Got a TV Licence?

You need one to watch live TV on any channel or device, and BBC programmes on iPlayer. It’s the law.

Find out more
I don’t have a TV Licence.

Summary

  1. MPs debated a series of private members' bills.

Live Reporting

By Gary Connor

All times stated are UK

Get involved

  1. 'No plans' to establish convention

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "The government has no plans to establish a convention on democracy," says Cabinet Office Minister Rob Wilson.

    He says the government's focus is on delivering a "fair and balanced constitutional settlement for the rest of the UK", he adds. 

    And with that, today's Commons sitting comes to an end. 

    MPs will return at 2:30pm on Monday afternoon, for education questions and the second reading of the Policing and Crime Bill. 

    Rob Wilson
  2. Citizen's convention on democracy

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs now move onto the final business of the day, an adjournment debate on a citizen's convention on democracy.

    Former chair of the Political and Constitutional Reform Committee Graham Allen, has tabled the debate.

    Mr Allen says that democracy in the UK "is in a bad way" and that his debate can help point people back "on the right way". 

    Graham Allen
  3. Fans 'sustain' football clubs

    Football Governance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    "It is the fans that have sustained the clubs for generations, and it'll be the fans sustaining the clubs when the owners are gone," says Labour's Wayne David.

    He says the proposals in the bill are "modest and coherent" and hopes the government will support them.

    Culture Minister David Evenett says that the government will not support the bill, but hopes that the Football Association can make progress in proposals to allow fan representation on boards.

    The bill runs out of time, and debate will be resumed on a future date, but it is unlikely to progress further. 

    David Evenett
  4. Labour MP gives backing to 'first class' legislation

    Football Governance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Stephen Pound calls the bill a piece of "first class legislation" and goes on to describe the "disconnect" between what goes on on the pitch and in the boardroom.

    "A football club is not something you pick up and put down. It is part of a community", he adds. 

    Mr Pound says he could speak for "so long" on this subject but won't. 

    He asks fellow MPs to support the bill. 

    Stephen Pound
  5. Fans 'not listened to' at clubs

    Football Governance Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Clive Efford, who has proposed the bill, says it is "clear" that fans are "underrepresented and not listen to" at many football clubs. 

    Making a more general point about world football governance, he says that FIFA is "unreformable" and should be replaced by a new governing body. 

    On recent reports relating to a rumoured plot among big European clubs to form a breakaway European super league, he says any English clubs agreeing to take part in any such scheme should be denied entry to the FA. 

    He adds that the forthcoming new TV deal, which will greatly increase Premier League club's TV revenue, underlines the need for the link between clubs and their local communities to be strengthened. 

    Clive Efford
  6. MPs move to football club governance bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Christopher Chope says he hopes that, with a vote to leave the EU in June, the government will never have to consider the bill. 

    He decides, however, to withdraw it - to which MPs agree. 

    MPs now move on to discussing the Football Governance (Supporters’ Participation) Bill at second reading.

    The bill would require football clubs to offer for sale to their supporters a specified percentage of shares in the club upon a change of ownership.

    It would also require a minimum number of places on a club’s board to be set aside for election by a qualifying supporters’ organisation. 

  7. Public 'yearning for information' on Parliament role

    European Parliament Elections Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    More information about the role of European Parliamentarians, particularly closer to elections, might have the effect of improving turnout, suggests Cabinet Office Minister Rob Wilson.

    "One of the things the public is yearning for, particularly in light of this referendum, is more information, more facts", he adds. 

    Mr Wilson says that he knows that there is some "dissatisfaction" with the closed list system, but that changing it is not one of the government's priorities. 

    Rob Wilson
  8. Minister: No plans to back changes 'at present time'

    European Parliament Elections Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Replying to the debate, Cabinet Office Minister Rob Wilson says the government is "sympathetic" to many of the arguments in favour of moving to an open list system. 

    In particular, he says he acknowledges that it might help correct the problem of individual MEPs being seen as "distant" from their electorates. 

    However, he notes that "every electoral system has its pros and cons". 

    He says for the moment, the government has no plans to look into changing the system "at the present time". 

    Rob Wilson
  9. Labour MP: 'Debate to be had' on current system

    European Parliament Elections Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Cabinet Office minister Wayne David says he acknowledges that there are "strong arguments" against the current system. 

    He adds that the system can depersonalise the process by denying voters the possibility of voting for an individual. 

    However, he says that it also creates a system of representation that is "more reflective of population as a whole", and puts on the "onus" on political parties to ensure a gender balance in their lists. 

    He says there is a "debate to be had" on the issue, and that he looks forward to hearing the government's response.  

    Wayne David
  10. European Parliament elections bill introduced

    European Parliament Elections Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Christopher Chope introduces his European Parliament Elections Bill, which he hopes will shortly be made "redundant", referring to the upcoming EU referendum.

    The bill would change the system of election to the Parliament to an open regional list system.

    Under an open list, voters could choose specific candidates from a list provided by the political parties.

    At the moment, voters can only vote for a political party in their region - whose candidates are chosen by the parties themselves. 

    Flags
  11. MP withdraws bill

    Illegal Immigrants Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Christopher Chope says that the bill would make clear that "the very act of coming into this country without authority would be a criminal act," after the minister indicates that the government cannot support his bill.

    He says there is a "fundamental difference" in the approach to illegal immigration that the government is taking and that he wishes to take.

    "I fear that it's too late in this session of parliament for this bill to get onto the statute books, and I seek leave to withdraw it," Mr Chope says in conclusion.  

    His request is approved. 

    Christopher Chope
  12. Minister: Measures in bill are 'not necessary'

    Illegal Immigrants Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Communities and Local Government Minister Richard Harrington says that the government understands the intentions of the bill, but that it over-simplifies the situation.

    He continues by telling MPs that it is only right that migrants who don't have leave to stay here are returned home.

    "I don't believe that the measures that the bill contains are necessary," says Mr Harrington, indicating that the government will not support the bill. 

    Richard Harrington
  13. Labour MP: Bill would 'further complicate' immigration system

    Illegal Immigrants Bill

    Shadow Home Office minister Lyn Brown says that she agrees illegal immigration is a "really important issue", but that she doesn't believe that Mr Chope's bill "would actually work". 

    She says that there is a risk it could simply "further complicate" an "already complicated immigration system", and actually increase the obstacles against an authority wishing to deport someone. 

    She adds that it might also increase bureaucracy, and create "huge disincentives" for people to voluntarily leave. 

    She tells MPs that people in the country illegally "do face" the sanction of deportation, which hangs as a "massive threat" over the heads of many. 

    It would not alter the incentives drawing people to come to the UK illegally, she adds, and "at best" would be "superfluous". 

    Lyn Brown
  14. 'Worse situation' on illegal immigration

    Illegal Immigrants Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    David Nuttall tells MPs that the situation that the country is in regarding illegal immigration is worse than when a similar incarnation of the bill was debated two years ago.

    "There has been no improvement in the situation, certainly among public opinion," Mr Nuttall adds.

    He says that it is worthwhile recalling that the earlier bill was "tested" by Lord Ashcroft, who carried out polling about what the public thought of the bill, with 86% agreeing with its measures. 

    David Morris rises to "take exception to that" because the general election showed that polls weren't always accurate.

    "They weren't asking for a prediction, they were asking what they thought of those measures at that point," David Nuttall replies. 

    David Nuttall
  15. 'Obsessing' about eastern European immigration

    Illegal Immigrants Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Continuing, Sir Edward adds that MPs "obsess" too much about legal migration from eastern Europe, which is legal and understood, whilst forgetting what is in their control.  

    "This matter of illegal migration is surely under our control and is running at staggering levels", he says. 

    "The people want to know what the government is doing about it", he adds. 

    Sir Edward Leigh
  16. 'System in disrepute'

    Illegal Immigrants Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    In terms of illegal entry into this country, the system is out of control, Sir Edward Leigh tells MPs.

    There is widespread public disquiet about this and it is not good for good relations between different communities, he continues.

    "The whole system is being brought into disrepute", he adds. 

    Sir Edward Leigh
  17. UK a 'soft touch' for illegal migrants

    Illegal Immigrants Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative MP Christopher Chope is now introducing his Illegal Immigrants (Criminal Sanctions) Bill.

    The bill would imprison anyone present in the UK "without legal authority" for up to six months.

    Offenders could also be subject to fines of up to £5,000, and would be deported.

    He tells MPs that the UK is a "soft touch for" illegal migrants, and they are only deported "extremely rarely".

    He adds that this gives them a "perverse incentive" to come to the UK. 

    Christopher Chope
  18. Minister assured bill 'will not compromise' road safety

    Driving Instructors Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Transport Minister Andrew Jones gives the government's backing to the bill, calling it a "significant change".

    "I am reassured that this bill will not compromise road safety, it will merely simplify access to the profession."

    Labour's shadow transport secretary Lilian Greenwood says she welcomes the bill's "sensible measures", and the "opportunities it provides" to instructors who take a career break.

    The bill passes third reading and will move to the House of Lords. 

  19. Bill 'to benefit' returning instructors

    Driving Instructors Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Sir David Amess opens the debate, and gives members examples of how the bill will have a positive impact on instructors who have to take a break from work.

    "The bill will work to benefit instructors like a recent ADI (approved driving instructor) whose membership lapsed after a heart attack", he says. 

    He adds that the simplified procedures would "allow an ADI to be back at work in six weeks, rather than the 34 weeks it takes to re-qualify". 

    David Amess
  20. Moving on...

    Driving Instructors Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The House of Commons Members' Fund Bill passes third reading unopposed and will continue its legislative journey in the House of Lords.

    MPs now move on to debating the Driving Instructors (Registration) Bill, at third reading

    Professional driving instructors in Great Britain must be registered as an "approved driving instructor".

    The bill allows an instructor to request voluntary removal from the register, and simplifies the process of returning. 

    L plate