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Summary

  1. Peers began their day at 11.30am, with a long debate on the EU referendum which will continue tomorrow.
  2. At 2.30pm, peers halted the debate to question government ministers.
  3. The Commons started with Health questions, followed by an urgent question on today's teachers' strike.
  4. The Wales Bill completed its first day of committee stage scrutiny.

Live Reporting

By Esther Webber and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

Get involved

Good evening - and thanks for joining us

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

That's where we leave the House of Lords for this evening. Speeches are continuing and you can carry on watching on BBC Parliament. You can find out who will be speaking later tonight here.

For the time being, thanks for watching and join us tomorrow for more debate on the EU referendum from their lordships.

Brexit presents 'huge trading opportunities'

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Conservative Lord Flight argues leaving the EU presents "huge trading opportunities with India and China" and the chancellor's announcement that he will cut corporation tax is "very attractive".

He says the government needs to focus on conveying the message that it "cares deeply" about attracting investment and new business. 

Brexit vote 'sudden and breathtaking' - Lord Hennessy

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Hennessy
BBC

Crossbencher and historian Lord Hennessy of Nympsfield says Brexit an event of "magnitude previously unseen in peacetime - sudden and breathtaking".  

He argues that the UK "prides itself on its back-of-the-envelope approach - but this was excessive".

He goes on to say: "Never have I experienced so many people with so few ideas of what to do in a crisis, ever." 

End of Commons business

House of Commons

Parliament

And with that business in the House of Commons comes to a close.

MPs will be back tomorrow at 11.30am ahead of the weekly duel between David Cameron and Jeremy Corbyn at Prime Minister’s questions.

Role of counter-extremism

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding to comments about community counter extremism practices potentially further alienating minority groups, Home Office Minister Karen Bradley says legislation only applies "promotion of opinions that can lead to violence".

Those publicly promoting practices such as female genital mutilation would be prosecuted and not those adhering to non-violent practices, she promises.

Hate crime has 'no place in our society'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Responding to the debate, Home Office Minister Karen Bradley says the government is "ultimately committed to tackling hate crime" and is increasing funding to security and community services.

"Hate crime of any kind has absolutely no place in our society", she adds.

There has been "no police intelligence that there will be any significant public order risks following referendum", she says. 

Home Office Minister Karen Bradley
BBC

Ex-Army chief criticises handling of EU nationals question

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Craig
BBC

Crossbencher Lord Craig of Radley, a former chief of the defence staff, says that in ministers' replies to questions on EU nationals' legal status, "real life immediate concerns were shuffled under the carpet". 

He urges: "Let us say without equivocation they would not be asked to leave and this should be a red line in negotiations."

The issue "should not be left to fester on the pile", he adds. 

'Not in our name'

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Labour MP Yasmin Qureshi says she grew up the child of Pakistaini parents and "frequently received abuse" which "haunted her generation" and "stung because it implied I didn't truly belong in this country". 

Ms Quereshi said she was "horrified to see the language return" during the EU referendum campaign and called the UKIP 'breaking point' poster the "visual equivalent of the Rivers of Blood speech".

The UK must get together and we say "not in our name, this is not what we are as a country".

Labour MP Yasmin Qureshi
BBC

Is the rise in Hate Crime a long term trend?

Dominic Casciani

Home Affairs Correspondent

The full picture regarding hate crime after a Brexit vote could take months to emerge. And the national trend in recent years has been quite complicated.

Police-recorded hate crimes have been rising - but that could be more victims coming forward because they have confidence police will take them seriously.

The Crime Survey for England and Wales, an internationally-recognised rolling study of the bigger picture, suggests racism is slowly being pushed to the margins.

But there's no doubt that genuine moments of extreme national or global tension - such as major terrorist incidents or the conflict in the Middle East - are followed by spikes.

Extremists appear to take the opportunity to act because they think they can get away with it.

So the question is this: are the latest statistics a blip or a sign of a more worrying long-term trend?

Rise in hate crime

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

Since the vote to leave the European Union, there have been reports of racism on social media, and a number of groups have reported a rise in incidents of racism and hate crime.

True Vision, a police-funded online reporting facility for hate crime, said it had received 85 reports between Thursday 23 and Sunday 26 June compared with 54 reports during the same period last month.

In London, the Metropolitan Police are investigating graffiti at a Polish community building in Hammersmith which they are treating as a hate crime "because of the racially-aggravated nature of the criminal damage".

Hate crimes reported to Leicestershire Police have almost doubled since the EU referendum, according to the force's chief constable.  

Last month David Cameron condemned reported in the wake of the UK's referendum vote to leave the EU.

Former Thatcher adviser optimistic about negotiations

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Griffiths
BBC

Former adviser to Margaret Thatcher and Conservative peer Lord Griffiths of Fforestfach says there's "every reason to think we can negotiate a reasonable outcome and new trade deals".

On immigration, he adds it's "essential we're able to control our total numbers - what scares people not immigration per se but having no limits". 

Wales 'will be at sharp end' of Brexit

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Baroness Randerson
BBC

Lib Dem Baroness Randerson discusses the vote by the majority of Welsh people to leave the EU "despite being a net beneficiary of EU funding". 

She predicts that many areas of Wales will be "at the sharp end if industrial and business investment is withdrawn". 

She further claims "successive administrations have been unwilling to endorse" EU funding for Wales and the government needs to "beware of creating another Scotland".

Race hate crime debate begins

Adjournment debate

House of Commons

Parliament

The House of Commons is now onto the adjournment debate, led by Labour MP Yasmin Qureshi.

It is on a topical subject - the EU referendum and race hate crime.

MPs vote on need for referendum on tax powers

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs divide to vote on plans to remove the requirement to hold a referendum before devolving some of the income tax levied in Wales to the Welsh government.

Read more here.

Labour proposal rejected

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have rejected Labour's proposal to introduce a new system for devolving tax varying powers to Wales by votes to 285 votes to 181.

MPs vote on Labour tax varying plans

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs divide on a Labour proposal to do away with needing a referendum to approve tax varying powers and replace it with a "fiscal framework" that must be approved by the Welsh Assembly and each House of Parliament.

Under this bill control of some of the income tax levied in Wales can be devolved to the Welsh government without a referendum.  

Shadow Welsh secretary Paul Flynn had said the "propaganda on referendums" recently have "degraded and distorted" the results, making them inappropriate to decide tax rate changes.

Any new "fiscal framework" would consider "each of the factors that will affect the level of spend on devolved public services in Wales" and include a "long term commitment to a funding floor" for Wales.

Results are expected shortly.

Justice impact assessments approved

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have supported the government's plans to require those bringing forward new bills to make a written statement setting out its potential impact on the justice system in England and Wales, by 294 votes to 228.

Former MEP: I don't recognise EU as portrayed in Brexit debate

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Cashman
BBC

Labour's Lord Cashman, a former MEP, begins his speech with a quote from King Lear: 

The weight of this sad time we must obey; speak what we feel, not what we ought to say."

He says he sees the "sadness on the front bench at a result the government did not want". 

He tells the House he didn't "recognise the EU institutions as described here" during the campaign and after the result he felt "I didn't belong in my own country - but it's made me more determined than ever to uphold British and European values".

MPs divide on impact assessments

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs file out of the House of Commons to register their votes in the lobbies either side of the chamber
BBC
MPs file out of the House of Commons to register their votes in the lobbies either side of the chamber

MPs have divided to vote on plans to require those bringing forward new bills to make a written statement setting out its potential impact on the justice system in England and Wales.

Critics have suggested that these new Justice Impact Assessments may – when used in concert with existing powers available to the secretary of state – be used to veto future made-in-Wales legislation.

Results are expected shortly.

New shadow Wales team

New shadow Wales minister Carolyn Harris tweets

'Overdose' of referendums

Press Association journalist tweets

MPs debate devolution details as Tories choose leader

David Cornock

BBC Wales Parliamentary correspondent

BBC Wales Parliamentary correspondent, David Cornock, has given a round up of today's Wales Bill debate in his blog here.

Amongst the highlights David has singled out the debate on creating a separate Welsh legal jurisdiction and Paul Flynn's quip that front bench posts are like "London buses: you wait 26 years for one and then two come along together" - Mr Flynn is covering his brief alongside shadow leader of the House.

Financial accountability

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Welsh Conservative MP Glyn Davies
BBC

Earlier in the debate Welsh Conservative MP Glyn Davies criticised arguments for holding a referendum on tax variability powers as a "blocking mechanism".

The 2014 Wales Act introduced a new power to allow a new Welsh Rate of income tax if approved by a referendum.

But under this bill control of some of the income tax levied in Wales can be devolved to the Welsh government without a referendum.

Mr Davies says for the Welsh Assembly to be a "proper democracy" it needs to have "financial accountability".

At the moment Welsh Budgets are merely "spending plans", deciding how to apportion central government funds "without having to make any unpopular decisions about" tax increases or reductions in public spending.

Opposition to tax varying powers are trying "to make certain the Welsh government never becomes financially accountable". 

But some Assembly Members, including several Welsh Conservatives, have called for a referendum before tax varying powers can be implemented he supports tax variability powers to Wales.

Peer raises hate crime worries

Lord Bilimoria raises concerns about hate crime in the House of Lords.
Lord Bilimoria raises concerns about hate crime, during questions in the House of Lords.

Lord Kerr: Nonsense to defer negotiations until Article 50 invoked

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Kerr
BBC

Former senior diplomat and crossbencher Lord Kerr of Kinlochard tells peers invoking Article 50 is "nothing to do with anybody in Brussels" and that personally he is "inclined to think there should be a vote in Parliament".

He says leaving the EU is a "serious mistake" and the UK's "influence will be diminished", but "we are where we are" and it would be foolish to try to avoid it.  

He adds that advice from some EU quarters that we cannot begin negotiations until Article 50 is activated is "errant nonsense".

The Silk Commission

House of Commons

Parliament

The Wales Bill arose from the second report of the Silk Commission.

The report looked into the scope of the Welsh Assembly's powers and made a series of recommendations on extending the control over Welsh affairs.

Among its recommendations the report called for control over youth justice and powers over policing to be devolved to Wales.

The process of extended negotiation with the four main political parties in Wales to agree what would end up in the Wales Bill, known as the ‘St David’s Day process’, concluded on 27 February 2015.     

The St David’s Day Agreement differed from the Silk recommendations in requiring a two-thirds majority within the Assembly for certain decisions  - including changing the name of the Assembly or the electoral system of the Welsh Assembly.

The previous Wales Act 2014 implemented the recommendations made in the first report of the Silk Commission on financial matters, including devolving stamp duty and landfill tax.

Lord Lawson: Brexit a chance to finish what Thatcher started
The vote to leave the EU means the next prime minister can “finish the job which Margaret Thatcher started”, former Tory Chancellor Lord Lawson says.

MPs consider electoral powers for the Welsh Assembly

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

Woman casting ballot into ballot box whilst voting in election
BBC

MPs now move to proposals to devolve new powers over elections to the Welsh Assembly.

Under the bill, the Welsh Assembly will have power over how elections take place in the institution's name.

This includes deciding the electoral system, the number of constituencies, their boundaries, the timing of elections - even if they coincide with general elections - and the conduct of the elections themselves  

Assembly Members would have the power to lower the voting age to 16 for Assembly elections -  the Assembly already has the power to lower the voting age to 16 for a referendum on devolving income tax powers.  

Welsh ministers will not be able to make any regulations regarding electoral registration. 

Peers resume Brexit debate

EU referendum debate

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers have resumed their debate on Brexit, with Conservative leave campaigner Lord Dobbs reiterating his calls for EU nationals not to be used as "bargaining chips".

He describes Jean-Claude Juncker's comments as "clumsy" and says he believes were it not for Mr Juncker, remain could have won. 

Teachers' strike condemned by government

Teachers' strike statement

House of Lords

Parliament

Lord Nash
BBC

Education Minister Lord Nash is repeating the answer to an urgent question, calling today's strike "pointless", "politically motivated" and "damaging" to teacher's public image.

The strike is about school funding and teacher pay and but this year's school budget "is greater than in any previous year" at £40bn.

The strike does not have a "democratic mandate from a majority of NUT members", he adds.

Explanatory statement

Parliamentary service tweets

Labour amendment rejected

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have just voted to reject Labour amendment 7, which would recognise Welsh law as independent to English law, with ayes at 217 and noes 274 - a majority of 57.

Hate speech

Oral questions

House of Lords

Parliament

Crossbencher Lord Rana is asking what steps are being taken to tackle xenophobia and racist extremism in the light of the reported increase in the incidence of hate speech against immigrants following the EU referendum.

Last week David Cameron condemned "despicable" incidents of hate crime reported in the wake of the UK's referendum vote to leave the EU.

There had been cases of "verbal abuse hurled" at ethnic minorities, and "despicable graffiti daubed on a Polish community centre", he told the Commons.

Police are probing some incidents.

Plaid's amendment rejected

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

The amendment fails - votes are ayes to the right 41 - and the noes 270, a majority of 229.

MPs are now dividing to vote on Labour's amendment 7.

An unlikely Lords guest?

Esther Webber

BBC News, London

Harry Styles
BBC

We're told One Direction singer Harry Styles is in the Lords today.

He's a guest of Labour's Lord Winston, whose son has directed several of the band's videos, and was also introduced to shadow Lords leader Baroness Smith of Basildon. 

No word yet on whether he intends to stick around for eight more hours of the Lords debate on Brexit... 

View more on twitter

MPs vote creating a separate Legal jurisdiction for Wales

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

MPs have divided on a Plaid Cymru amendment to create a separate legal jurisdiction for Wales.

Currently, laws made in Wales, for Wales, still form part of the law of England and Wales. This is because England and Wales share a single legal jurisdiction. 

This is not the case in Scotland and Northern Ireland, who have separate legal jurisdictions.

Results are expected shortly. 

Airport capacity

Oral questions

House of Lords

Parliament

Plane
Getty Images

Peers now begin oral questions, with the first coming from Conservative Lord Spicer on plans for the future development of runways at Gatwick and Stansted airports, in addition to Heathrow airport.

Gatwick may be back in the race against Heathrow to build a new runway following the vote to leave the EU and David Cameron's resignation.  

Read more from BBC Transport Correspondent Richard Westcott. 

Watch again: Archbishop addresses peers

EU referendum debate

Lord Welby says the campaign led to an "outwelling of hatred and poison".

Peers take a break

House of Lords

Parliament

Peers take a short break until 2.30pm, when they'll return for oral questions.

Flynn: Wales bills no longer 'grudging'

Wales Bill

House of Commons

Parliament

New shadow welsh secretary Paul Flynn
BBC

New shadow Welsh secretary Paul Flynn notes the "tortuous birth pains for devolution" which have gone "on and on".

Wales Bill of the past "were grudging bills" which gave "a little bit of power and then took it back, then allow a little bit more".

"Happily I think those days are gone," he says and calls the current Wales Bill "a good bit of legislation that will give the assembly in Wales more stability and durability".