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Summary

  1. MPs on the Work and Pensions Committee took evidence from Work and Pensions Secretary Stephen Crabb.
  2. MPs assembled in the chamber at 11.30am, with Prime Minister's questions at noon.
  3. There was an urgent question on the BBC White Paper, from shadow culture secretary Maria Eagle.
  4. MPs then considered Lords' amendments followed by a debate on uprating of pensions for UK pensioners living overseas.
  5. Peers met at 3pm and, after oral questions, had three debates scheduled.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Gary Connor

All times stated are UK

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  1. House adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The minister brings his remarks to a close and the day's business in the House of Lords comes to an end.

    Thanks for joining us - MPs return tomorrow at 9.30am and peers begin again at 11am.

    Until then though - good night. 

  2. Buses bill 'just over the horizon'

    Bus services debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Transport Minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon responds to the debate by mentioning the various funding routes for local bus services - naming several government departments as well as the NHS.

    The minister says that government is spending £7.6 million on a review looking at how various organs of government can work together to provide efficient and cost-effective bus services.

    A number of peers mentioned a rumoured upcoming 'buses bill' during the debate, and Lord Ahmad says that peers should "wait a little longer - it is just over the horizon".

    Lord Ahmad adds: "where greener buses have been operating we have seen the benefits - but the technology is still developing". 

    He says that the government is committed to encouraging greener buses and outlines a number of funding schemes to promote this. 

  3. Labour call for more local powers

    Bus services debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Rosser

    Labour Transport spokesperson Lord Rosser says the government's "persistent attack on local government budgets over the past six years" has led to a reduction in the ability of local authorities to maintain bus services that commercial bus companies will not run because they are not profitable.

    On the environmental issue, Lord Rosser argues that local transport authorities should have powers to set environmental standards on buses in their area.

  4. Buses today 'unrecognisable' to 15 years ago

    Bus services debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Snape talks about the progress made in the bus industry, saying modern buses are "unrecognisable" when compared to buses of "even 15 years ago" - talking about the connectivity and accessibility of new vehicles.

    He argues that the main competitor to bus companies is not other companies but the car - "buses can only be viable if they offer a truly viable alternative to the private car" he says.

    Lord Snape tells peers that the bus "really is the glue that holds together a successful and sustainable community".

    Lib Dem Lord Greaves says the reduction in funding in local authorities means that the "screws are being put on the subsidised bus services". 

    Lord Snape
  5. Buses debate begins

    Bus services debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Randerson

    The debate on school admissions comes to an end and the next debate begins.

    Liberal Democrat peer Baroness Randerson is leading the last debate of the day, which is on bus services in England and their environmental impact.

    Baroness Randerson says that despite falling usage outside of London, "every day 2.5 million people go to work by bus" and argues that bus services are often most important to the most vulnerable in society.

    She argues that cuts to bus services are similar in scale to the Beeching cuts to train services in the 1960s.

    On the environmental side of the issue, Baroness Randerson argues that "cutting edge technology" offers opportunities to cut carbon emissions and also says that the "uber model" of business could be an answer to falling bus usage - saying "there is nothing sacred about the bus as a style of vehicle". 

  6. Minister: review of code underway

    School admissions code debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesperson Baroness Evans of Bowes Park responds to the debate saying that there is an ongoing consultation on the admissions code, telling peers that many of the issues they have raised are being addressed in this review.

    The aim of the review, she says, is to "make the admissions process as clear and fair as possible".

  7. 'Enormous pressure' on schools

    School admissions code debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer and education spokesperson Lord Storey begins his response to the debate by saying "admission codes must be fair and equitable and in the interest of local schooling".

    He argues that schools dealing with exams, league table positions, and Ofsted inspections place "enormous pressure on schools" and could lead to "wholly unacceptable situations where schools might be tempted to engineer the intake". 

    Lord Storey
  8. 'Rationing' of school places

    School admissions code debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Desai

    Labour's Baroness Massey of Darwen welcomes the "timely" debate and notes that some have claimed that admissions are in "a mess". 

    Lib Dem Lord Taverne says that the system by which religious schools are allowed to set their own admissions criteria is "not fit for purpose" and says that schools need to be made inclusive and free from discrimination.

    "Schools should not put children into categories of belief", he adds. 

    Labour's Lord Desai says that the lack of school places amounts to rationing, and says "when there is rationing it gives "powers to the suppliers" to impose conditions. 

  9. School admissions code debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers now move on to a debate on the school admissions code, led by Labour's shadow education spokesperson, Lord Watson of Invergowrie.

    The current admissions code came into force in December 2014, but varies from school to school. Schools may give priority to some children due to their faith, or already having a sibling at the same school.

    The Office of the Schools Adjudicator helps to clarify the legal position on admissions policies in schools, and also settles disputes about school organisation proposals.

    Lord Watson
  10. House of Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Claire Perry says she could talk on the issue all night...however, it is an empty threat and the debate concludes, bringing the day in the Commons to an end. 

    MPs will return tomorrow for the last day of the Parliamentary session also known as prorogation.

    There will be a special programme on BBC Parliament to mark the occasion. 

    Natascha Engel
    Image caption: Deputy Speaker Natascha Engel announces the Commons adjournment
  11. 'Educational attainment is key'

    Life chances strategy debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Work and Pensions Minister Baroness Altmann thanks peers for their contribution to the debate, and says that a focus on life chances is ensuring that every individual is able to realise their potential.

    "We know that being part of a working household is the best route out of poverty," she tells peers.

    She says she "hears the concerns" on Universal Credit and says that it is "clear that educational attainment is key to ensuring poor children do not end up as poor adults."

    Baroness Altmann
  12. 'Making work pay'

    Life chances strategy debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Summarising the debate on behalf of the opposition, Labour's shadow pensions minister Baroness Sherlock says that she's going to sit in the Bishops' Bar to talk about the subject further, because she doesn't have time to cover all her points in five minutes.

    Focusing on the issue of work, she says that there is concern from all signs about working poverty and Universal Credit, the latter which she says all peers need to protect from the "ravishes" of the Treasury.

    "One of the things we have to do is address making work pay."

    Baroness Sherlock
  13. Call to 'think big'

    Life chances strategy debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative Lord Shinkwin says he endorses the prime minister's call to "think big".

    "The strategy needs to be inclusive because as we all know, disability remains a major source of disadvantage," he continues.

    He asks those who are drafting the life chances strategy to include a package of cost-effective measures to ensure disabled graduates reach their full potential.

    Lord Shinkwin
  14. Perry: Timetable changes led to unintended consequences

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Transport Minister Claire Perry tells the MP that C2C introduced the changes to help passengers who wanted to get on at West Ham and Barking.

    However she acknowledges that there have been unintended consequences. In this case "clever London commuters" realised they could use the C2C line rather than the District line (the Tube). This, she says, has led to overcrowding. 

    She notes that the company has responded by making adjustments to the timetable and will continue to do so. 

    Claire Perry
  15. A new approach needed

    Life Chances Strategy Debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer Lord Lupton argues that it is "unproductive to overlay the intractable social problem of poverty, its causes, and its solutions with excessive party politicking". 

    He argues that both the ideas of "big state" policies of government intervention and wealth redistribution, and laissez-faire capitalism as the sole answers to poverty are "defunct".

    He argues that a new "social approach" is needed.

  16. 'Lessons to be learnt'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Amess concludes: "Let me used the dreadful expression - lesson to be learnt."

    He suggests that the lesson C2C should learn is that "they should not make an enemy of my good self - I remember everything and do hold grudges".

    However he says he will keep fighting and is positive that the service will be improved.

  17. More than one chance

    Life Chances Strategy Debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Lord Bishop of Truro asks for regular measurement of food insecurity levels in the country to be included in the life chances strategy.

    "If you are poor and food insecure then your chances will inevitably be less," he says.

    The bishop also says that there is already good focus on early years but argues, "we must not forget older children - people should not just have one chance".

    Bishop of Truro
  18. C2C line woes

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative David Amess has tabled the debate to raise the issue of timetable changes on the C2C line.

    The C2C line runs between London and Southend and is run by the National Express Group. 

    David Amess remembers travelling on the line before December 2015 as a happy experience.

    However it was in December that he received a phone call from the Managing Director of C2C to say that the timetable would be changed to increase the reliability of the service.

    "Within days [of the new timetable being introduced] I received literally dozens of emails complaining about how difficult their journeys had become." 

    Southend pier
    Image caption: Southend pier
  19. Debate has 'potential for good'

    Life Chances Strategy Debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Farmer begins his comments in the debate by lauding the record of David Cameron on the issue of addressing the life chances of young people, saying that from the beginning of his leadership of the Conservative Party and then as prime minister he has been committed to addressing "root and branch" the issue of poverty.

    He tells peers not to underestimate the "potential for good that our time together today holds".

    "One of the paramount roles of good government is ensuring everyone has the opportunity to flourish, whatever their starting point," he says.

    Lib Dem peer Baroness Tyler of Enfield says that a life chances strategy "must consider the entire life cycle", and also argues that there is no chance of increased life chances while entrenched inequalities remain .

  20. Treasury Committee session with Osborne ends

    Treasury Committee

    Select Committee

    Parliament

    The Treasury Committee session comes to an end after nearly two and a half hours, leaving George Osborne time to make it to his daughter's school play.