Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. MPs have questioned London Mayor Boris Johnson on the costs and benefits of the UK's EU membership.
  2. MPs had Scotland questions followed by PMQs.
  3. The main business of the day in the Commons was the High Speed Rail Bill.
  4. The House of Lords considered a series of orders and regulations on combined authorities in Greater Manchester and the Tees Valley.
  5. Peers considered the Housing and Planning Bill at committee stage.
  6. MPs also considered a motion on Short money, the money given to opposition parties in the Commons; as well as the Scotland Bill.
  7. Lib Dem Norman Lamb introduced a ten minute rule bill to legalise cannabis.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis, Chris Davies and Habiba Khanom

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. Lords adjourns for Easter

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Lords has adjourned for a short Easter break.

    They will be back on the 11th April, when they will go right back to the Housing and Planning Bill, this time at report stage.

  2. Housing bill passes committee stage

    Housing Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Parminter withdraws her amendment and the Housing and Planning Bill passes committee stage. 

  3. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And with that business in the House of Commons is brought to a close.

    MPs will return at 9.30am tomorrow for their last day in the Commons before a short Easter Break.

    Most of the day will be dedicated to backbench business - first a debate on court closures and then the debate on the Easter adjournment, in which MPs can speak about any subject that takes their fancy.

  4. HSE meeting targets

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Work and Pensions Minister Justin Tomlinson

    Work and Pensions Minister Justin Tomlinson defends the work of the Health and Safety Executive (HSE).

    He says the HSE has a target to conclude all investigations "in which it takes primacy" within 12 months, and 80% of investigations meet this target.

    He admits "this does not always happen" as often "prosecutions cannot start until after a coroners inquest" which can delay proceedings.

    He argues that the average figures quoted by Stephen Hepburn "can be affected by a few complex cases" that take a long time.

    The HSE is now looking at publishing "a median average" to give a better indication of how long most cases take.

  5. 'Lessons to be learnt' from last years flooding

    Housing Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Williams

    Local Government Minister Baroness Williams says there are "lessons to be learnt" from last years floods.

    She tells the House that the government is undertaking a review of flood defences.

    She says that sustainable drainage measures are expected to be in place in all major new developments.

    She says the amendments proposed by peers would increase the risk of disputes between developers and insurers, and argues that existing planning laws are sufficient to deal with the problem.

  6. 'Effective policeman'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    He adds that between 2012/13 and 2014/15 the number of unannounced inspections in the UK construction industry declined by 8.7%.

    "In order to ensure that this positive trend continues it is essential that the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is an effective policeman". 

    Only the genuine threat of being "prosecuted by the HSE" will force these companies to respect safety laws, he argues.

  7. 'Justice denied'

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Stephen Hepburn tells MPs that "families are being forced to put their lives on hold for years and years while they wait for those responsible for the death of their loved ones to be brought to justice".

    On average it now takes nearly 2 and a half years  before a prosecution begins following a fatal construction accident and three and half years for a conviction, he says.

    But "the worst cases are much worse" he adds, and relates the case of Falcon Cranes who last week were fined £750,000 following the deaths of two people when a crane collapsed in Battersea, south London. That accident occurred in September 2006.

    "Justice delayed is nearly as great a failure as justice denied ".

    Stephen Hepburn
  8. Peer says bill not properly scruitinised

    Housing Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Campbell-Savours

    Labour's Lord Campbell-Savours says the House has not been able to discuss "all the controversial elements of the bill" because they will be introduced as secondary legislation, which the House of Lords cannot amend.

  9. Fatal accidents compensation

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now turn to the adjournment debate - today led by Labour's Stephen Hepburn on the prosecution of construction companies for fatal accidents.

    Mr Hepburn is calling for the Health and Safety Executive to be "an effective policeman" to end fatal workplace accidents in the construction industry.

  10. Government concession on short money approved

    Short money motion

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs are have approved a government concession on plans to slash funding for opposition parties - so called "short money".

    The government had planned a cut of 28% over the course of the current parliament, but have now agreed to what amounts to a real terms cut of 5%.

    "Short Money" is funding given to opposition parties to support their parliamentary work, which pays for assorted researchers and special advisor types. It's named after Edward Short, a former Leader of the House of Commons who established the funds.

  11. Motion approved

    Motion on European Communities Act

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have approved the government's analysis of the budget, which will now be sent to the EU Commission to ensure the UK complies with Section 5 of the European Communities (Amendment) Act 1993.

    MPs voted 241 to 180 in favour of the motion.

  12. Gauke welcomes 'first admission' that Labour borrowed too much

    Motion on European Communities Act

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate David Gauke congratulates Rob Marris for "admitting Labour borrowed too much" - the "first time he has heard an admission from Labour".

    He counters Mr Marris' attacks on the government saying that if the Treasury had continued the policies they inherited in 2010 "by 2020 we would have borrowed £913bn over that 10 year period".

  13. Flood risk

    Housing Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Parminter

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Parminter introduces a group of amendments concerned with flood risk.

    She argues that many developments on flood plains do not take the danger of flooding into account.

    The amendments would require these developments to meet sustainable drainage standards.

  14. Tope amendment withdrawn

    Housing Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Tope withdraws his amendment, and the House approves a set of technical amendments moved by the government.

  15. 'Completely pointless exercise'

    Motion on European Communities Act

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP John Redwood calls the submission to the EU commission a "completely pointless exercise".

    The Eurosceptic says he can't see the point of the Treasury "having to table 300 pages of documentation" and go through this application procedure only to maybe receive a report. 

    "It is a great pity that in the renegotiation that this wasn't one of the things that got sorted out" he argues.

    "It is about time we ask our neighbours why we go through this routine."

    Conservative MP John Redwood
  16. Mayors and public sector land

    Housing Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Tope

    Liberal Democrat Lord Tope moves a group of amendments which would give the mayors of combined authorities the right of first refusal of surplus public sector land which becomes available. 

    Minister Lord Bridges says the bill will ensure that surplus land is made available in a "timely manner".

    He says that Lord Tope's amendments are not needed and will increase levels of bureaucracy.

  17. Sir William may vote against the government

    Motion on European Communities Act

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Sir Bill Cash

    Conservative Sir Bill Cash says he is "inclined to vote against the government this evening" because he thinks the figures being submitted are inaccurate.

    He goes on to say the European Stability and Growth Pact is not enforced fairly across the continent, accusing Germany of altering to its own advantage, but not allowing countries like Greece to do the same.

  18. Marris: jobs brought on a 'sea of debt'

    Motion on European Communities Act

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rob Marris goes on to attack the government's economic record.

    He says the jobs created since 2010 have been "brought on a sea of debt", and adds that median earnings fell under the coalition government.

    He argues the government has been selling assets which should have been preserved for the next generation.

    He tells the House that it is "not true" that the UK is an economic example to other European countries.

  19. Labour front-bencher attacks Gordon Brown

    Motion on European Communities Act

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rob Marris

    Shadow treasury minister Rob Marris says that Labour "lacked economic credibility" in the 2015 general election.

    He argues that the financial crash in 2008 was to blame for many of Britain's economic problems.

    However he describes some Labour policies, including light touch banking regulation, were a mistake.

    He says Gordon Brown "arrogantly ignored the warnings some of us gave him before the crash".

  20. Minister claims UK economy an example for Europe

    Motion on European Communities Act

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Nuttall

    Conservative eurosceptic David Nuttall asks what the benefit of going through this process, which he calls a "charade", every year brings his constituents.

    David Gauke replies that the UK could set a positive example to other European countries, and "we shouldn't be hiding our light under a bushel"