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Summary

  1. MPs debated George Osborne's Budget.
  2. MPs questioned ministers from the Department for Communities and Local Government
  3. There was an urgent question on changes to the Budget; then two statements. The first was on the European summit and the second on welfare.
  4. The House of Lords had a packed day, with consideration of the Scotland Bill and Immigration Bill.
  5. The Public Administration Committee examined inter-institutional relations in the UK.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis, Chris Davies and Habiba Khanom

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. End of Lords coverage for the day

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers are continuing to discuss the Immigration Bill at report stage but we’re going to leave our live coverage for tonight. You can continue to watch the House of Lords on by clicking on the tab above, where coverage continues.

    You’ll also be able to catch up with coverage of the House of Lords on the BBC Parliament iPlayer, and you can follow on Parliament’s own online service.

    Thanks for reading – and please join us for more from the Commons and Lords tomorrow.

  2. Government says amendments not needed

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bates

    Home Office Minster Lord Bates says the majority of care leavers are not affected by the bill.

    He tells the House that the government will set out more details of the government's policy by the third reading of the bill in order to respond to peers concerns.

    He asks that the amendments are withdrawn and peers agree.

  3. Care leavers seeking asylum

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    The Earl of Listowe

    The Earl of Listowel is moving a group of amendments which are concerned with the assistance young people receive from local authorities.

    The bill creates a separate care system for children seeking asylum. The amendment aims to ensure these young people get the help they might need with their applications.

  4. Peers reject amendment

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have voted against amendment 122A by 134 votes to 91 - a majority of 43

  5. Division on amendment debated earlier today

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have divided on amendment 122A, which was debated earlier today.

    This amendment would widen the categories of people who would be allowed to move to the UK to join relatives who have been granted asylum already.

  6. Amendment rejected

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have rejected the amendment which would grant asylum to those who worked for the British government in Iraq and Afghanistan by 136 to 60 - a majority of 76.

  7. Division

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Ashton

    Minister Lord Ashton says we owe "a duty" to people who worked for the government in Iraq and Afghanistan, and adds that the government has "done quite a lot" to help them.

    He says that 600 of them have been resettled in the UK.

    Although he says he can't accept the amendment he is willing to speak to the Ministry of Defence if peers believe existing schemes are not working.

    Lord Dubs says he will withdraw the amendment on that basis, but peers decide to divide on it.

  8. Asylum for people who worked for the UK in Iraq and Afghanistan

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Dubs

    Labour's Lord Dubs is introducing an amendment which would grant asylum to staff who formerly worked for the UK Government in Iraq or Afghanistan.

    Up to 600 Afghan interpreters who worked alongside British troops have been given the right to live in the UK, but there are concerns that large numbers of people are excluded.

    Read more here.

  9. Peers reject amendment

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers have rejected the genocide amendment by 148 votes to 111 - a majority of 37.

  10. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    And with that business in the House of Commons is brought to a close. 

    MPs will be back at 11.30am tomorrow when the main business will be George Osborne's response to the debate on the Budget. Many MPs thought he should have been in the Commons today responding to accusations levelled at him byIain Duncan Smith and have been saving up their questions for him. 

    Join us then.

  11. Division

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Alton says that he may be in a minority, but he calls a division on the amendment about genocide.

    If passed the amendment would allow the high court to rule if a genocide has been committed, and grant its victims the right to claim asylum.

  12. Government response

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Health Minister Ben Gummer replies that he has met the Director of Nursing at Mid Yorkshire Trust and was "assured on some points" around staffing.

    He adds that the Trust is complying with Lord Carter's review of staffing ratios and will "look carefully at how they rota their staff, to make sure they're doing it properly" based on the guidance from the review.

    He says this will help the Trust to have the "tools do the job".

    Ben Gummer
  13. Government reject genocide amendment

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Keen

    Minister Lord Keen of Elie says the amendment will not achieve what it is supposed to.

    He says that it would allow people to claim asylum from a country outside of the UK, which would cause problems in the future.

    He notes that there are 19.5m refugees in the world, and the amendment would open up the immigration system to all of them. 

    He argues that "no country in the world" has an immigration policy like the one suggested in the amendment.

  14. 'Serious concerns' over NHS Trust staffing

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move to today's final business, the adjournment debate. Today's is on staffing levels in Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust led by Labour MP for Dewsbury, Paula Sherriff.

    Ms Sherriff tells MPs that a series of inspections of the trust have found "serious concerns over staffing levels".

    She says there is a "significant shortage of nurses, which is having a knock on effect on patient care."

    led by Labour MP for Dewsbury, Paula Sherriff.
  15. Delaying tactics

    Point of order

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Order of business

    Conservative MP Cheryl Gillan raises a point of order to ask about a particularly arcane standing order - the rules that govern the business in the House of Commons.

    She raises the point of order to make sure that it is after 10pm before the next motion is tabled. If the motion, which sets out the passage of the High Speed Rail (London - West Midlands) Bill through parliament, is moved after 10pm it cannot be debated and can be delayed until the next day.

    Effectively Ms Gillan is opposed to the bill and is seeking to prevent the bill being passed quickly through the Commons. 

    She asks the Speaker to confirm that objecting to the bill "is not actually impeding the government as the government can table the same bill for the next day".

    The Speaker John Bercow replies Mrs Gillan is correct.

    And that takes it past 10pm.

  16. Labour 'unconvinced' by genocide amendment

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Rosser

    Labour's Lord Rosser says "we all have sympathy with what lies behind this amendment", but adds that he thinks it is "unworkable" in its current form.

    He says Labour "is not convinced" the power to declare a genocide has happened should be given to a domestic court.

    Labour will not support the amendment in a vote.

  17. Peer says practicalities need 'though'

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Green

    Lord Green describes what is happening in Iraq and Syria as "repulsive" and says they do amount to genocide.

    He says that if the amendment is passed, in future "hundreds of claimants" from other conflicts could end up outside UK missions wanting to claim asylum. 

    He says that the practicalities of the amendment "need some further thought".

  18. Budget will allow 'regions to go from strength to strength'

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Economic Secretary to the Treasury Harriet Baldwin accuses John Healey of "preparing his sound bites earlier".

    The "foundations of success are in each and every corner of this country" she argues, and this budget "will allow our regions to continue going from strength to strength".

    She goes on to say with the "deficit down by two thirds we are well on our way to surplus".

    Economic Secretary to the Treasury Harriet Baldwin
  19. Conservative opposes genocide amendment

    Immigration Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Baroness Berridge

    Conservative Baroness Berridge says she will not be supporting the amendment.

    She argues that allowing domestic courts to decide what constitutes a genocide runs the risk of courts in other countries coming to a different conclusion and undermining the charge.

    She reminds peers that this law would not just apply to Iraq and Syria, but to all countries, encouraging claims of genocide from people in other places who wish to claim asylum as a result.

  20. Budget a 'government failure of the chancellors own making'

    Budget debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow housing and planning minister John Healey is responding to the debate for Labour.

    "Indefensible. deeply unfair and distinctly political. My words but also the words of former Work and Pensions Secretary [Iain Duncan Smith]".

    "Our judgement but also the judgement of many fair-minded Conservative MPs and the British people - who were polled over the weekend and said the government had got its priorities wrong".

    "This is a government failure of [the chancellors] own making," he says, and adds that the government has no policies to respond to the country's "housing crisis".

    Shadow housing and planning minister John Healey