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Live Reporting

By Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

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  1. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate comes to a close and that brings to an end another week's business in the Houses of Parliament.

    Our live coverage will return on Monday with Home Office questions in the Commons and the daily oral questions session in the House of Lords.

    If you are in need of more parliamentary coverage, BBC Parliament's weekly round up programme The Week In Parliament will be on at 11pm - and then available on the BBC iPlayer from tomorrow.

    But until next week, good bye.

  2. 'Can't do a deal for one and not for the other'

    Video content

    Video caption: Labour's Barry Gardiner on reports of government help for Nissan to invest in the UK.
  3. What are urinary tract infections?

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are common infections that affect the bladder, the kidneys and the connected tubes.

    Anyone can get a UTI but they're particularly common in women, who can experience them regularly.

    UTIs can be painful and uncomfortable, but usually pass in a few days and can be treated with antibiotics

  4. Neighbourly support

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jeremy Corbyn

    Hornsey and Wood Green MP Catherine West introduces her debate with thanks to her neighbouring MP, the member for Islington North, for being present in support.

    Not sure who that is?

    Well, Ms West's neighbour is better known as Mr Jeremy Corbyn, Leader of the Opposition.

  5. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Steve McCabe's bill runs out of time for consideration as we hit the 2.30pm mark. 

    We now move on to the adjournment debate which is being led by Labour MP Catherine West on the subject of testing regimes for chronic urinary tract infections.

    Adjournment debates are short debates held at the end of a day's business and are used to bring constituency matters to the attention of government ministers.

  6. Running out of time...

    Protection of Family Homes Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Marcus Jones is still on duty and is responding to this bill.

    He says that the government has a number of policies in place and in development already to deal with some of the issues that the bill seeks to address, such as the Neighbourhood Planning Bill, which is currently at committee stage in the House of Commons.

    Mr Jones seems to be planning to speak until 2.30pm, which would lead to the bill running out of time and not progressing past second reading.

  7. What does the bill do?

    Protection of Family Homes Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The bill makes provision about guidance to local authorities on when to take action for breaches of planning law by seeking to clarify guidance on the scope of permitted development rights.

    The bill makes provision about rights and entitlements, including of appeal, for people affected by such breaches and to establish financial penalties for developers who breach planning law.

  8. Debate on Protection of Family Homes Bill begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Steve McCabe

    With a little over 30 minutes left for private members' bills consideration today, Labour's Steve McCabe rises to move his Protection of Family Homes (Enforcement and Permitted Development) Bill.

    He says that he has a "good idea of what to expect" as a Friday veteran of the Commons - referring to the notorious difficulty of bringing a private members' bill through its second reading successfully.

  9. Homelessness Reduction Bill gets second reading

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Bob Blackman sums up the debate for his bill's second reading by thanking support from the frontbenches, as well as charities such as Crisis and St Mungo's.

    He says that this bill will go towards eradicating what he calls the "social disease" of homelessness.

    The bill passes its second reading without opposition.

  10. Funding for the bill assured

    Homelessness Reduction Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Marcus Jones

    On the issue of funding, which has been one of the hottest topics of the day's debate, minister Marcus Jones assures MPs that there will be new funding made available to local authorities for them to discharge the new duties in the bill.

    Mr Jones responds to interventions from the Labour frontbench and from the chair of the Communities and Local Government Committee on this issue by saying that the government will engage with the Local Government Authority on how best to provide funding.

    He also promises to involve charities and other service providers in the process so as to ensure that help is being provided in the correct way.

  11. Minister responds to the debate

    Homelessness Reduction Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Marcus Jones

    Minister Marcus Jones is now on his feet responding to the bill, which has the support of the government.

    Mr Jones says that the government will seek collaboration with a wider range of services to develop "new innovative ways" of fighting homelessness, in what he calls a "very strong package of local support".

    The minister says that better coordination on policy to tackle homelessness within government as well as improved data collection will help to understand the nature of the issue and how best to address it.

  12. A few ideas for the minister

    Homelessness Reduction Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Thangam Debbonaire

    Bristol West MP Thangam Debbonaire makes a detailed speech in just short of two minutes - calling for government to tackle homelessness by, to name but a few points, dealing with land banking, removing arbitrary borrowing limits councils have for building homes, releasing public lands for building on, reforming the private rented sector and tackling low income and insecure employment.

    Just a few ideas for the minister to chew on there...

  13. An idea of how to pay for the bill

    Homelessness Reduction Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP James Cartlidge keeps his remarks brief and concise - saying that many of the points he had wanted to make have already been made by earlier speakers.

    Mr Cartlidge says he wants to suggest a method by which the provisions in the bill could be paid for, which is an issue that has been raised by many other MPs. 

    He suggests that the profits from the government's help to buy scheme and other housing support policies should be redirected to help to pay for the additional costs of the bill.

    Paying for the bill in this way would ensure that "the whole of society benefits", he says.

    James Cartlidge
  14. SNP MP outlines additional considerations

    Homelessness Reduction Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Alison Thewliss

    The SNP's Alison Thewliss, the party's city spokesperson, says she is pleased to add her name to the bill as a member of the select committee who scrutinised it.

    She says there are issues still to be addressed; while the bill makes a contribution to the debate, there is a lack of action on the causes of homelessness.

    Lack of supply of homes is one which Bob Blackman points to, and she says that in Scotland 33,490 homes have been built, including social housing.

    The young people who gave evidence to the committee on the issue said more council housing was needed; as well as better regulation of the private sector, she says.

    She also says the government should see the availability of supported accommodation is continued; as well as reconsideration of the removal of housing benefit for some younger people aged 18 to 21-year-olds. 

  15. Local problems outlined by MPs

    Homelessness Reduction Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liz Kendall

    Labour's Liz Kendall pays tribute to her local council in Leicester, who work hard to halt homelessness. Like many others, she points out that there is a cost in providing help and advice. "The government must fund the provisions of this bill," she says.

    Conservative James Berry says constituents had asked him to attend the debate today.He goes on to say that street homelessness is one of the issues he is contacted about; but that while it should not be around in 2016, it is a small aspect of the problem.

    In terms of scale, he says, it is "what you might call 'technical homelessness'" - when a family who become homeless because they are evicted by a private landlord, but cannot afford to continue to rent a home in the area. He says the waiting list in his constituency of Kingston is 9,000 - and some families on that list have been waiting for a decade.

    James Berry
  16. Calls for government funding for bill

    Homelessness Reduction Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    East Ham MP Stephen Timms tells the chamber that he saw four people asleep in the tunnel from Westminster tube station to the Houses of Parliament on his way in this morning, which he said was a "stark visual reminder of the problem we face".

    Whilst welcoming the bill, Mr Timms joins other MPs from both sides of the House, including Labour's Helen Hayes and Conservative Mary Robinson, in asking for assurances from the government that the new financial burdens in the bill will be borne by central rather than local government.