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Summary

  1. MPs questioned the Communities and Local Government ministerial team; followed by a statement on the Nice attacks.
  2. The Commons voted to renew Trident by 472 votes to 117
  3. Peers started the day at 2.30pm, with questions to ministers, followed by second reading of the Policing and Crime Bill.

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

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  1. End of Commons business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And with that business in the House of Commons is brought to a close.

    MPs will be back at 11.30am tomorrow ahead of the second reading of the Higher Education and Research Bill- prepared in Sajid Javid's BIS department; he's moved on and higher education's been transferred to the Education Department under Justine Greening.

  2. Increase in support for Trident

    Point of order

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Chair of the Defence Committee Julian Lewis raises a point of order to point out that parliamentary support for Trident has increased since the last time it was voted on. 

    Dr Lewis points out that on 14 March 2007, the Commons was asked to approve the general principle of maintaining the deterrent beyond its current lifetime. The motion was passed by 409 to 161 votes - a majority of 248.

    "Where as this evening that majority has gone up to 355."

  3. MPs vote to renew Trident

    Trident vote

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have vote to renew the UK's nuclear weapons programme by 472 votes to 117.

    The vote marks the culmination of a process that started in December 2006, when Tony Blair's cabinet agreed to sustain the nuclear deterrent over the period 2020 to 2050 and beyond.

    The current generation of four submarines would begin to end their working lives some time in the late 2020s. 

    The government estimate the renewal to cost £31bn (including inflation), with a contingency of a further £10bn, spread over 35 years - though this figure is disputed. 

    Earlier in the day Theresa May told MPs it would be "an act of gross irresponsibility" for the UK to abandon its nuclear weapons.

    Tellers deliver the result of the vote
    Image caption: Tellers deliver the result of the vote
  4. MPs vote on Trident renewal

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have divided to vote on the motion to renew Trident. 

    There's no clear winner on the oral vote, so proceedings are paused to allow MPs to file out and register their votes individually in the lobbies either side of the chamber.

    Results are expected shortly

    MPs file out of the House of Commons
  5. Fallon: No other system as capable, resilient or cost effective as Trident

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon

    Defence Secretary Michael Fallon tells MPs the 2013 review of alternative to Trident found there is "no other system that is as capable, as resilient or as cost effective as the Trident based deterrent".

    "The point about deterrents is that it places doubts in the minds of our adversaries" he argues.

    Therefore Trident "is not redundant. It is being employed every day and every night" and has been for nearly 50 years.

    "We can all agree a world without nuclear weapons would be a better world" but parliament has to "face facts", Mr Fallon argues. 

    There are 17,000 nuclear weapons in the world and "the threats we face are growing" Mr Fallon says, pointing to the nuclear ambitions of North Korea and the increased nuclear threat from Russian forces.

    He also notes a commitment to renewing Trident was "clearly stated in the manifesto" on which the Conservatives won a general election.

  6. Trident vs conventional military equipment

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow defence secretary Clive Lewis

    Shadow defence secretary Clive Lewis says the Chilcot report demonstrated that military decisions made on "assumptions and poor evidence the results can be catastrophic".

    The government could have addressed some of the concerns about the cost and implementation of Trident "and unite, but have chosen to divide".

    He calls for more details on the defence budget and an "urgent assurance nuclear capability is not made at the expense of conventional military equipment". 

    Mr Lewis, who served as an Army reservist, tells MPs he knows what it is like "to be under enemy fire and need air support and being told none is available" and he is worried that the Ministry of Defence has "seen its budget suffer a real terms cut of 9%". 

    He adds he is not convinced that the government is pursuing a multi-laterailst agenda.

    Mr Lewis notes that the Labour party policy is to support the renewal of Trident but points out that there have been "developments since the last conference decision - not least Brexit".  

  7. Trident renewal a 'nail in the coffin of the Union'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SNP MP Ian Blackford says that a vote to renew Trident tonight would be a "nail in the coffin of the Union".

    "Ultimately my country will be independent and free of nuclear weapons" he tells MPs.

    Summing up for Labour, shadow defence secretary Clive Lewis says the Chilcot report demonstrated that military decisions made on "assumptions and poor evidence the results can be catastrophic".

    The government could have addressed some of the concerns about the cost and implementation of Trident "and unite, but have chosen to divide".

    He calls for more details on the defence budget and an "urgent assurance nuclear capability is not made at the expense of conventional military equipment". 

    Mr Lewis, who served as an Army reservist, tells MPs he knows what it is like "to be under enemy fire and need air support and being told none is available" and he is worried that the Ministry of Defence has "seen its budget suffer a real terms cut of 9%". 

    He adds he is not convinced that the government is pursuing a multi-laterailst agenda.

    Mr Lewis notes that the Labour party policy is to support the renewal of Trident but points out that there have been "developments since the last conference decision - not least Brexit".  

  8. Trident is about 'status not safety'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie

    SDLP MP Margaret Ritchie argues today's debate is "about status and not about safety".

    "There is no genuine security argument for the UK to spend this vast money on weapons that can never be used," she argues.

    Trident and "weapons of mass destruction" are used to "kill people in a very indiscriminate manner," she tells MPs. 

    There is no deterrent that is not already provided "by the much larger arsenals of our allies" she adds.

  9. Reed attacks Corbyn's 'reckless, juvenile, narcissistic irresponsibility'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Pro-Trident Labour MP Jamie Reed

    Pro-Trident Labour MP Jamie Reed attacks what he sees as Jeremy Corbyn's "reckless, juvenile, narcissistic irresponsibility" in opposing his own party's policy.

    "For the first time I think ever we have witnessed the leader of the Labour party stand up at the despatch box of this House and argue against the policy of the party that he leads" he tells MPs.

    The move "makes me fearful of the party that I love".

    Mr Reed, whose Copeland constituency is near Barrow-in-Furness where Trident submarines are built, argues "the sheer stupidity of this approach should be dragged out into the light and seen for what it is, because not only is renewal Labour party policy, it is the settled will of the country, and every parliamentary decision relating to it will have been taken by 2020". 

  10. End of business in the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's it from the Lords for tonight - they meet again tomorrow at 14.30 BST for questions on: 

    • the payment of universal credit monthly in arrears 
    • parliamentary scrutiny of the draft Royal Charter of the BBC
    • achieving the target of one million new homes by 2020
    • UK presidency of the European Council in the second half of 2017.
  11. Nuclear weapons 'make us less safe'

    Trident debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Earlier in the debate Green MP Caroline Lucas

    Earlier in the Trident debate Green MP Caroline Lucas argued "it cannot be proven" that nuclear weapons make us safer - as it is "impossible to prove a negative".

    Many military experts argue that nuclear weapons "make us less safe" because it increases the amount of nuclear material "floating around the world".

    By "exacerbating the uncertainty" around the future of the world, Trident is "leading to the situation it was designed to avoid", she argues.

    If the nuclear deterrent is so vital for preventing nuclear attacks, why won’t the West allow all countries in the world to have nuclear weapons, she asks.

  12. Labour attacks government 'devolution armada'

    Election of mayor orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    For Labour, Lord Beecham describes the orders to set up new super councils headed by mayors as "two further vessels in the devolution armada the government is intent on launching".

    He points out that some areas covered by the super councils voted against an elected mayor in 2012 referendums.  

    The offer being made to these areas is that they can have "devolution of any kind - as long as it's headed by a mayor", he says. 

  13. Mayoral model is 'proven and effective'

    Election of mayor orders

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers begin a debate on two orders to set up new super councils with elected mayors - in Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield Combined Authority, and the West Midlands.

    Communities Minister Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth says it is part of the government's commitment to "devolve far-reaching economic powers".

    The role of mayor is "a proven model for effective local leadership", he tells the House. 

  14. Background: Nuclear policy and non-proliferation

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Britain is a signatory to a range of agreements and treaties on nuclear weapons, the most important of which is the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation on Nuclear Weapons (NPT).

    Article 4 of NPT sets out obligations to work towards reducing the number of nuclear weapons.

    The treaty also allows the five recognised nuclear states (Britain, France, USA, China and Russia) to hold nuclear weapons but commits them to arms control and eventual disarmament.

    The government believes that replacing Trident is consistent with the treaty as it contains no restrictions on the updating and replacement of weapons system and provides no timescale for disarmament.

    Since the end of the Cold War, the UK has taken several steps to reduce its nuclear weapons. Only the Royal Navy now has the capability to fire weapons, the Army and RAF no longer do so. Britain is also has the smallest stockpile of the five nuclear nations, which will have reduced in size by 65% by the mid-2020s.

  15. Government defends Police and Crime Commissioners

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Keen

    Concluding the debate for the government, Home Office spokesman Lord Keen of Elie defends plans to give Police and Crime Commissioners oversight of fire services, saying the PCCs "have been a success". 

    Addressing mental health concerns, he says that the use of police cells as a place of safety would only occur in "exceptional circumstances". 

    Responding to calls for Leveson inquiry recommendations to be fully implemented, Lord Keen tells peers it cannot be brought forward while relevant legal cases are ongoing. 

  16. Labour criticises police watchdog plans

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Tunnicliffe

    Winding up for Labour, Lord Tunnicliffe echoes earlier criticism of the bill's proposals to allow Police and Crime Commissioners to oversee fire services, saying he would not want to see it "forced on a successful fire authority". 

    Discussing the bill's measures on complaints against the police, he argues there is still "a variety of problems" with the police. 

    He adds that redesigning the Independent Police Complaints Commission as the Police Conduct Authority "does not sound like anything holding anybody to account".

  17. Trident: How did we get here?

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In 2006, the then Labour government concluded that the international security situation did not justify the UK’s nuclear disarmament and that retaining Trident was the most effective deterrent.

    In order to maintain the UK’s nuclear capability, the government decided to replace the existing Vanguard submarines and take part in the US led missile life-extension programme.

    On 14 March 2007, the Commons approved the general principle of maintaining the deterrent beyond its current lifetime by 409 to 161 votes - you can read the report here.

    Of those, 36 MPs who are still in the House voted against that motion, including six members of the shadow cabinet.

    The programme to replace the submarines is currently in its five year assessment phase. 

    While some “long-lead” items, such as the specialised steel for the first submarine have already been purchased, the submarines will not be built until parliamentary approval has been gained.

    The current generation of four submarines would begin to end their working lives some time in the late 2020s. It is generally agreed that a decision to start building a replacement cannot be delayed any longer as the submarines alone could take up to 17 years to develop.

  18. Lib Dems raise mental health concerns

    Policing and Crime Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hamwee

    Responding to the debate for the Lib Dems, Baroness Hamwee says on protecting people with mental health problems, "the concern to do more and better comes through loud and clear".

    She calls attention to the need for places of safety, and her party's belief that tasers should not be used in mental health facilities.