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Summary

  1. After questions to the Welsh ministerial team, it was PMQs at noon.
  2. There was a debate on tax avoidance and evasion; and one of the schools White Paper.
  3. Peers started their day at 3pm; and after questions examined the Housing and Planning Bill at report stage.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James, Patrick Cowling and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

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  1. House adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The debate comes to an end and the House of Lords adjourns for the evening.

    Join us again tomorrow from 11am, when peers will be asking questions of government ministers, debating the use of House facilities by retired members, and debating the High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Bill at second reading.

    Until then, good night! 

  2. Technology advances 'nothing new'

    Machines and job creation debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe

    Business, Innovation and Skills minister Baroness Neville-Rolfe is responding to the debate for the government, and she says "great advances in technology are nothing new".

    "These advances have brought about huge changes to our society and to the world - and the net balance has been overwhelmingly positive." 

    The minister muses on the changing pace of the world to laughter in the chamber when she says "many of us may think that everything in life around us seems to be speeding up, although this may only be an illusion - maybe just one of the depressing effects of age." 

    Baroness Neville-Rolfe says that the government is committed to leveraging the UK's research and development community by "commercialising new and emerging technologies to bridge the gap and turning new ideas into innovative products and services".

  3. Adapting skill sets 'absolutely fundamental'

    Machines and job creation debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Opposition spokesperson Lord Mendelsohn replies to the debate for the Labour Party.

    He says that the debate raises the question of whether the future presents the issues of the past where old jobs were made obsolete but new jobs were created, or whether "there something about today that is markedly different".

    He says that whatever the future may hold "We have to invest - in training, education and skills, and in technology and science."

    "The continued adaption of skill sets is absolutely fundamental for successful participation in the labour market - more so than ever before." 

    Lord Mendelsohn
  4. Helping those 'left behind'

    Machines and job creation deabte

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Addington begins by saying that "even if the whole of society benefits - we always leave pockets behind".

    "The way that we deal with those pockets might be a better test of the society and how it works than looking at the overall picture", he says.

    "You end up wasting a great deal of money when you leave people behind."

    He finishes by saying that "unless we address this issue the rosy words we dress this subject with do not amount to much". 

  5. How do we deal with change?

    Machines and job creation debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Bishop of Derby

    The Bishop of Derby says that the subtext of the debate seems to be "how we deal with change".

    Speaking about the rise in zero hours contracts and predicting that technology will drive a call for further flexibility of working hours, the Bishop asks "what is going to be a responsible compact in future between employers and workers?".

    "We will need a much more radical understanding of the changing relationship between business and workers", he adds. 

  6. What does the report say?

    Machines and job creation debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Deloitte's report concluded that technology has created more jobs than it has destroyed in the last 144 years.

    The report found that technology has "been saving us from dull, repetitive and dangerous work".

    Agriculture was the first major sector to experience the change, the Deloitte report found - in 1871 it employed 6.6% of the workforce of England and Wales - today that stands at 0.2%, a 95% decline.

    Technological innovation has resulted in fewer humans being deployed as sources of muscle power, the report states, and says that more people are now engaged in jobs involving the nursing and care of others.

    1.1% of the workforce was employed in the caring sector in 1871, by 2011 it was almost a quarter in England and Wales.

    Technology has boosted employment in knowledge-intensive sectors like medicine and accounting, the report found.

    The report also found that technology has lowered the cost of essentials and raised disposable incomes.

  7. The need for education

    Machines and job creation debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Lord Fox also raises the issue of how education will be key in addressing the problems that technological improvements will pose in the future.

    Lord Fox tells the House of the problems in engineering of retaining interest and in providing jobs for young people - highlighting how retention is extremely poor amongst both girls and boys.

    The Liberal Democrat peer also says how government and schools need to make science, technology, engineering and maths more accessible to children, as the age at which children lose interest comes quite early. 

  8. 'We need to get this right'

    Machines and job creation debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Haskel tells the House that as a young man he trained as a bus conductor on the number 8 bus from Salford to Little Hulton. 

    Lord Haskel says that the job of a bus conductor went fairly quickly and says the drivers' job is going to be automated too. 

    He points out, as have other peers, that education will be key in this development.

    "Yes technology is creating more jobs - but the jobs are very different" he says, "and we need to get this right". 

    Lord Haskel
  9. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That's it from the Commons for today.

    MPs meet again from 9.30am tomorrow to put questions to the attorney general and women and equalities ministers.

    MPs take part in debates on the still-awaited Iraq Inquiry report and on diversity in the BBC.

  10. Machines end 'uncomfortable and dangerous jobs'

    Machines and job creation debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Borwick

    The Conservative peer Lord Borwick is leading this debate on the Deloitte report about ways in which machines create jobs.

    Lord Borwick begins his oration with a look back at centuries of concern amongst workers that machines would steal their jobs - from the Elizabethan era, through the Luddites of the industrial revolution, and more recently with the trade unions' concern about automation in factories in the 1970s.

    He says that history has shown that automation has ended a series of "uncomfortable and dangerous jobs".

    Lord Borwick finishes his opening remarks by saying: "It is great education that can solve the problems raised by technology".

  11. Legislative scrutiny over for the day

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have voted to reject amendment 71C by 80 votes to 185, a majority of 105.

    That brings to an end the report stage consideration of the Housing and Planning Bill for today after a very efficient day of parliamentary scrutiny, that has finished several hours ahead of time.

    Peers now move on to the short debate on Deloitte’s report Technology and people: The great job-creating machine published in August 2015.

  12. And finally... a spot of golf

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Karl McCartney

    Finally in the Commons tonight, Conservative MP Karl McCartney leads a short adjournment debate on the value of golf to the economy.

    The MP for Lincoln says that of course the sport has health benefits as well as economic ones.

  13. Clear the bar!

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government minister Baroness Williams of Trafford says that the government publishes many aspects of housing data that provides "a comprehensive and up to date picture of changes in housing stock".

    With this attempt to reassure them of the "extensive data" that is available, she asks the opposition to withdraw their amendment.

    Lord Kennedy of Southwark joins other peers in praising the "courteous and helpful" way that the government ministers, Baroness Williams of Trafford and Baroness Evans of Bowes Park, have listened to issues raised in the chamber.

    The ministers laugh as this praise is tempered by Labour's Lord Kennedy saying "having said that..." and indicating his wish to divide the House on amendment 71C.

    Baroness Williams of Trafford and Baroness Evans of Bowes Park
  14. Amended motion passed

    Schools White Paper debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The amended motion passes by 297 to 201, giving the government a majority of 96.

  15. Calls for a review of housing stock

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Hollis of Heigham

    Lord Kennedy's amendment 71C proposes a review to be held three years after the bill comes into force on the composition of local authority and housing association stock, and a report to be published on the findings.

    Baroness Hollis of Heigham says that the minister "owes us this amendment" because of what she calls a "lack of preparation" before bringing the bill to Parliament.

    The Labour peer says that the report is needed because the "skeletal scrutiny of a very skeletal bill" may have missed out "major issues" that may affect people in future.  

    Lord Harris of Haringey also supports his party's amendment, saying that a review is required because "this bill is littered with unintended consequences, or perhaps they are intended consequences - we don't know".

  16. Government amendment passes

    Schools White Paper debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs back the government's amendment by 302 votes to 204 - a majority of 98.

    This has the effect of changing Labour's motion competely, into one supportive of the government.

    Another division takes place on the amended motion.

  17. Last amendment of the evening

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have voted to reject amendment 71A by 115 votes to 206, a majority of 91.

    The House now moves on to consideration of the last amendment on the list this evening - amendment 71C, which is being moved by Labour spokesman Lord Kennedy of Southwark.

  18. Division on government amendment

    Schools White Paper debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons divides on the government's amendment to Labour's motion.

    The amendment "'welcomes the transformation in England’s schools since 2010 where 1.4 million more children are now taught in good or outstanding schools".

    It says that "the academies programme has been at the heart of that transformation because it trusts school leaders to run schools and empowers them with the freedom to innovate and drive up standards".

  19. Minister: Government is 'raising standards'

    Schools White Paper debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Schools Minister Nick Gibb

    Schools Minister Nick Gibb sums up on the debate for the government.

    He says the government is "raising standards" in schools and claims that many local authorities are seeing the benefit of "giving educational professionals control of their schools".

    Local authorities will continue to be "the champions of parents and pupils, in place planning, in administering admissions and ensuring that special educational needs are properly supported in their education".

    He says Labour is offering "nothing" on education.