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Summary

  1. MPs questioned Lord Willetts and former minister Steve Webb on the intergenerational gap.
  2. MPs began the day's work in the chamber at 11.30am, with Northern Ireland questions; followed by the weekly Prime Minister's questions.
  3. There were two urgent questions: the first on the government review of the state pension age followed by a question on the humanitarian crisis in Greece.
  4. The main business of the day was the Estimates Day debate, when MPs discussed the science budget and end of life care.
  5. The Commons also looked at Lords' amendments to the Welfare Reform and Work Bill.
  6. Peers met at 3pm, and after questions spent the day debating the EU and the UK's referendum.

Live Reporting

By Sam Francis, Chris Davies and Gary Connor

All times stated are UK

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  1. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Peers agree to the European Union Referendum (Date of Referendum etc.) Regulations 2016, confirming that the EU referendum will officially take place on 23 June.

    And with that business in the Houses of Parliament is brought to a close.

    Peers will return at 11am tomorrow, where the main business will be the Housing and Planning Bill.

  2. Government response

    EU renegotiated status

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Government spokesman Lord Faulks responds to tells peers that the renegotiated status leaves the UK "in the driving seat in the worlds largest single market but out of the parts of Europe that do not work for us".

    Responding to the debate he says the UK is "out of the Euro, out of Eurozone bailouts, the borders-free Schengen area and legally protected from being drawn in to ever closer union".

    "The Government has made its position clear it is in the UK’s national interest – the interests of every family, household, business, community, region and nation within our United Kingdom – to remain in a reformed EU."

    He calls on peers to vote to approve the motion to allow the EU referendum to take place on 23 June and "let the people decide."

    Government spokesman Lord Faulks
  3. Labour response

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Shadow leader of the House of Lords Baroness Smith of Basildon argues the "reasons we should remain in the UK are so much deeper than one renegotiation deal with the EU". 

    Summing up for the Labour party she tells peers the EU is about "securing peace and prosperity".

    To Labour the EU is "about standards, protecting our environment, ensuring that customers aren't ripped off with dodgy goods, support and protection for workers across the EU and making sure one country is not pitted against the other in a race to the bottom". 

    The Labour peer adds she finds it a "bit rich" for the leave campaign to claim staying in the EU exposes the UK to the risk of Paris style attacks and "then accuse others of fear tactics".

    Shadow leader of the House of Lords Baroness Smith of Basildon
  4. Lib Dems 'fully united behind UK in Europe'

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Winding up the debate for the Liberal Democrats Baroness Ludford says her party remain "fully united behind our 70 year support of the UK in Europe".

    She calls remaining in Europe the "patriotic choice, playing to our strength and multiplying our ability to promote our interest". 

    Liberal Democrats Baroness Ludford
  5. Forsyth: Scotland will not leave the Union over EU

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former Scottish secretary Lord Forsyth of Drumlean attacks the "utterly irresponsible" argument that "if we vote to leave the EU it will threaten the integrity of the Union [with Scotland]".

    "This is a ridiculous debate as there is no appetite for a second referendum in Scotland" he tells peers, as the Prime Minister has "stuffed Scotland's mouth with gold".

    "No scot in their right mind will vote for bankruptcy which is what independence will be." 

    Lord Forsyth also responds to Lord Kerr of Kinlochard's comments, mockingly congratulating Lord Kerr on remaining an "expert in presenting a disaster as a triumph" - a skill he says Lord Kerr built up as a diplomat.

    Lord Forsyth of Drumlean
  6. Lamont: UK should have a relationship on economics alone

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former chancellor Lord Lamont of Lerwick tell peers "it has not been an easy decision" to join the leave campaign.

    But in the end he says he decided that the UK should have a relationship with the EU based on "economics and economics alone".

    The Conservative peer, who was chancellor between 1990 and 1993, says the key question is whether countries will still want to negotiate with the UK on trade. 

    He argues they will, and that will allow the UK to remain an economic power but without any of the baggage of the EU.

    Former chancellor Lord Lamont of Lerwick t
  7. Kerr: Thatcher would stay in EU

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Former British Representative to the European Union, and crossbench peer, Lord Kerr of Kinlochard says he believes Margaret Thatcher would want to remain in the European Union,  but would be "bustling over to Brussels to sort out the Schengen nonsense and do something about Syria".

    He tells peers that when he worked as a diplomat working in Europe for Mrs Thatcher she "wanted us to be in every room , playing a central part, at every table and banging every table".

    Directing his comments at those he calls Thatcher's "heir and disciples" on the bench in front of him he says Thatcher would not be "glorying in standing aside".

    Lord Kerr (standing) speaking to the 'heirs to thatcher' on the bench in front (l-r) Lord Forsyth, Lord Lamont and Lord LAwson
    Image caption: Lord Kerr (standing) speaking to the 'heirs to Thatcher' on the bench in front (l-r) Lord Forsyth, Lord Lamont and Lord LAwson
  8. 'If we look for allies we will find them

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Oates says he "does not recognise the European Union that some noble lords describe where apparently we have no friends, win no votes and have no influence".

    "I thought it was Britain that led the way in creating the single market, securing the former members of the Eastern Bloc, opposing Putin, securing a united approach to Iran and pushing a free trade agenda" he says.

    He admits the EU needs reform but says "if we would for once drop the grumpy old man act and look for allies we will find them".

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Oates
  9. EU has 'no democratic answers'

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour peer Lord Howarth of Newport argues the UK has "never been at home in the political structures of the European Union" and still "does not fit in".

    If the other members of the EU "proceed towards increased union we will be marginalised, if they do not the EU will remain an economic disaster zone" he tells peers.

    The EU is also is "palpably failing to deal with challenge of the migration crisis" leading to "grievous human consequence and is setting alight to dangerous nationalism" Lord Howarth says.

    And the biggest problem with the EU, Lord Howarth says, is that is has "no democratic solutions" to the failures he highlights.

    "No one knows if we''ll be a little bit richer or a little bit poorer if we're in our out of the EU" he adds.

    Lord Howarth of Newport
  10. Cameron 'like a conjuror with no rabbit'

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    UKIP peer Lord Willoughby de Broke says that "after all the trouble, all the grim hours of all-night negotiations" that the Prime Minister went through during negotiations David Cameron returned with "not one power returned not one line in the treaty altered".

    Lord Willoughby de Broke argues that Mr Cameron is "like a conjurer who's gone to the party with his hat but forgotten the rabbit".

    "He hasn't even produced the most myxomatosed rabbit out of his hat" Lord Willoughby de Broke complains.

    "It's time to leave it is time to run our own country again" he concludes.

    Lord Willoughby de Broke
  11. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons has adjourned for the day. It will sit again at 9:30am tomorrow morning for culture, media and sport questions. 

    These will be followed by the weekly business statement, which sets out the future business of the House. 

    The main business will be two backbench business debates, the first on gangs and serious youth violence and the second on Welsh affairs.

    There will also be a short debate on diabetes care.

  12. Debate is not what the used to be

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Conservative peer the Earl of Caithness recounts that he was in the House of Lords during the 1975 debate around joining the European Economic Community - the precursor to the European Union. 

    Lord Caithness tells peers he was greatly "influenced by high quality of the debates then" but complains he has "not been influenced to the same extent" by today's debates. 

    Conservative peer the Earl of Caithness
  13. Minister says sentencing is already flexible

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Dominic Raab

    Home Office Minister Dominic Raab says that some people treat their pets "better than family" and adds that there is a "growing trend" of dog thefts.

    He says he is "wary" of creating new offences where the law already covers something.

    He argues that current sentencing guidelines allow the emotional impact of a theft to be taken into account.

  14. Sentencing in cases of dog theft

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Gareth Johnson

    Conservative MP Gareth Johnson is introduce a short debate on the theft of dogs.

    He says the "emotional impact" of this crime is worse than the financial loss, and calls for sentencing guidelines to take this into account.

    He adds that having a dog stolen is like losing "a quasi member of your own family".

  15. MPs approve FCO estimate

    Estimates

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have approve the estimate of the Foreign Office budget by 305 to 55 - a majority of 250

  16. 'Euroscepticism is why I left the Conservatives'

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Lee of Trafford tells peers the Conservative Party's "eurosceptic position" is why he left the party in 1997.

    Quoting from his resignation letter he says "it's not I who changed my belief and approach it is the Conservative Party that has changed".

    Lord Lee, who was Conservative MP from 1983 to 1992, says he is thankful the upcoming referendum will have a "much wider electoral base than the Conservative Party" as leaving the EU "would be taking the great out of Great Britain".

    Liberal Democrat peer Lord Lee of Trafford
  17. Division

    Estimates

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have divided of the supplementary estimate for the Foreign Office budget the year ending with 31 March 2016.

    The result is expected at 7 48pm.

  18. Division result

    Welfare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have rejected the second set of Lords amendment by 309 to 275 - a majority of 34.

  19. Division

    Welfare Bill

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    MPs have divided on whether to accept a second group of Lords amendments to the Welfare Bill.

    These amendments would require an impact assessment of the Bill to be made before it became law.

    The result of the division is expected at 7:35pm.

  20. Stevens: Scare stories hide Government's failure

    EU referendum debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    UKIP peer Lord Stevens of Ludgate argues that "the government's scare stories are an attempt to justify their failure to achieve real reform of the EU".

    He tells peers that similar stories were circulated in Norway around the time of their 1994 referendum to join the EU. Norway voted to remain outside the EU and today "is trading more than ever with EU countries and unemployment is much lower than most EU countries".

    "If leaving is going to be such an unmitigated disaster why did they run the risk the UK might vote to leave," he adds.

    "Leaving is the safe option."

    UKIP peer Lord Stevens of Ludgate