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Summary

  1. Commons day began with communities questions
  2. Theresa May updated House on last week's EU summit
  3. Home secretary to make statement on Calais migrants
  4. MPs then debated bill to control costs of medical supplies
  5. Peers started their day with questions to the government
  6. House of Lords then debated Bus Services Bill

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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  1. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That ends today's business in the Commons.

    The House will sit from 11:30am on Tuesday, beginning with Treasury questions.

    MPs will also debate the Criminal Finances Bill at second reading. 

  2. Minister: Trust placed in special measures

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister Philip Dunne says Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust has been "rated inadequate" by the Care Quality Commission and placed in special measures.

    Peter Kyle, the Labour MP for Hove, intervenes to say there are examples of "extreme failure in many different parts of our health system in Brighton and Hove".

    Mr Dunne says an NHS "sustainability and transformation plan" will allow for "much greater collaboration" in Brighton and the wider area.

    Conservative MP Tim Loughton says that, when services such as the non-emergency transport service are contracted out to the private sector, "much better due diligence needs to be done".

    He adds that, with the ambulance service unable to take on the service, there is a lack of other providers to take over provision for patients. 

  3. Carline Lucas attacks NHS 'marketisation'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Caroline Lucas

    Caroline Lucas, the MP for Brighton Pavilion, says problems in the health service in Brighton and Hove will be made worse by the winter.

    The Green Party's co-leader also criticises "privatisation" and "marketisation" of the NHS.

    Ms Lucas singles out the "non-emergency patient transport service", which is run by private providers.

    She claims the service has seen patients complaining of poor service and "some sub-contractors complaining of not being paid".

  4. Adjournment debate begins on NHS 'crisis' in Brighton

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs pass the Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill at second reading.

    It will be considered in detail by a committee of MPs at a later date.

    MPs deal with the remaining items on the order paper, before Green Party MP Caroline Lucas rises to introduce her adjournment debate on NHS provision in Brighton and Hove.

    She describes an "ongoing NHS crisis which is affecting my constituency and the city of Brighton and Hove". 

  5. Minister welcomes cross-party consensus

    Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Philip Dunne

    Health Minister Philip Dunne says the bill concerns "a treasured national institution, our National Health Service, and the need to get the best value for the taxpayer".

    He says it is unusual to debate the NHS with the "degree of consensus that has erupted across the House".

    The minister indicates that the government does plan to amend the bill in later stages to address some concerns, such as how information is shared with the devolved administrations. 

  6. End of the day in the House of Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's the end of the day in the Lords. Peers return tomorrow at 2:30pm for questions, followed by debate on the National Citizen Service Bill.

  7. 'No desire' to commercialise Royal Parks

    Royal Parks motion

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ashton of Hyde says there's "no desire" among the government to commercialise the Royal Parks more than they already are. He goes on to outline the government's position, explaining that they believe that contracting out the Royal Parks will make it easier to raise funds.

    A number of peers were worried that the Royal Parks would have to seek more private events like Winter Wonderland and the summer concerts currently held in Hyde Park.

    Labour frontbencher Lord Stevenson of Balmacara says that he's been "persuaded by the arguments" and withdraws his regret motion.

  8. Labour backs the bill but voices concerns

    Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Barbara Keeley

    Shadow health minister Barbara Keeley says the House has heard some "staggering examples" of price rises in generic drugs during debate on the bill.

    She is concerned that the bill's measures "fail to take into account the unique characteristics of medical devices" and hopes that this will be addressed as the bill progresses through Parliament.

    Ms Keeley says planned cuts to public funding for community pharmacies might have an impact on their ability to provide information to the NHS on the cost of drugs.

    "They do not have teams of administrative staff who can respond to inquiries for information," she says, calling for any costs to be "fully met by the NHS".

    However, she indicates that Labour supports the bill's broad aims.

  9. A 'fellow socialist' intervenes

    Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Rob Marris continues the opposition's teasing of the Conservatives over the Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill, and its aim to control the cost of drugs for the NHS.

    After Tory MP Kevin Foster accuses some drug companies of "profiteering", Mr Marris intervenes on his "fellow socialist".

    He asks Mr Foster if there are other parts of the economy in which he would like "to address the issue of profiteering".

    Mr Foster suggests jokingly that the Speaker might rebuke them for "going off the subject". Returning to the bill, he says the NHS is the only customer in this case and some drug manufacturers are "profiteering from illness and pain".

    Mr Marris intervenes again to allege that the charge could be levelled at some parts of the defence supply industry as well.

  10. Peers debate Royal Parks changes

    A wild deer in Richmond Park, London
    Image caption: A wild deer in Richmond Park, London

    Peers are now debating a motion on legislation to create a new charitable body to run the publicly-owned Royal Parks.

    Crossbencher the Earl of Clancarty says he's worried that this may be a step along the road to there being no government subsidy for the parks.

    The Royal Parks are: Hyde Park, Kensington Gardens, Richmond Park, Bushy Park, St James's Park, Green Park, Regent's Park, Greenwich Park, Brompton Cemetery, Victoria Tower Gardens and Grosvenor Square Garden, all in London. 

  11. 'Every new drug creates NHS cost pressure' - SNP

    Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Philippa Whitford

    "Europe has become the biggest research network in the world," says SNP health spokeswoman Philippa Whitford, adding that the UK has been the biggest beneficiary of this.

    "But obviously every new drug they discover creates an additional cost pressure for the NHS," she continues.

    She says she has "a few concerns" about how the bill's provisions will work across the whole NHS and asks for assurances that data will be shared with the Scottish government.

  12. Amendment on 'national strategy for local bus services' defeated

    Bus Services Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    There's a comfortable win for the government on an amendment by Labour's Lord Whitty, which would require a "national strategy for local bus services".

    The strategy would set out "the objectives, targets and funding provisions for rural, urban and inter-urban local bus services over the next 10 years".

    The amendment is defeated by 174 votes to 72. 

  13. Health secretary welcomed as a 'Corbynista'

    Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Justin Madders

    Shadow health minister Justin Madders says the bill aims to control the cost of medicine and close "loopholes" which have allowed "blatant abuses".

    He adds: "I only hope this increased appetite for state intervention in the market...will spread more widely across government."

    Mr Madders jokes that Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is a "fully-fledged Corbynista".

  14. Government defeated on municipal bus companies

    Bus Services Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have voted to remove a ban on councils creating municipal bus companies by 192 votes to 180, a margin of just 12 votes.

    It is another government defeat in the House of Lords. 

  15. Peers vote on municipal bus company ban

    Bus Services Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are voting on Labour's Amendment 111 to the Bus Services Bill, which would ditch Clause 21 of the bill altogether.

    The clause is the one that's caused the most controversy in an otherwise uncontroversial bill. It would ban councils from creating their own bus companies to run services.

    Although most bus services in England are privately run, a number of areas including Ipswich, Reading and Nottingham have council-owned bus companies. 

    Reading and Nottingham rank in the top three places in the country outside London for bus usage. 

    Peers voting in the House of Lords
  16. Debate begins on bill to control cost of medicines

    Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt is beginning debate on Second Reading of the Health Service Medical Supplies (Costs) Bill, which he says is intended to "control the cost of health".

    The bill is aimed at improving the voluntary and statutory price control schemes for medicines bought by the NHS. 

    The Department of Health believes the changes could save the NHS around £88m a year. 

    Jeremy Hunt
  17. Minister promises action on audiovisual aids on buses

    Bus Services Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    In response to an amendment to the bill that would make audiovisual aids on buses mandatory, minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon says that the government doesn't believe it is right in this bill. 

    He says the government intends to amend the Equality Act 2010 "as quickly as possible" to make a similar change, so that across Great Britain "every passenger can board a bus with confidence".

    Some buses feature on board announcements of the route number, final destination and stops, both in audio and on screens, but only 19% of buses feature the technology, the majority of those in London.  

    Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
  18. Lib Dem leader calls for children to be able to sponsor parents to come to UK

    Calais statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat leader Tim Farron says he wants to "challenge" the notion that human trafficking is the cause of the migrant crisis.

    He also says the UK does not offer unaccompanied refugee children "the right to sponsor immediate family, including parents, to join them" and urges a policy change to help keep families together.

    Home Secretary Amber Rudd says she accepts that human trafficking is only one of the causes of the problem.

    She says there are "no plans to change" the policy on sponsoring relatives. 

    Tim Farron
  19. All migrants and refugees need to be 'screened' - Tory MP

    Calais statement

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Sir Roger Gale says he has housed refugees in the past and the policy should not be entered into "lightly".

    He calls for every person entering the UK to be "screened". 

  20. Close of Calais camp not 'a long-term solution' - SNP

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Joanna Cherry

    SNP home affairs spokeswoman Joanna Cherry welcomes progress on accepting child refugees.

    She also pays tribute to charities and NGOs working in the camp.

    However, she adds that removing the camp does not equate to "a long-term solution" to the migrant crisis.