Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. MPs and peers returned to Westminster after the Easter break.
  2. There was a statement on tax from Prime Minister David Cameron; as well as an update on the UK steel industry and on the government's EU referendum leaflets.
  3. MPs spent the rest of the day debating the Finance Bill.
  4. Peers asked ministers questions, followed by report stage of the Housing and Planning Bill.

Live Reporting

By Aiden James and Patrick Cowling

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    That concludes a very long first day back for MPs.

    The House meets again at 11am tomorrow for an emergency debate on the UK steel industry.

    It follows a request by shadow business secretary Angela Eagle during today's session, which gained the backing of her colleagues.

    Join us then for live coverage.

  2. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The final business tonight is the adjournment debate.

    Conservative MP Andrew Murrison opens a debate on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Given the busy day in the Commons, he jokes that he is relieved to be starting his debate "at this hour, rather than two o'clock in the morning, as was previously rumoured".

  3. MPs back bill at second reading

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs back the Finance Bill by 308 votes to 248, giving the government a majority of 60.

    Some clauses of the bill will now be considered in detail by MPs in a committee of the whole House at a future date.

    These include provisions on corporation tax, insurance premium tax and the climate change levy.

    Other provisions will be considered by a public bill committee away from the main chamber.

  4. Second reading vote

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Commons division

    The debate on the general principles of the Finance Bill concludes and the House divides to vote on giving the bill a second reading.

  5. Minister responds

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Damian Hinds

    Exchequer Secretary Damian Hinds responds for the government, arguing that policies such as the lifetime ISA and the help-to-save programme encourage saving.

    On tax transparency, he says overseas territories "do have to play their part", insisting that territory leaders have agreed to hold central registers of "beneficial ownership".

    The Finance Bill contains further measures against "multinational tax avoidance", he adds.

  6. Chancellor 'borrowing like a drunken sailor'

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Treasury minister Rob Marris welcomes two million extra jobs in the economy but claims they have been "bought on a sea of debt".

    He also says the Panama Papers reveal the British Virgin Islands to be "the number one" offshore tax haven and so far "only two" overseas territories have agreed to a register of the real owners of companies.

    He then resumes an attack on George Osborne:

    Quote Message: The chancellor is borrowing like a drunken sailor, using the nation's credit card to pay the day-to-day bills. That's just plain wrong and it will end in tears."
  7. SNP: We have to oppose Budget

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    George Kerevan

    SNP MP George Kerevan argues that the government's policy of running permanent budget surpluses will discourage saving and investment.

    He predicts money will go overseas and there will be a "big demand for offshore investment trusts".

    This was not a Budget "for savings" he says, adding: "This is why we have to oppose it."

  8. UK 'has leverage' over offshore tax havens

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP John Mann says the UK has influence over its overseas territories which act as tax havens.

    "We pay for their defence," he says. "We have leverage."

    He adds:

    Quote Message: They need to abide by our rules."
    John Mann
  9. Amendments on corporate profits

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Caroline Flint urges the government to accept provisions from a private members' bill she has introduced on reporting of multinational corporations' profits.

    She argues it is unfair that corporations can move profits around the world rather than paying tax in the country in which they made them.

    She calls on the government to accept the measures in the form of amendments to the Finance Bill. 

  10. Last amendment of the night defeated

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers reject amendment 38 by 41 votes to 146, a majority of 105.

    That brings to an end the day's consideration of the Housing and Planning Bill and the House of Lords adjourns for the evening.

    Peers will return tomorrow at 2.30pm with oral questions, followed by the Immigration Bill, Energy Bill and Northern Ireland Bill.

  11. 'Omnishambles' recalled

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rachel Reeves

    Labour MP Rachel Reeves recalls her time as shadow chief secretary to the Treasury during the so-called "omnishambles" Budget of 2012.

    She argues the 2016 Budget "unraveled" more quickly than the 2012 one, with changes to disability benefits and pensions tax relief being dropped.

    "The political prospects of the chancellor have unraveled" along with his Budget, she tells MPs.

  12. Division on guardianship schemes

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Beecham

    Peers have divided to vote on amendment 38, which attempts to set out a set of standards for property guardianship schemes.

    The amendment would extend certain tenant rights to people in property guardianship schemes that they currently do not have.

    Under the schemes, tenants are brought in to vacant properties to deter squatters and vandalism.

    Lord Beecham says that the minister has given "a completely unacceptable answer" to his questions and so pushes the amendment to a division.

  13. Small businesses 'the engine of growth'

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP David Warburton welcomes cuts to corporation tax and changes to business rates.

    "Anyone who has run a small business knows that business rates can take up an intimidatingly large proportion of fixed costs," he says.

    He calls small businesses "the engine of growth".

    However, he criticises some large corporations, alleging they "skip around in the no man's land between tax avoidance and evasion".

  14. Amendment defeated

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have rejected amendment 35 by 157 votes to 50, a majority of 107.

    The government have now defeated three amendments today, and the debate comes on to the home straight as Lord Beecham moves amendment 38 - the target for today's legislative scrutiny.

  15. Division on Amendment 35

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Kennedy has decided to push the House to a vote on amendment 35 - the fifth of the day so far.

    Amendment 35 would insert the following clause into the bill relating to tenant deposit protection:

    Quote Message: Upon the coming into force of this section, the secretary of state must undertake a review of tenancy deposit schemes, as introduced under sections 212 to 215 of the Housing Act 2004 (tenancy deposit schemes), in order to ensure that tenants are treated fairly at the end of their tenancy.”
  16. UK territories are 'number one' tax haven, claims MP

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Roger Mullin

    SNP MP Roger Mullin attacks the government's Budget and says the Finance Bill "presages yet more failure".

    His speech focuses on tax havens which, he claims, "hide one sixth of the world's total private wealth".

    "Panama doesn’t even make the top ten of tax havens," Mr Mullin says, while the UK and "her overseas territories are number one".

  17. Tenant deposit protection

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Tope and Baroness Hayter agree not to move their amendments relating to electrical safety checks, after assurances from the government that the issue will be addressed by ministers.

    The debate moves on to amendment 35, which is moved by Labour spokesman Lord Kennedy of Southwark and relates to a review of deposit protection for tenants.

    Lord Kennedy says the purpose of the review is to ensure that tenants are treated fairly at the end of their tenancy. He says that often tenants need deposits from one tenancy for the next property they are moving into.

    Lord Kennedy of Southwark
  18. Bill 'rewards saving and work'

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Nigel Mills rises to support the Finance Bill.

    He says it "rewards saving, rewards work" and cracks down on "aggressive tax avoidance".

    However, he calls for more transparency from large companies, including "making them publish their tax returns". 

  19. Electrical safety checks

    Housing and Planning Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Evans

    Peers are now debating an extensive group of amendments that relate to electrical safety checks in rental accommodation.

    Amendment 33, moved by Labour peer Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town and Liberal Democrat Lord Tope, would establish a requirement to carry out electrical safety checks in rented accommodation.

    The government has tabled a number of amendments relating to this issue and minister Baroness Evans of Bowes Park says that the proposals have support "across the sector".

  20. Labour to oppose Finance Bill

    Finance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "We will vote against this Finance Bill because it is unfair," Labour's Seema Malhotra says.

    The shadow minister says the bill "fails the test of moving Britain forwards to a more prosperous future".