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Summary

  1. MPs on the Public Accounts Committee conducted an investigation into corporate tax deals, questioning representatives from Google and HMRC.
  2. Energy and Climate Change questions was followed by an urgent question on short money.
  3. MPs listened to the Leader of the House's Business statement, then there was a statement from Health Secretary Jeremy Hunt on the junior doctors' contract.
  4. Peers met at 11am for questions, followed by second reading of the Armed Forces Bill.
  5. MPs also debated justice for Equitable Life policy-holders and the conservation of sea bass.

Live Reporting

By Kate Whannel, Alex Partridge and Ros Ball

All times stated are UK

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  1. MPs adjourn

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The debate comes to an end and that concludes the day's business in the Commons.

    MPs will be away next week but return on Monday 22 February.

    House of Commons
  2. Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Woodcock

    Labour MP John Woodcock rises to open the debate on police handling of the Poppi Worthington case.

    Before he begins Deputy Speaker Eleanor Laing asks MPs to be careful of what they say as the coroner has decided that an inquest should be resumed and that therefore the subject is sub judice.

    John Woodcock says the case must lead to changes in the way the police and social services operate.

    Home Office Minister Karen Bradley agrees saying that any failing in police response must be identified but says she cannot make any detailed comments on the particular case.

  3. House of Lords adjourns

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour withdraws its regret motion and the recall of MPs regulations receive the approval of the House.

    And that's it for the day. Peers will return on Monday 22 February, after the half term break.

    End of the day in the House of Lords
  4. Intimidation 'a criminal offence'

    Recall of MPs regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Addressing one of the main points raised in the debate, Lord Bridges of Headley says that the laws that cover elections also cover recalls, and that "anyone intimidating signers would be committing a criminal offence". 

    He says the regulations and the act are meant to "go some way to restoring the public's faith in our elected representatives".

  5. Government has made 'steps in the right direction'

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Rory Stewart tells MPs that the UK needs a healthy bass stock and believes that government measures are "steps in the right direction".

    He believes the government has made important strides by agreeing an EU wide "maximum sustainable yield". He also lauds the government's work on tackling drift netting and pair trawlers

  6. 'Misshapen monster'

    Recall of MPs regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Lord Lipsey points out that there is a clause in the Recall of MPs Act about "illegal canvassing by police officers". 

    "I admire the brain that thought that should be within the bill," he says.

    He calls it a "misshapen monster". 

  7. A 'good humoured and good looking' debate

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Minister Rory Stewart confesses to being out of his comfort zone partly because he is not the Fishing Minister and partly because his constituency sits atop a mountain.

    He tells MPs he has been pleasantly surprise not only by the good humour of the debate but also by the good looks noting the number of energetic and tanned men who have contributed.

    "Angling is clearly a sport that creates a stress-free life," he says.

    Rory Stewart
  8. Government 'caving in'

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Shadow Environment, Food and Rural Affairs Kerry McCarthy accuses the government of caving in to demand from the commercial fishing lobby.

    She says that bass stocks are in decline not because of recreational angling but commercial fishing.

    She calls for further action at an EU level and more work at the national level to tackle illegal unregulated landings and the "black fish" market.

    Kerry McCarthy
  9. 'Insane to criminalise recreational anglers'

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Antoinette Sandbach tells MPs that her Cheshire constituency is not famous for its fishing communities - "largely because it has none".

    However she says it does have many keen recreational anglers and argues that it is insane to criminalise such people for removing a few fish.

    "This is the kind of policy-making that discredits the whole of the European Union."

    However she believes the answer is not simply "leave the EU", pointing out that there are many treaties between EU and non-EU countries which regulate fisheries.

    Antoinette Sandbach
  10. Labour concerns about recall secrecy

    Recall of MPs regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Labour's Baroness Hayter of Kentish Town has tabled a regret motion criticising the regulations. She says making 176 pages of new regulations is "not the correct use of a statutory instrument".

    She says that the opposition are concerned about the potential lack of secrecy surrounding a recall petition effort. Constituents would be able to go to sign a recall petition at a number of places in a constituency, but she says that there is no safeguard in either the bill or the regulations to stop someone being observed or photographed going in or out of the location. She says this could lead to intimidation.

    She says that although her party supports recall, the original legislation was "hastily drafted and ill-thought out" and such a lengthy statutory instrument "makes proper scrutiny impossible".

    Baroness Hayter
  11. Europe issue 'a red herring'

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour MP Huw Irranca-Davies says the Europe issue is a red herring.

    He argues that even if the UK wasn't in the EU the government would still need to put in conservation methods that balance conservation with fisheries.

    Huw Irranca-Davies
  12. Recall of MPs regulations

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Lord Bridges of Headley is introducing an approval motion for new regulations relating to the Recall of MPs Act 2015.

    The Recall of MPs Act 2015 allows MPs to be subject to a recall petition if they have been jailed or suspended from the House of Commons for an extended period of time. 

    If 10% of voters in a constituency sign the petition, it would trigger a by-election.

  13. 'What a load of rubbish'

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Sheryll Murray notes that the European Commission estimate that anglers take 25% of total stock cost of sea bass.

    Conservative Charles Walker tells MPs that "only in the strange world of the EU" could a few thousand people with fishing rods account for 25% of all sea bass taken.

    "What a load of rubbish," he says.

    Charles Walker
  14. Government 'very concerned' about prosecutions

    Armed Forces Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Earl Howe is summing up the debate for the government. On the subject of human rights prosecutions of soldiers, he says the government is "very concerned". He says the Conservative Party promised to address the issue in their manifesto and "we're determined to honour that".

    He says judgments have left the legal position of events on the battlefield unclear, but the government continues to defend the concept of combat immunity "vigorously".

    He says the government is working on proposals and considering legislating, and will report on the issue in due course.

    Earl Howe
  15. 'Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear'

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Madeline Moon opens her speech reprising her tweet from earlier in the week: "Oh dear, Oh dear, Oh dear - what is government doing?"

    She understands that MPs may wonder what she is doing "out of my darkened room" and in the debate: "It has nothing do with defence, I don't eat fish, I am not an angler."

    However she tells MPs that 40 years spent living with an ecologist means she can spot "an environmental disaster" when she sees one.

    She argues that recreational angling represents a sustainable future for sea bass and should not be banned.

    Madeleine Moon
  16. Jon Cruddas: Recreational anglers unfairly targeted

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour's Jon Cruddas notes that MPs haven't debated recreational fishing since 2014. 

    He argues that the restrictions unfairly target recreational anglers.

    He points out that anglers fishing from April to June have to return what they catch but a commercial boat can come along immediately after and catch the same fish.

    Jon Cruddas
  17. Rare bill with strong cross-party support

    Armed Forces Bill

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Summing up for Labour, Lord Toughig says it is rare that a piece of legislation receives such strong cross-party support. He says nonetheless it has been scrutinised to make sure the armed forces get the best possible deal.

    Lord Touhig says when he was a defence minister he had a mission statement: "We will value our service men and women and their families and do everything practical in our power to demonstrate that." 

    He says he is sure that by working together across the House they will show the British armed forces that they are on their side.

    Lord Touhig
  18. Cod and the EU

    Sea bass debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Scott Mann

    Conservative Scott Mann argues that the government should be fighting EU changes and "reclaiming our territorial waters".

    Labour's Huw Irranca-Davies intervenes to say that EU legislation has meant that depleted cod supplies have now been replenished.

    Conservative Antoinette Sandbach argues that the decline in cod was caused by the EU's "discredited common fisheries policy".

    Melanie Onn joins in to make the point that depletion in stock was a result of advancement in trawler technology.