year, says he wants to "unreservedly welcome the statement". 

He says he wants the government to consider the difficulties of there being a "binary choice" in the benefits system between people being fit to work or too sick. He asks if it's feasible to "move away from that binary choice". 

Damian Green says he's "very grateful for support" from one of his predecessors who is "quite right about the binary choice". 

He says that under the universal credit system "we have the capacity to be much more flexible" so that "people are not simply put in one group or another and then left there".

Bid to split England and Wales into separate jurisdictions

Wales Bill

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Wigley
BBC

Lord Wigley's next amendment would create separate legal jurisdictions of Wales and England.

The two UK nations currently form one legal jurisdiction, with Scotland and Northern Ireland as separate jurisdictions.

The Plaid Cymru peer argues there is "a need to address the diversion of Wales and England".

What's going on with welfare and benefit changes?

Conservative Penny Mordaunt and Labour's Debbie Abrahams on welfare and benefit changes.
Welfare reform was a centrepiece of David Cameron's programme when the Conservatives entered office in 2010. Now the Theresa May government has announced plans to help more disabled people into employment, in a "targeted and personalised" way.

Daily Politics presenter Jo Coburn looked at the changes to welfare being considered, and then heard from Conservative Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work, Penny Mordaunt, and the shadow work and pensions secretary, Debbie Abrahams.

Government 'kicking issue into the long grass'

Disability and work statement

House of Commons

Parliament

Debbie Abrahams in the House of Commons
BBC

Labour's Debbie Abrahams says the government is "kicking the issue [of supporting disabled people] into the long grass". She says Mr Green is the third secretary of state to promise this, but once again it is "talk, no action".

She says the government is responsible for a negative attitude towards disabled people with a "shirker scrounger narrative" and that many will feel anxiety about "coded messages" in this consultation.

Damian Green says he's "disappointed" with "how completely out of touch" Debbie Abrahams is. He cites support from organisations like Scope, Arthritis Research UK and the Work Foundation as evidence.