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Summary

  1. MPs questioned the new Treasury team; followed by an urgent question on the situation in Turkey answered by new minister Sir Alan Duncan
  2. Higher Education and Research Bill passed its second reading.
  3. Peers questioned ministers as the first item on the day's agenda; followed by committee stage of the Investigatory Powers Bill.

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

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  1. End of business in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's it from the House of Lords for today - it sits again tomorrow at 15.00 BST when the government faces questions on: 

    • Southern Rail and disabled passengers 
    • delays in payments from the Single Farm Payment Scheme
    • UK universities and their students and staff from EU member states
    • threatened demolition of the Calais Jungle camp.
  2. Appointment of judicial commissioners

    Investigatory Powers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Baroness Hamwee introduces an amendment to make the appointment of judicial commissioners a matter for the judiciary, saying she wants to avoid the role being "politicised". 

    Labour's Lord Rosser asks for clarification of the way commissioners are reappointed or dismissed. 

    Justice spokesman Lord Keen of Elie says the Lib Dems' proposals would alter the relationship between the prime minister and commissioners "to an unacceptable extent". 

  3. Government rejects investigatory powers commission

    Investigatory Powers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Deputy Lords Leader Earl Howe rejects proposals for setting up an investigatory powers commission rather than commissioners, saying he is "unconvinced of what practical good this would do". 

    He adds the new body would incur "bureaucracy" and "extra costs" and, in his view, would not enhance independence. 

  4. Peer argues for dedicated oversight body

    Investigatory Powers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Green peer Baroness Jones of Moulsecoomb introduces an amendment which would set up an investigatory powers commission rather than commissioners. 

    She says this would help avoid "potential conflicts of interest" where commissioners would both be responsible for authorising surveillance and for overseeing it. 

    A dedicated separate body would make "oversight more independent", she tells the House. 

  5. Peer return to Investigatory Powers Bill

    Investigatory Powers Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers approve the measures to implement the fifth carbon budget, and to propose a limit on the number of carbon units that may be used to meet the third carbon budget.   

    They return to committee stage of the Investigatory Powers Bill.

  6. Climate change threat 'has not been downgraded'

    Climate change orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe

    Responding, Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe insists climate change has "not been downgraded as a threat".

    "The title of a department matters far less than its DNA and what it does," she tells peers, and the government is "committed to ratifying the Paris Agreement as soon as possible". 

    Nearly 170 countries signed the Paris Agreement at the UN, setting in motion events that could see the treaty operational within a year.

    The UN says the expected record turnout for the signing shows overwhelming global support for tackling rising temperatures.

  7. Labour backs carbon budget measures

    Climate change orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Grantchester

    Opposition spokesman Lord Grantchester says Labour will back the moves to implement the fifth carbon budget, and to propose a limit on the number of carbon units that may be used to meet the third carbon budget.  

    However, he criticises "sudden lurches" in renewables policy which he says impact investment confidence, and asks why the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs did not feature more prominently in departmental reorganisation following last week's reshuffle. 

  8. Peer criticises climate change 'myths'

    Climate change orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Lawson welcomes Theresa May to her new post and says she has made an "excellent start" by abolishing Department for Energy and Climate Change. 

    He finds it "bizarre" these orders are being approved as the Climate Change Act is based on "myths". 

  9. End of Commons business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have concluded their business for the day. 

    They will return at 11.30 BST on Wednesday ahead of Theresa May's first Prime Minister's questions.

  10. Dee Estuary management 'an issue we take seriously'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Environment Minister George Eustice

    Environment Minister George Eustice argues it  is "not practicable" to divide the management of the Dee Estuary between England and Wales.

    Cockle stocks move around the estuary between the Welsh and English sides and fishing these would be "less efficient with two management bodies involved".

    He adds that the management of the Dee Estuary for English fishermen is "an issue we take seriously" and tells MPs he has asked the Environment Agency to attend all future meetings related to the cockle bed.

  11. DECC dissolution 'a dreadful blow'

    Climate change orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Featherstone

    Lib Dem Baroness Featherstone says she's "pleased and relieved" that the government is acting to bring forward the fifth carbon budget. 

    But she calls the dissolution of the Department for Energy and Climate Change a "dreadful blow" which sends the "wrong signal". 

  12. Cross-border accountability

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Justin Madders says the issues facing Dee Estuary fishermen are because devolution "fails to address the important problem of cross-border accountability".

    He criticises the Environment Agency, who he says have "been aware of the problems "for some time" but "seem unwilling to act". 

  13. Peers debate 'overdue' climate change measures

    Climate change orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are being asked to approve the Draft Carbon Budget Order 2016 and the Draft Climate Change Act 2008 (Credit Limit) Order 2016.  

    Presenting them to the House, Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe says they are "overdue" because of the "extraordinary events" of the past few weeks. 

    While she concedes Brexit will present "challenges" in climate change policy, she stresses the government remains "committed" to this area.

    The Carbon Budget Order 2016 implements the fifth carbon budget recommended to the government by the Committee on Climate Change, an independent body established under the Climate Change Act. This budget sets a target for what are technically known as anthropogenic carbon dioxide equivalent emissions for the period 2028-32.

    The second order proposes a limit on the number of carbon units (55 million) that may be used to meet the third carbon budget (which runs from 2018 to 2022).  

  14. Dee estuary cockle beds closures last season

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Strict restrictions on the number of cockle fishing licences were introduced in 2008

    Last year a "serious drop" in cockle stocks on the Dee Estuary in Flintshire led to a cap on collecting the shellfish.

    Illegal cockle-picking and over-harvesting in 2014 are some of the factors being blamed for the move.

    Ms Greenwood tells MPs that cocklers were still charged a full licence fee even though the cockling period was limited to "just a few days".   

    It is the first time since 2008 the cockle beds have been closed to commercial pickers, which also was the first year a tough new licensing regime was introduced.

    The industry is worth an estimated £40,000 a year to cockle-pickers, who are licensed to harvest the shellfish for six months.

  15. Mismanagement of cockling in the Dee Estuary

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Margaret Greenwood

    MPs now move to today's final business, the adjournment debate - today led by Labour's Margaret Greenwood on cockling in the Dee Estuary.

    Although the Dee Estuary straddles the border between England and Wales it is managed solely by Natural Resources Wales – with the English Environment Agency paying a fee of round £18,000 a year to maintain upkeep.

    Commercial cockle pickers in Ms Greenwood’s constituency on the English side of the border believe the estuary "being mismanaged", and have "huge concerns the Environment Agency is not representing them adequately".

    "This is a question of democratic accountability" she tells MPs.

    The English cockle pickers would prefer to the area to be overseen by the Association of Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities (IFCA) 

  16. MPs pass higher education reforms

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Earlier on Tuesday, MPs voted to support the Higher Education Bill at second reading by 294 votes to 258.

    The bill will now pass to committee stage where it will receive detailed line-by-line scrutiny away from the main chamber.

    The programme motion (which timetables the bills progress through the house), the Ways and Means motion (which allows taxes or other charges being made on the public) and the Money resolution (which allows the spending public money) were all passed without a vote.

    Outlining the government's plans during the debate, Higher Education Minister Jo Johnson said the world has "changed massively" since the last substantial higher education changes in 1992 and current legislation was "not fit for purpose".

    We now live in "an era of mass higher education which is no longer limited to academic elites" he told MPs.

    Widening the number of institutions that can provide degrees will "drive up innovation, diversity, quality and capacity" he said.

    "We must do more to ensure young people from all backgrounds are given opportunities," he argued. "Our reforms support this ambition."

  17. MPs vote on higher education reforms

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs divide to vote on the Second reading of the bill.

    If the Commons votes against the Bill at second reading the legislation can progress no further, but if the Bill is passed at Second Reading the legislation moves on to Committee Stage.

    There's no clear winner from the oral vote so business is suspended to allow MPs to file out of the House of Commons and register their votes in person in the lobbies either side of the chamber.

    Results are expected shortly.

  18. Current legislation 'not fit for purpose'

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Higher Education Minister Jo Johnson

    Higher Education Minister Jo Johnson argues the world has "changed massively" since the last substantial Higher Education changes in 1992. Current legislation is "not fit for purpose".

    We now live in "an era of mass higher education which is no longer limited to academic elites" he tells MPs.

    This bill "brings stability" and "joins up fragmented legislation". Widening the number of institutions that can provide degrees will "drive up innovation, diversity, quality and capacity" he says.

    "We must do more to ensure young people from all backgrounds are given opportunities.

    "Our reforms support this ambition" he argues.

  19. Uncapping fees leads to 'tax on aspiration'

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner

    Shadow education secretary Angela Rayner argues this bill will lead to a "tax on aspiration".

    This bill uncaps the level of fees charged at high performing universities.

    This, Ms Rayner says, will create a "two tier system of higher education" where the "best uni's become more expensive and therefore less accessible".

    This is at a time when the number students from low income backgrounds "is already declining", she argues.

    The government are "ignoring" figures that show seven of the 24 Russel Group universities have seen "the percentage of disadvantaged students going to university fall over the last decade".

  20. Former education secretary praises bill

    Higher Education and Research Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Former education secretary Michael Gove

    Former education secretary Michael Gove attacks the Labour party for "a lack of ideas".

    Rather than the "education, education, education" policy under New Labour, there is currently "prevarication, obfuscation and mystification".

    Opposed to this is the "fizz" on the government front benches, he argues.

    "Our universities are global leaders," and this bill will lead to "the development of new higher education establishment that challenge current higher education establishments".

    Noting that both Education Secretary Justice Greening and Higher Education Minister Jo Johnson are blonde he jokes "blondness brings preferment under this government".

    "Perhaps that's where I went wrong," he adds.