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Summary

  1. The day began with Foreign Office questions.
  2. Following this, there was a ten minute rule bill from Lib Dem Tom Brake on the right of EU citizens to stay in the United Kingdom.
  3. There were two Opposition day debates: the first on the environmental implications of Brexit, the second on SATs results.
  4. Peers debated the Chilcot report into the Iraq war.

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

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  1. End of business

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    That's it from the Lords for today - they return tomorrow at 3pm for questions on: 

    • council tenants in receipt of Universal Credit who are in arrears 
    • the Welsh government's increase in recycling rates 
    • the leak of telegrams from UK Embassy in Ankara and vetting of FCO staff 
    • resurgence of violence in South Sudan.
  2. Government insists it won't 'pull up drawbridge' after Iraq

    Iraq inquiry debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Cabinet Office Minister Lord Bridges of Headley winds up the debate by saying: "Learning the lessons of Iraq does not mean pulling up the drawbridge." 

    Sir John Chilcot last week outlined his findings on the UK's involvement in the 2003 Iraq War and the lessons to be learned from it.

    The report spans almost a decade of UK government policy decisions between 2001 and 2009.

    It covers the background to the decision to go to war, whether troops were properly prepared, how the conflict was conducted and what planning there was for its aftermath, a period in which there was intense sectarian violence.

  3. Labour: Leaders must take decision to go to war

    Iraq inquiry debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Collins

    Labour spokesman Lord Collins of Highbury says the Chilcot report is unlikely to have changed many people's minds. 

    He claims the report portrays the Iraq War as "a big mistake", but does not make the case for non-interventionism or find that anyone acted in "bad faith".

    He says the report "accepts that ultimately leaders have to make decisions and especially the tough ones". 

  4. Lib Dems: Government was warned over Iraq

    Iraq inquiry debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate for the Lib Dems, Baroness Northover tells peers the Chilcot report "hasn't pulled its punches" even though "much of it comes as no surprise". 

    "Nobody could say the government wasn't warned," she says, citing letters from her colleagues and from legal and military analysts. 

  5. Senior diplomat: Government did not listen to Lords on Iraq

    Iraq inquiry debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Wright

    Crossbencher and former head of HM Diplomatic Service Lord Wright of Richmond recalls he "warned" against military action at the time. 

    "There is no sign any of the powerful interventions in this House.. were ever brought to the attention of the prime minister," he says, adding that he was given "repeated assurance that regime change was no part of the government's policy". 

    He advises that if the UK is to support the US in its foreign policy Parliament must "examine very closely" its motives. 

  6. How Tony Blair came to be so unpopular

    Jim Naughtie

    Radio 4 presenter

    Tony Blair

    No British prime minister in modern times has experienced a plunge in fortune like Tony Blair's.

    Cheered to the echo as he left the Commons chamber for the last time as prime minister in 2007, after 10 years of largely untroubled dominance, the tragedy of Iraq quickly ensnared him so completely that by this summer he admitted he would be a liability in the campaign to keep Britain in the European Union. The old Blair magic had turned to sand.

    But it had once seemed like magic. A parliamentary majority in 1997 of proportions that no-one in politics could remember, and along with it a feeling that like Margaret Thatcher, whom he'd watched in amazement as a young MP in the 1980s, he had set a national mood that made a permanent break with the past.

    Then, after Bill Clinton had welcomed him on to the world stage, came George W Bush.

    The Chilcot report lays out the consequences of that relationship - the "whatever" memo of support to the president in 2002 will surely stand as its emblem - and catalogues Blair's journey to the assault on Baghdad and his inability to control, perhaps even to influence, the chaos that followed.

    Read more.

  7. Peer attacks legal basis for Iraq War

    Iraq inquiry debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Thomas

    Lib Dem Lord Thomas of Gresford argues the Chilcot report demonstrates the government and advisers played "pass the parcel" with legal advice. 

    He concludes it led to an "illegal war of aggression", and the practice by which Tony Blair could be brought before Parliament to account for his actions is "not obsolete". 

  8. End of Commons business

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Business in the House of Commons draws to a finish. 

    MPs will be back at 11.30am tomorrow ahead of David Cameron's last prime minister's questions.

  9. Government working on 'long-term solution' for supported housing

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Housing Minister Marcus Jones

    Housing Minister Marcus Jones argues properly funding supported housing feeds into one of the government's "key commitments to protect the most vulnerable in society".

    Funding for supported housing must be "efficient, workable, transparent and sustainable" in order to support a "high quality service for those who need it".

    "Long-term reform of the sector is overdue," he acknowledges, going on to say the Local Housing Allowance cap is "a short-term fix" and the government is "working on a long-term solution".

    "Universal credit provides an opportunity to drive that reform as housing benefit is phased out" he argues.

  10. Motion on Trident renewal debate dropped

    Business of the House

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Before the adjournment debate began a motion that was subject to some criticism earlier today was unexpectedly dropped.

    The motion, to set aside time for a debate next Monday on renewing the UK's Trident nuclear defence programme (a controversial subject for the Labour party), had been tabled before the debate itself had been formally announced - leading to some MPs to questions the government's motives.

    Though the motion was dropped the debate is still likely to go ahead - according to Leader of the House Chris Grayling's office - and will be announced in this Thursday's business statement.

  11. The future of supported housing

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    An elderly man in a wheelchair

    We now come to today's final business, the adjournment debate, which is led by Conservative MP Peter Aldous on future funding of supported housing.

    Supported housing is social housing provided to those people who cannot live by themselves without an element of care. Often these people have mental health problems, have suffered from addiction, are ex-servicemen and women, or are young adults with severe learning difficulties.  

    Due to the Local Housing Allowance cap, housing benefit paid to those in supported housing will be capped at the LHA rate for each local authority - set based on a measurement of the bottom 30% of the rental market. 

    Critics say this will not be enough and many supported housing schemes will be forced to close. 

  12. New hereditary peer announced: Lord Boyle

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Earlier, a new crossbench hereditary peer was announced following the recent by-election. 

    Earl of Cork and Orrery (Lord Boyle) said in his statement he was interested in "the continued attrition of the armed forces, the inherent dangers of the Scottish independence debate, and abuse of charity legislation".

  13. MPs approve increase in tribunal fees

    Orders and regulations

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs approve the increase in tribunal fees by 278 votes to 218.

  14. MPs vote on increasing cost of access to tribunals

    Orders and Regulations

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have divided to vote on approve new measures to increase a number of fees charged in the civil and magistrates courts by 10%.

    Under the draft Civil Proceedings, First-tier Tribunal, Upper Tribunal and Employment Tribunals Fees (Amendment) Order 2016 fees in judicial review proceedings heard in the immigration and asylum chamber will be increased, but "the uplift will not apply to fees in civil proceedings that are already set above cost".

  15. MPs reject Labour motion on SATs

    Opposition Day debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs vote to reject Labour's call to ditch using this year's SATs to measure school performance by 278 votes to 178.

  16. Decision to vote after 'considerable discussion'

    Iraq inquiry debate

    Baroness Armstrong

    Former Labour chief whip Baroness Armstrong of Hilltop tells peers she reached the decision to vote for military action after "considerable discussion with colleagues - it wasn't just sprung upon us". 

    She says that "we are all very good at hindsight, we do not know what the outcome would have been" had the UK not invaded Iraq. 

    The report shows the need to "strengthen and reform the UN" so that it is equipped to act in the future, Lady Armstrong says. 

  17. MPs vote on using 2016 SATs results to measure school performance

    Opposition Day debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs file out of the chamber to register their votes
    Image caption: MPs file out of the chamber to register their votes

    MPs have divided to vote on the Labour motion on calling on the government to not use the low 2016 SATs results for measuring school performance.

    Results are expected shortly.

  18. Gibb: Reforms are working

    Opposition Day debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Education Minister Nick Gibb

    Education Minister Nick Gibb says it would have been easier not to "have changed the system" and "taken on vested interest" but that would have "allowed the continued inflation of results...masking the decline in standards".

    Over 120,000 six year-olds are "reading more effectively today because of these government reforms".

    "We know we are asking more, but we're doing that because we are committed to giving you people the best start in life."

  19. Chilcot report: MI6, a Hollywood movie and faulty intelligence

    Gordon Corera

    Security correspondent, BBC News

    The Iraq Inquiry by Sir John Chilcot presents a devastating picture of intelligence that is damning for both spies and the politicians.

    It is critical of MI6's collection and presentation of its sources; of the analysis by the wider intelligence community; of the way the Joint Intelligence Committee allowed its material to be used and of the way in which politicians talked about intelligence to the public.

    The story of one particular MI6 agent, as told in the inquiry report, reveals much of what went wrong.

    Read more.