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Summary

  1. The day began with the Business Statement from the Leader of the House.
  2. There was an urgent question on the recent decision by the High Court to establish the right of parents to take their children on holiday during term-time.
  3. Then there was a statement from Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt on the agreement with junior doctors.
  4. MPs and peers debated the proposals in the Queen's Speech and the proposed legislation.
  5. The debate continues over several days, looking at different subject areas. The Queen's Speech is voted on by the Commons, but no vote is taken in the Lords.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

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  1. Peers adjourn

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe concludes telling peers that the government has produced "a one nation agenda that puts the vulnerable first".

    She thanks lords for their contribution to the debate and says their expertise will be valuable when it comes to scrutinising the bills.

    And with that the day in the House of Lords comes to an end.

    Join us on Monday for continued debate, in both chambers, on the Queen's Speech.

    Peers adjourn
  2. Baroness Neville-Rolfe sums up

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokeswoman Baroness Neville-Rolfe covers a range of points in her summing up speech.

    She tells peers that government proposals will give the BBC "enhanced editorial and financial independence".

    She says the Higher Education and Research Bill will make it "quicker and easier" for high quality education providers to enter the market and award their own degrees.

    She defends the government's aim of seeing all schools become academies arguing that "excellence comes with more teacher freedom". 

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe
  3. Government's 'z-turn' on academies

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's education spokesman Lord Watson of Invergowrie worries that the government's U-turn on academies is not what it seems - "it's more of a z-turn".

    He expresses concern that although schools will no longer be officially required to become academies they could be coerced through "underhand tactics".

    Lord Watson of Invergowrie
  4. King warns of child benefits 'contradiction'

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness King says that, as a mother of three adopted children, she "warmly welcomes" government efforts to increase adoption where it is in the best interests of the child. 

    However she asks the government to fix what she believes to be a contradiction in its welfare policy.

    She notes that child benefit under universal credit will be limited to two children with some exemptions, including adopted children.

    The baroness worries that this exemption only applies to adopted children that are genetically related.

    This, she tells peers, makes no sense. 

    Baroness King
  5. Commons business comes to an end

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Tobias Ellwood concludes by saying that the reopening of the British embassy in Iran last year and the nuclear deal are "positive steps" with our relationship with Iran, and says the government will do whatever it can do to help in the case of Mr Foroughi.

    With that the House of Commons adjourns for the day, and indeed the week.

    MPs will return at 2.30pm on Monday. 

  6. Conservative peer welcomes business rate plans

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Baroness Wheatcroft welcomes plans to give local authorities the power to set business rates.

    She argues that this will encourage "creative thinking" about how to attract businesses.

    She hopes that differential rates will "generate new life" on the high street which have been "blighted by shop closures". 

    Baroness Wheatcroft
  7. Minister: Government has been lobbying Iran over Foroughi case

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tobias Ellwood

    Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood sets out the government's position on dual nationality citizens, saying that "ownership of a second passport obligates the owner to that second state".

    He says that from a Foreign and Commonwealth Office consular policy basis "we do not normally provide the same level of assistance to dual nationals in the country of their other nationality".

    Minister Ellwood says on this specific case, the government has been involved in a huge amount of effort in lobbying the Iranian government directly and indirectly over the release of Mr Foroughi.

    He also says that consular staff have been working to support the family.

  8. Family fear continued imprisonment

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Dowden tells MPs that the family of Kamal Foroughi did not go public about his situation initially as they did not want to make his situation worse, but have decided to raise the issue now because of his deteriorating health.

    The MP for Hertsmere says that it is compliant with Iranian law to release Mr Foroughi, but says the family fears that the Iranian government will try to bring other criminal charges against him upon the completion of his sentence.

    He says that it would be an "indication of the seriousness of the commitment of the Iranian government in improving Anglo-Iranian relations" if they secured the release of Mr Foroughi and other people in this situation. 

    Oliver Dowden
  9. Social care system 'at breaking point'

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Baroness Brinton accuses the government's approach to social care as being not only invisible but "an invisible elephant".

    She says the system is at "breaking point" due to a "perfect storm" of the increasing pressures of an ageing population and cuts to local government. 

    Baroness Brinton
  10. Background on Kamal Foroughi case

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Mr Foroughi has been imprisoned in Iran on a conviction for spying for the last four years, having been arrested in May 2011 and sentenced in 2013 to eight years' imprisonment at Evin Prison.

    Mr Foroughi received seven years for spying and one year for possessing alcohol at home.

    The Foreign Office has been aware of the case since 2013, but is unable to provide consular support, as Iran does not recognise Mr Foroughi's dual nationality. 

  11. Modern-day palliative care 'a disgrace'

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Naseby sticks to the subject of health provision, choosing to make three points.

    He urges the government to drop changes to the Cancer Drug Fund - arguing that "it is working well as it is". 

    He calls palliative care "a disgrace today" and tells peers that trainee GPs are not taught any element of providing such care.

    Finally, he says he is concerned that 70% of female GPs want to work part-time and calls for "an urgent review" to rebalance the GP intake to a 50:50 gender balance from the present 60:40 split between female and male trainees. 

    Lord Naseby
  12. MPs begin debate on Kamal Foroughi case

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate comes to an end, and after some housekeeping and the presentation of a petition on the closure of Lloyds Bank in Bredbury, we move on to the adjournment debate - which is being led today by Conservaitve MP Oliver Dowden.

    The debate is on the detention of dual Iran and UK citizen Kamal Foroughi in Iran. 

  13. Local government to 'design own destiny'

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister Lewis outlines several of the legislative proposals on local infrastructure within the speech, saying the plans "take place in the broader context of localism" with the devolution of "billions of pounds of infrastructure funds".

    The government, he says, is allowing local government to "design their own destiny" 

    Mr Lewis says it is for these reasons that this is "such an important gracious speech that delivers for the country". 

    Brandon Lewis
  14. Minister says Labour 'doing down our country'

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Housing Minister Brandon Lewis rises to respond to the debate for the government and responds to John Healey's attacks on the government's record, telling him:"he can keep his record of boom and bust and we'll keep ours of rescue and reform".

    He tells the Labour frontbench to "stop doing down our country". 

  15. Frontbench filled

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Frontbench
    Image caption: The Conservative backbenches may be relatively empty, but ministers are out in force for the end of this debate.
  16. NHS 'heading for a crash'

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Birmingham

    Lib Dem Lord Taverne begins on a pessimistic note, telling peers that the national health service is heading for a crash sooner than anyone fears.

    He accuses the government of being intent on reducing the NHS's income at a time when pressures on the service are rising.

    He proposes a new reformed national insurance system whereby contributions are earmarked for health and social care. 

  17. Healey attacks government record on infrastructure

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Healey attacks the record of the government since 2010 in response to Patrick McLoughlin's earlier remarks about the Labour government's legacy.

    The shadow minister says that in the last year of the Labour government spending on infrastructure was 3.4% of GDP, whilst it has fallen to 1.9% this year.

    "That is the reality of the difference between the great rhetoric and the actions we see from this government", he adds. 

  18. Changes to prisons 'long overdue'

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Suri

    Conservative Lord Suri welcomes the government's measures on prisons.

    He argues that the "reform is long overdue", in part because governments want to be seen as tough on crime.

    He tells peers that he eagerly anticipates the results from of giving six prisons more autonomy. 

  19. Shadow minister criticises 'managerial' Queen's Speech

    Queen's Speech debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Healey

    Shadow Communities and Local Government Minister John Healey begins his response to the day's debate by remarking: "what an extraordinary waste of time".

    He says that he counted 42 announcements in the speech, of which only four "had not been announced already".

    "This is the so-what Queen's Speech" he tells MPs, calling it "minimal, managerial and marking time". 

  20. Broadband speed pledge 'a huge disappointment'

    Humble Address

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lib Dem Lord Clement Jones is not convinced by the government's pledge to introduce a universal service obligation (USO) guaranteeing a minimum broadband speed of 10 megabits per second.

    He argues that this level is far too low, pointing out that the average speed in the UK is 39 megabits.

    The USO, he says, will be a "huge disappointment" for those in rural areas. 

    Broadband box