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Summary

  1. MPs met at 2.30pm for Defence questions, followed by an urgent question on junior doctors' contracts.
  2. MPs on the Communities and Local Government Committee took evidence on homelessness.
  3. The day's main business was two debates on the introduction of the National Living Wage; then educational attainment in Yorkshire and the Humber.
  4. After oral questions, peers examined the Housing and Planning Bill at report stage.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Patrick Cowling and Alex Partridge

All times stated are UK

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  1. House adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Minister John Penrose says "there has been plenty of care taken to gather all of the information that is out there" on voter fraud.

    Mr Penrose says that he has been told by the Department for Communities and Local Government there has been "huge progress in Tower Hamlets - but there is still further to go".

    The minister finishes his remarks and the day's business in the House of Commons comes to a close.

    That's all from us this evening - join us tomorrow from 11.30am for another day in parliament.

    Until then, goodnight.

  2. 'We must not be complacent on voter fraud'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Cabinet Office minister John Penrose is responding to the debate for the government.

    Mr Penrose thanks Mr Fitzpatrick for raising this issue, saying "this isn't only important for his constituency and borough, but has resonance in many parts of the country".

    "Thankfully voter fraud isn't something we deal with much in this country, but it is entirely wrong for us to become complacent about this issue", he says.

    Conservative MP Julian Lewis joins the minister in praising the "heroism" of the voters who took legal action over the issue.

    John Penrose
  3. Electoral fraud in Tower Hamlets

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lutfur Rahman, the ex-Mayor of Tower Hamlets, was found guilty of illegal practices in April 2015.

    Mr Rahman was first elected as Mayor of Tower Hamlets in 2010 and went on to be re-elected in 2014.

    The 2014 Mayoral election was voided and Labour's John Biggs won a new election in June 2015.

    The Election Court found Mr Rahman guilty of giving money to Bangladeshi or Muslim groups in return for support.

    A group of four voters took legal action against Mr Rahman over a series of allegations of election fraud in 2014.

    Election Commissioner Richard Mawrey said the evidence revealed "an alarming state of affairs".

  4. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate on educational attainment in Yorkshire and the Humber is brought to a close by Labour MP Jo Cox, and we move smoothly into the last business of the day - the adjournment debate led by the Labour MP for Poplar and Limehouse, Jim Fitzpatrick.

    Mr Fitzpatrick is leading this debate on the investigation into electoral fraud in Tower Hamlets.

  5. Government response

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Education minister Nick Gibb says that he "agrees entirely" with Jo Cox's statement that "nothing we do in this House is more important that making sure that no child is left behind".

    Whilst admitting the problems in attainment in Yorkshire and the Humber, the minister says "schools today are better than ever before with 1.4 million more children in good and outstanding schools than in 2010".

    In Yorkshire and Humber, Mr Gibb says that "compared with 2010, there are 209 more good and outstanding schools in August 2015, meaning 133,000 pupils attend a good school today".

    Nick Gibb concludes by saying "this government is determined that every area and region of the country will have rising academic standards".

  6. The role of teaching assistants

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Melanie Onn says that it is extremely important "for Yorkshire and the Humber to be here in the chamber today speaking up for children across our region".

    The MP for Great Grimsby raises the point that teaching assistants are "a huge resource for schools but are often under valued and not used effectively".

    "Unlike teachers there is no national pay structure for teaching assistants", Ms Onn tells the chamber, and says this often leads to situations where "when budgets are squeezed, those remaining have to take on more work, that they are not necessarily qualified to do, for less pay".

    Melanie Onn
  7. 'Strain' on teachers and pupils

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Greg Mulholland

    Liberal Democrat MP Greg Mulholland is now speaking to the debate.

    "It is unusual for a group of Yorkshire MPs having to have a debate about something where Yorkshire is not performing well" he says, pointing to Yorkshire successes in the 2012 Olympic Games, and the fact that the Yorkshire Pudding was recently "crowned best regional food in Britain".

    Mr Mulholland says that "the morale of teachers is a very serious concern" and points to statistics compiled by the NASWUT teacher's union that points to the mental and physical strain on teachers.

    The MP for Leeds North West also says that the "pressure being put on primary school pupils is leading to those young people being stressed", and saying he is now having to tell his own daughter to take some time away from doing homework "every single night".

  8. Engaged parenting 'makes a difference'

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Caroline Flint says that the loss of mining and industrial jobs in the region "cast a long shadow over children's potential".

    Ms Flint says that attainment gap issues "start well before children start in school".

    "Postcodes are a factor but parents are the most important influence on their children" she says, arguing that "confident engaged parenting does make a difference". 

    "We may have more teachers than ever before but they might not be the right teachers in the right places", the MP for Don Valley says, and warns of the dangers of competing academies poaching teachers off each other.

    Caroline Flint
  9. Support for academies

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Martin Vickers says he doesn't want to "paint a black picture" of his region, but says that reading the research does "hit home" the problems faced in Yorkshire and the Humber.

    Mr Vickers speaks very highly of the academies in his region as they have been "a considerable success". He is intervened on by a series of Labour MPs who argue that academies were brought in as a "tailored response" to under funding in certain local areas, and shouldn't be expanded across the whole school system.

    When faced with Labour MPs pointing to falling results in some new academies in his area, the MP for Cleethorpes argues that "it is a much broader issue than just the GCSEs, it is the opportunities that are opening up to our young people from these organisations".

  10. Amendment defeated

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The amendment has been defeated by 64 votes to 159.

    The next group of amendments are two government amendments which deal with how local authorities deal with rouge landlords. 

    Amendment 96 states that local authorities must be satisfied beyond reasonable doubt that the offence complained of has been committed before issuing a financial penalty.

    The amendment is unopposed and that concludes the day in the House of Lords.

    Peers return tomorrow at 2:30 for oral questions.

    House of Lords clock
  11. 'Wasted talent'

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dan Jarvis

    Labour MP Dan Jarvis says "unless we address the regional disparities in educational attainment then this country will become more divided".

    Mr Jarvis says that the other problem is that "this attainment gap wastes the talent of young people in our communities".

    The MP for Barnsley Central says that addressing poverty, raising aspiration, and ensuring strong leadership are the keys to tackling the regional attainment gap.

  12. Prosecuting rouge landlords

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The next amendment up for debate is Labour's amendment 95B.

    The amendment states that rouge landlords could be prosecuted in addition to being charged a financial penalty.

    The bill as it stands states that financial penalties can be used as an alternative to prosecution for certain offences.

    Viscount Younger of Leckie believes using both penalties and prosecutions for the same offence would be "disproportionate".

    Lord Kennedy says he is not satisfied with the government's response and pushes his amendment to a vote. 

  13. Attainment gap between boys and girls

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Conservative MP for Shipley Philip Davies is raising the issue of the "very worrying trend" of the attainment gap in Yorkshire, and elsewhere, between boys and girls in education.

    On the subject as a whole, he says that although there are some "very good schools with very good standards in Yorkshire", it is perfectly clear that standards are not good enough as a whole.

    Mr Davies says that many pupils in Bradford are starting from "a very low language base" which causes teachers to work in "very difficult circumstances". 

    Philip Davies
  14. Amendment rejected

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    For the first time today the government has won a vote in the House of Lords.

    The amendment is defeated by 89 votes to 167.

  15. The need for incentives

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Graham Stuart

    The former chair of the education committee, Conservative MP Graham Stuart agrees with Jo Cox in saying that "we need constantly to work to improve the incentives for the best teachers to teach in the poorest areas and to be rewarded for staying there".

    Mr Stuart warns other MPs from making a party political point on this issue, saying "this situation and divide was not created under this government".

    "There has long been this divide and we need to find a way with the maximum consensus possible of creating a framework of incentives to get the best teachers to the places they are needed most and which can transcend general elections" he says.

    The MP for Beverley and Holderness says that "without that we are going to continue to have this divide and have unnecessary tinkering and disruption in the education system".

  16. Peers divide

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers vote

    Labour's Lord Beecham remains unconvinced. 

    He accuses the government of adopting "a Janus-like posture" by giving one impression to the community affected and another to the general population.

    He describes the situation as unpalatable and pushes the amendment to a vote. 

  17. 'Real investment' needed

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jo Cox concludes her remarks saying "I recognise the answers to these problems will not be found easily but surely this growing divide in regional academic attainment can no longer be left unchallenged".

    "Nothing we do in this place matters more than ensuring that no child is left behind", she says.

    Ms Cox finishes saying "we need real investment and sustained political commitment" to address this issue.

  18. Gypsies and travellers

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The next group of amendments seeks to ensure that when assessing accommodation needs local housing authorities in England must consider "the needs of separate plots on which gypsies, travelers and travelling show people can have both residential accommodation and space for the storage of equipment".

    Viscount Younger of Leckie believes the amendments are not necessary as needs of such groups are already considered - "this clause does not change that".

    Dale Farm travellers site, Crays Hill, Essex
    Image caption: Dale Farm travellers site, Crays Hill, Essex
  19. The affect of where you are born on education

    Education in Yorkshire & the Humber debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Jo Cox says "for too long attention has focused narrowly on socio-economic inequality in determining academic achievement but we now know that it is not just the relative wealth of parents that holds back the potential of our children - it is also where they live".

    Ms Cox says that "regional disparities in attainment are already apparent by the end of primary school and are apparent even when you take into account things like ethnicity and income".

    The MP for Batley and Spen says "it is now clear that where you are born has become a more powerful predictive factor of your performance at school than any other". 

    Jo Cox
  20. Amendment withdrawn

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Williams says she appreciates the motivation behind Lord Watson's amendment agreeing that a stable environment is important for a child's upbringing.

    She therefore offers an undertaking to introduce an amendment at third reading allowing councils to extend tenancies to cover the time a child is in full time education.

    The amendment is therefore withdrawn.