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Summary

  1. Lords committee on EU rights
  2. Day started with Foreign Office questions
  3. MPs debated motion on the BBC
  4. Peers started with oral questions
  5. Lords examined Children and Social Work Bill at report stage
  6. Home Affairs Committee questioned Professor Alexis Jay

Live Reporting

By Aiden James, Alex Partridge and Kate Whannel

All times stated are UK

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  1. House adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    A final group of government amendments brings debate on the Children and Social Work Bill to an end and the House adjourns for the night.

    Peers return on Wednesday from 3pm to put questions to the government.

    They will then embark on the final day of report stage debate on the Investigatory Powers Bill.

    Before all that, the House of Commons will meet from 11:30am and Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn will face each other for Prime Minister's Questions at noon.

  2. Requirement to notify review panel about abuse or neglect

    Children and Social Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Nash introduces a final group of government amendments, including one requiring a local authority in England to notify the Child Safeguarding Practice Review Panel if it "knows or suspects that a child has been abused or neglected" and the child dies or is seriously harmed.

    Labour’s Baroness Wheeler says her party “broadly welcomes” the proposals.

  3. Regulations reflect concerns over profit-making - minister

    Children and Social Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Education Minister Lord Nash says concerns over profit-making "are reflected" in existing regulations.

    A government amendment to the bill should "put the point beyond doubt", he claims.

  4. Bid to prevent profit-making organisations delivering children's services

    Children and Social Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Debate resumes on the Children and Social Work Bill with an amendment which would prevent social services for children being delivered by profit-making organisations.

    The amendment has Labour, Lib Dem and crossbench backing.

  5. 'We are not turning our backs on the world'

    The effect of Brexit on peace and stability in Europe

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Goldie

    The UK will be the first country to leave the EU, says Baroness Goldie, replying for the government.

    "We are in uncharted territory."

    But she insists the UK will "remain an outward-facing nation and a force for good" and leaving the EU will not change the UK's "global engagement".

    The statement that the UK is leaving the EU but not leaving Europe "might sound like a platitude", she adds, "but it's something we should remind ourselves of". 

    Quote Message: We will not be pulling up the drawbridge or turning our backs on the world."
  6. 'Necessary to suffer pain for the long-term good'

    The effect of Brexit on peace and stability in Europe

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Farmer

    Conservative Lord Farmer says he supports leaving the EU but is not "cavalier" about the risks - though he thought they were overstated.

    "Sometimes it is necessary to suffer pain and some disquiet for the long-term good," he tells his fellow peers.

    He argues that the EU is a political as well as an economic project and the UK was being "sucked into a process we were never democratically signed up to".

    Lord Farmer also says a poll by Lord Ashcroft showed the most important issue for a majority of Leave voters was the belief that decisions about the UK should be taken in the UK - while "less that one-third" said immigration was the most important issue.

  7. Bishop attacks referendum's 'misrepresentations and misleading promises'

    The effect of Brexit on peace and stability in Europe

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Eurosceptics are still thin on the ground in the chamber, as Liberal Democrat peer Lord Wallace of Saltaire says: "The EU is now as central to western security as Nato."

    He claims the UK has "no credible foreign policy" and "no credible foreign secretary".

    The Bishop of Leeds says the referendum campaign featured "misrepresentations and misleading promises, now apparently acceptable in a so-called post-factual world".

    He argues that a country cannot be secure without considering the security of its neighbours.

    Bishop of Leeds
  8. Brexit a blow to the stability of Europe, says Tory peer

    The effect of Brexit on peace and stability in Europe

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Helic

    Conservative peer Baroness Helic also puts pro-EU arguments in her speech.

    The Bosnian-born politician says: "I believe that our withdrawal from the EU is a blow to our international influence and the stability of our continent."

    EU membership enables the UK to "punch above our weight", she adds.

    However, she cautions against being "despondent" and says: "It is right that the government has rightly committed itself to making the best out of Brexit."

  9. The effect of Brexit on peace and stability in Europe

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Collins of Highbury

    Debate on the Children and Social Work Bill adjourns while some peers have their dinner, and others take part in a short debate during the dinner break.

    Labour foreign affairs spokesman Lord Collins of Highbury has tabled a question asking ministers "what assessment they have made of the potential effect on peace and stability in Europe and around the world of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union".

    In the opening speech of the debate, he argues that the EU's international development programmes enable the UK to "magnify" its influence.

    He asks whether Brexit will mean the Department for International Development extending its bilateral aid programmes.

  10. Commons adjourns for the night

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business in the House of Commons is over.

    MPs return tomorrow morning at 11:30am for Wales questions, followed by Prime Minister's Questions.

  11. Labour peer congratulated as she takes up new job in the US

    Children and Social Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Education Minister Lord Nash confirms that the government will pay child benefit to adopted children, regardless of limits which would normally apply.

    He wishes Labour's Baroness King and her family luck as they head to California, where she is to take up a job with YouTube.

    Labour spokesman Lord Hunt of Kings Heath congratulates her on succeeding in changing the minds of ministers.

  12. Lasting peace starts with 'small steps'

    Humanitarian situation in Yemen

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    International Development Minister Rory Stewart is replying to the debate.

    On the ceasefire, due to start on Thursday for 72 hours, he says it's "not enough", but adds that "the only way we do peace or conflict resolution is starting with small steps".

    This is why the UK is "strongly supportive" of the ceasefire, which they hope will be the prelude to a broader political settlement, he says.

    "The only real solution here is going to come from the Yemeni people themselves," he adds.

  13. Labour peer welcomes government concession before she leaves the Lords

    Children and Social Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness King of Bow

    Labour peer Baroness King of Bow speaks to her amendment to require child benefit payments to be paid for adopted children, regardless of any limits on the number of children in a family which normally applies to child benefit.

    Baroness King says she has never met a middle class foster family.

    "Of course they exist but they're not the norm," she says. "The norm is that low-income families foster Britain's most vulnerable children." Such families also step in to adopt them, she adds.

    She argues that "it really would be unforgivable for us to further reduce the income of those families", who are looking after children "on behalf of the whole country", by reducing child benefit.

    Baroness King, who is to take a leave of absence, welcomes the government's acceptance of the arguments before she departs the Lords. "It's been a privilege to influence debate," she says.

  14. Yemen situation raised in Parliament

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    A Houthi militaman in Sanaa, Yemen
    Image caption: A Houthi militaman in Sanaa, Yemen

    Labour's Keith Vaz is introducing an adjournment debate on the humanitarian situation in Yemen.

    Yemen's President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi has been fighting Houthi rebels, who currently control the country's capital, Sanaa. The President has the support of a Saudi led coalition, who recently bombed a funeral in Sanaa, killing 140 people.

    A 72 hour truce is due to begin on Thursday.

    Keith Vaz tells the house that in the course of the conflict 1,200 children have been killed, 3 million people are suffering with acute malnutrition and 3.2m people are internally displaced.

    Keith Vaz is one of three MPs who were born in Yemen, the others are his sister Valerie Vaz and Flick Drummond, the Conservative MP for Portsmouth South.

  15. MPs submit pension changes petitions

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are now submitting petitions on behalf of women born in the 1950s affected by the changes to pensions in the 1995 and 2011 Pensions Acts. The women are eligible for their state pension later than they thought they would be, some at very short notice. The petitions call for "fair transitional arrangements" for all women affected.

    MPs submitting their petitions tonight are Tommy Sheppard (SNP), Peter Kyle (Labour), Lucy Allen, David Nuttall (both Conservative) and Tom Elliott (Ulster Unionist Party).

    Tommy Sheppard
    Image caption: The SNP's Tommy Sheppard submits a petition on behalf of residents of his Edinburgh East constituency
  16. MPs vote against a 'Scottish Six'

    BBC charter renewal debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The SNP amendment calling for a "Scottish Six" news programme on BBC One is defeated by 270 votes to 53.

    MPs then agree the motion, that the House approves the draft BBC charter agreement, without a vote.

  17. Amendment defeated by nine votes

    Children and Social Work Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have voted 188 to 179 to reject the amendment - that's a majority of nine.

    Debate now moves to a group of government amendments.

    Lord Nash explains that these amendments "expressly clarify" that a local authority must proactively offer support to every care leaver every 12 months.

  18. MPs vote on 'Scottish Six'

    BBC charter renewal debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are voting on the SNP's amendment to today's motion. The amendment calls for "maximum devolution of broadcasting" and for the BBC to introduce a six o'clock news bulletin specifically for Scotland.

    Winding up the debate minister Matt Hancock said that it is "vital that the BBC is editorially independent" and that a vote for the amendment is "a vote for political control of the BBC".