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Summary

  1. Commons day began with Treasury questions
  2. Transport secretary made a statement on airport expansion
  3. MPs then debated the Criminal Finances Bill
  4. The House of Lords began with oral questions to ministers
  5. Peers then debated the National Citizen Service Bill

Live Reporting

By Aiden James, Alex Partridge and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Following agreement of another statutory instrument, on the Contracts for Difference energy scheme, the House adjourns for the night.

    Peers will return tomorrow from 15.00 for questions, followed by consideration of amendments at committee stage of the Policing and Crime Bill. 

  2. Peers debate expanding legal aid availability

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are now debating a statutory instrument intended to expand the availability of legal aid.

    The regulations enable certain cases judged to have a 45-50% chance of success to be funded by legal aid, as long as they are of "overwhelming importance to the individual" or have a wider public interest, according to minister Lord Keen of Elie.

  3. 'Big task ahead' for National Citizen Service

    National Citizen Service Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    "NCS does not, and should not stand alone" says Lord Ashton of Hyde as he winds up the debate for the government. He says it must be one of a range of opportunities for young people to volunteer.

    He says it has a "big task ahead". The government intends to expand the scheme from 80,000 places annually to 300,000.

    He responds to points made by the Lib Dem peer Baroness Barker earlier, on why so much money was being made available to the NCS. Lord Ashton of Hyde says the scheme is "unique" and "requires special effort" to get right. "We think it is money well spent, and we hope to grow it in a sustainable way."

    Lord Ashton of Hyde
  4. NCS must be 'seen to be independent'

    National Citizen Service Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour frontbencher Lord Stevenson of Balmacara says the legislation must ensure the NCS is "independent and is seen to be independent".

    He adds that this will be crucial if the NCS is to become the "rite of passage we all hope it will be".

    He mentions a few avenues Labour will be exploring during committee stage on the bill, such as a legal structure for "full-time volunteers", as in France, Germany and the United States. 

    He says the UK currently punishes young volunteers by branding them "NEETS" (not in education, employment or training). 

  5. Peer questions funding for NCS scheme at time of cuts

    National Citizen Service Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem frontbencher Lord Wallace of Saltaire begins his speech by paying tribute to the "very worthwhile" NCS scheme. 

    He says the job of Parliament isn't to assess the scheme itself, but the legislation and the organisation.

    Like some other peers, he talks about cuts made to youth services and asks how increased government funding for the NCS can be justified in that context. 

    Lord Wallace of Saltaire
  6. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The day in the Commons comes to an end.

    MPs are back on Wednesday from 11:30am, when their day starts with Northern Ireland questions.

    At noon, Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn go head-to-head at Prime Minister's Questions.

    There will also be two opposition day debates: on tax credits firm Concentrix and on the humanitarian situation in Yemen. 

  7. Minister rules out a 'Department for Veterans'

    Adjournment debate on care for veterans

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mark Lancaster

    Defence Minister Mark Lancaster responds to calls for a new government department for veterans.

    "The needs of veterans straddle Whitehall boundaries and national borders," he says.

    "I fear a Veterans' Ministry would duplicate work that already exists."

    He says that it is "a positive step" that responsbility for veterans is spread across government departments.

  8. Will plans 'stretch' NCS too far?

    National Citizen Service Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Lucas says that the proposals for the National Citizen Service would give it "considerable power" but he does not "see that reflected in this bill at all". He says he hopes the government can clarify, so that the rest of the voluntary sector can have confidence.

    Fellow Conservative Baroness Vere of Norbiton says the government's plans are "hugely ambitious" but is worried that "growth will stretch the resources of the NCS".

  9. Zac Goldsmith resigns

    The Treasury has released a statement saying Zac Goldsmith has been appointed "Steward and Bailiff of the Three Hundreds of Chiltern." 

    It continues: "The Chancellor has also granted Mr Goldsmith’s request to be released from this appointment today."

    The parliament website explains the significance of the office:

    "An MP who wishes to resign has to go through the process of accepting a paid office of the Crown, which automatically disqualifies the MP from holding a seat in the House of Commons.

    "If an MP indicates that they wish to resign, the Chancellor of the Exchequer grants either the Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Chilterns Hundreds or Crown Steward and Bailiff of the Manor of Northstead by means of a written warrant, in the presence of a witness."

  10. Zac Goldsmith quits as MP over Heathrow decision

    Zac Goldsmith

    Conservative MP Zac Goldsmith has resigned, forcing a by-election in his constituency in a protest against the government's backing for a new runway at Heathrow Airport.

    Mr Goldsmith will run as an independent and Conservative sources said the party would not field a candidate.

    The Richmond Park MP and ex-London mayoral candidate has long campaigned against expanding Heathrow.

    But Transport Secretary Chris Grayling has ruled out any rethink.

    Read more.

  11. Adjournment debate on care for veterans

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Johnny Mercer

    Conservative MP Johnny Mercer leads today's final debate, which is on the role of Government in the veterans' care sector.

    Mr Mercer, an Army veteran himself, says he challenged Theresa May when she was running to lead the Conservative Party over her policy on care for veterans.

    He says he understands the government's focus on leaving the EU, but is concerned that the focus on veterans' care is being "diluted". 

  12. National Citizen Service to be 'normal part of growing up'

    National Citizen Service Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The former Prime Minister David Cameron will be chair of the National Citizen Service's patrons, in what he called his "first role after politics".

    Mr Cameron was Prime Minister when National Citizen Service was set up in 2011 and it formed a part of his "big society" agenda.

    Writing in the Telegraph earlier this month, he said he hoped National Citizen Service could become a "normal part of growing up for every teenager".

    David Cameron campaigning in the Witney by-election, triggered when he resigned his seat in Parliament
    Image caption: David Cameron campaigning in the Witney by-election, triggered when he resigned his seat in Parliament
  13. Minister invites MPs to 'lively debate' in committee

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Brandon Lewis says he looks forward to "a lively debate" as MPs examine the Criminal Finances Bill in detail at committee stage.

    The bill passes second reading without opposition.

  14. Overseas territories will commit to more tax transparency - minister

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Brandon Lewis

    Home Office Minister Brandon Lewis welcomes cross party support for the bill, saying MPs speaking in the debate have "understood the importance of these powers and been vocal supporters of this bill".

    He insists UK law enforcement and tax authorities will have "real-time" access to information on beneficial ownership - or who owns what investments and assets - in the UK's overseas territories.

    "Those territories have agreed that they must commit to new global standards on tax transparency," the minister tells MPs.

    As a result, he adds, HMRC has new data on "billions of pounds of accounts... held in overseas territories by UK taxpayers".

  15. Labour: UK is 'the most secretive tax jurisdiction'

    Criminal Finances Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rupa Huq

    Labour MP Rupa Huq sums up the debate on the Criminal Finances Bill for the opposition.

    "We are not planning to divide the House this evening," she says, signalling Labour's acceptance of the broad principles of the bill.

    However, she says that the UK, including its overseas territories and Crown dependencies, is "the most secretive tax jurisdiction in the world. That is not a record to be proud of."

    "We need full transparency," she says. "This bill does not go far enough."

    Ms Huq urges the government to set out proposals for the UK's overseas territories, adding: "Countries in the developing world lose three times as much as they receive in aid to tax havens."

  16. Lord True: Heathrow expansion not the cheapest option

    Airport expansion statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord True rattles off a list of concerns with the decision to expand Heathrow airport instead of Gatwick.

    He says that the expansion of Gatwick would have been cheaper, would have taken less time and would have affected fewer people than the expansion of Heathrow.

    Lord True also says that the people living near Heathrow "accept 500,000 flights a year over their heads and do their bit for the national interest".

    Minister Lord Ahmad agrees that Heathrow expansion is more expensive, but says that it also offers greater benefits than the alternative options. 

    Lord True
  17. 'Loudest voices not necessarily most representative' - Labour peer

    Airport expansion statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Soley

    Labour's Lord Soley says that he has lived near Heathrow's runways for forty years and represented the local area for twenty. 

    He tells the minister that "the loudest voices are not necessarily the most representative" in the surrounding region. 

    Lord Soley says that many people in the areas near the airport realise the benefit of expansion in terms of jobs and skills.

    The Labour peer appeals to opponents of Heathrow expansion to "put the national need above the local issues". 

  18. Position of Catholics in Northern Ireland

    House of Lords EU Select Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Bertie Ahern

    Lord Boswell asks whether losing their EU citizenship might have an isolating effect on the Catholic minority in Northern Ireland. 

    Bertie Ahern says the EU's positive effect on people's mindset in Northern Ireland "cannot be overstated".

    He says European Union membership made the "physical connection" between British and Irish leaders easier, leading to more meetings between them. 

    John Bruton says that Northern Ireland will be the only place not in the EU where every person will be entitled to EU citizenship (by being able to obtain an Irish passport). 

  19. Image of politics 'not enhanced' by announcement

    Airport expansion statement

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Rosser tells the House that the "image of politics in this country has not been enhanced" by today's announcement in favour of Heathrow, in the light of previous "emphatic" statements against a new runway by senior Conservative Party figures in the past.

    He asks if the promised year-long consultation period could lead to a "change of heart" from the government and asks if any of the other options being considered by the government are still possible. If this is the case, "uncertainty will continue for another year" he says.

    Lord Rosser
  20. Main difficulties for UK-Ireland relations post-Brexit

    House of Lords EU Select Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    Lord Boswell of Aynho

    Lord Boswell of Aynho, above, asks the first question, asking what the Irish leaders see as the main difficulties in maintaining British-Irish relations post-Brexit, and whether they think it would be worthwhile to seek a specific bilateral deal as part of the negotiations.

    John Bruton says access to the ECHR is a vital part of the Good Friday Agreement. 

    He says EU membership means there's also effectively no border in the island of Ireland at present. 

    He says he is open to bilateral agreements in other areas, but says that the economic effect of Brexit on the Republic of Ireland is likely to be negative. 

    Some studies have suggested Ireland could see a greater economic loss than the UK, he says, which "understandably" has generated some negative feeling. 

    Bertie Ahern says about 42-43% of "indigenous" Irish companies' exports go to the UK. He also says the UK market is "absolutely crucial" to agricultural industries. 

    He returns to the subject of the Good Friday Agreement, saying that it contains provisions for differences and disputes to be resolved "at an EU level".

    Mr Ahern finishes off by saying that there is plenty of coordination to be done on the Irish side. He says it's necessary that the Irish government have its own Brexit minister.