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Summary

  1. MPs meet at 9.30am for questions to the Environment ministerial teams; followed by an urgent question on the website Return of Kings.
  2. Following the Business statement, there was a statement on a select committee report on Kids Company.
  3. Two backbench debates followed: on parliamentary sovereignty and EU renegotiations; then on the conflict in Yemen.
  4. The House of Lords mets at 11.30am for oral questions. Peers spent the day in debates on a number of reports.

Live Reporting

By Alex Partridge, Kate Whannel and Sam Francis

All times stated are UK

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  1. Commons adjourns

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    The Commons has adjourned for the day.

    MPs return tomorrow from 9:30am for a day of debates on private member's bills, starting with Conservative Mike Wood's Riot Compensation Bill.

  2. UK has 'most generous' rail compensation system

    Adjournment debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Claire Perry

    Transport Minister Claire Perry says she's "always keen to talk about the railways" and keen to tell the House what is being done to improve them.

    She says "sometimes it doesn't feel like it", but the Delay Repay scheme is "one of the most generous" compensation schemes in Europe. Tom Brake intervenes to suggest that it is one of the most generous schemes in Europe because so few passengers know about it. According to Passenger Focus just 12% of passengers claim for delays.

    She says automatic compensation is being introduced for passengers who buy tickets online because "people don't have time to faff around" claiming for delays, and she'd like to see it rolled out further.

  3. Adjournment debate on rail services

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Lib Dem MP for Carshalton and Wallington Tom Brake is leading an adjournment debate on the Delay Repay scheme for rail passengers. 

    On Southern Railway, the company Tom Brake is complaining about, passengers can claim if their train is more than 30 minutes late. But he says it is not advertised well enough, and that how to claim is a source of confusion, even for rail staff.

    He says that on Southern in 2010/11, 2,000 trains were delayed per month, while now now it's 8,000 delayed per month. He says the company offers a "shambolic" service.

    Southern runs commuter rail services from London Victoria and London Bridge to South London and Sussex

    Southern and Gatwick Express trains approaching Victoria Station, London
  4. Government takes Yemen 'very seriously'

    Yemen debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Tobias Ellwood

    Foreign Office Minister Tobias Ellwood acknowledges that "more needs to be done by the international community in Yemen" because of the "scale of the humanitarian catastrophe" there.

    He says the government takes Yemen "very seriously indeed" and that he personally has "spent a lot of time" on the issue.

    The SNP's Kirsten Oswald, who led the debate, says she hopes the government "considers" the SNP's position on arms sales to Saudi Arabia and training of Saudi troops. 

  5. Both sides can 'do considerably more'

    Yemen debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Labour shadow foreign minister Fabian Hamilton says Labour recognises the legitimacy of President Hadi, but says it's "clear both sides should be doing considerably more to reduce the humanitarian cost".

    He says peace talks are the only way to bring an end to the conflict.

    On Saudi Arabia, he says that while claims of war crimes committed in the conflict are investigated, UK arms sales to the country must be suspended. He says the UK can play an "important and vital role" in securing peace in Yemen.

    Fabian Hamilton
  6. 'Serious questions' for UK government

    Yemen debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Patrick Grady winds up the debate for the SNP. He focuses again on the export of UK weapons. 

    He says the UK is in breach of international criteria on arms exports and that "serious questions" are being asked of the UK government both on weapons and on their humanitarian response, and he hopes the minister will answer them.

  7. Saudis 'defending own interests' in Yemen

    Yemen debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative member for Tonbridge and Malling Tom Tugendhat says Saudi involvement in the Yemen conflict is understandable given the deep links between the two countries and that we "should recognise that they are defending their own interests". 

    But he says he "will not argue that they are doing so in a humane way" and urges the Saudis to remember that "civilians are not a target" and "think very hard" about the lives of those they are affecting. 

    Tom Tugendhat
  8. 'Grave violations' in Yemen

    Yemen debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Conservative Wendy Morton says more than 80% of the Yemeni population are in need of humanitarian aid. She also says there have been "grave violations" of humanitarian law.

    But she says that when criticising the Saudi-led coalition it is "important to remember" that the intervention was requested by the "legitimate President" of the country.

  9. End of debate

    Preventing Violence against women

    Westminster Hall

    And with that, the debate in Westminster Hall concludes.

  10. New stalking order

    Preventing violence against women

    Westminster Hall

    Home Office Minister Karen Bradley tells MPs the government is currently consulting on a new "stalking protection order" to try to discourage stalking problem behaviour before it becomes criminal.

    Under the new order "positive requirements can be placed on a perpetrators" such as attending mental health sessions, allowing police to intervene at an earlier stage.

  11. 'Unacceptably high' levels of violence

    Preventing violence against women

    Westminster Hall

    Minister for Preventing Abuse, Exploitation and Crime, Karen Bradley, tells MPs there has been a "general downward trend" in sexual assaults and domestic abuse since figures were first collected in 2004-5.

    Last year "8.2% of women were victim of any domestic abuse, the lowest estimate since the questions were first asked [in the national crime survey]".

    Successful prosecutions for domestic abuse have also increased "from just over 30,000 in 2004/5 to over 90,000 in 2014/15", she tells MPs.

    "But 1.4m is still unacceptably high and we all need to do more to prevent these crimes and the role of men is critical," she adds.

    Minister for Preventing Abuse, Exploitation and Crime Karen Bradley
  12. Yemen faces 'catastrophe'

    Yemen debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Keith Vaz tells the chamber he is "a Yemani by birth", he was born in Aden, and says one of his fondest memories as a child is watching boats heading for the Suez Canal.

    He says "those wonderful memories" have gone and Yemen faces "a catastrophe".

    He says the "whole House is united" in their view on Yemen, as have recent governments. He says the government must support a ceasefire, help the UN and ensure dialogue "with all sides". He also calls for greater involvement for Yemen's neighbour Oman, which he says is "peaceful as can be".

    Keith Vaz
  13. Good bye from the Lords

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    And that brings an end to today's debates in the House of Lords. 

    Peers will be back on Monday 8 February to debate committee stage of the Trade Union Bill.

    Stay with as the House of Commons continue its backbench business debate on the conflict in Yemen.

  14. Government response to the debate

    Capital markets union

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate for the government, Treasury Spokesman, Earl of Courtown, thanks the House of Lords for their feedback and says it will be considered.

    The processes of establishing the Capital Market Union (CMU) is an ongoing process, he tells peers.

    Summing up his speech, the Earl says argues the process for establishing the CMU should not be hindered though, as the resulting freeing up investment across Europe could have "huge benefits" for the UK.

    Treasury Spokesman, Earl of Courtown,
  15. Yemen debate begins

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    An airstrike in Sana'a, Yemen
    Image caption: Aftermath of an airstrike in Sana'a, Yemen

    The SNP's Kirsten Oswald is leading a backbench debate on the conflict in Yemen.

    The main conflict in the country is between forces loyal to President Hadi, backed by a Saudi Arabia-led coalition of Arab nations, and Houthi rebels. Groups loyal to the self-styled Islamic State and Al-Qaeda also operate in the country.

    Yesterday the International Development Committee urged the UK to stop licencing arms exports to Saudi Arabia, given the "overwhelming" evidence that the Saudi-led coalition has committed war crimes. The committee says that £3bn of export licences have been granted for weapons to Saudi Arabia in the last six months.

  16. Labour response on debate

    Capital Markets Union

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Responding to the debate for Labour, shadow economic spokesman Lord Davies of Oldham, calls on the minster to reply to all the findings by the European Union Committee.

    But he highlights one that he believes is especially damaging to the UK.

    He tells peers that the "success of the American economy is partly because 80% is finance is raised in capital markets and only 20% in banks, which almost the opposite as far as the UK is involved" and that the UK needs rebalancing. 

    Lord Davies of Oldham
  17. Division called...and then called off

    Parliamentary Sovereignty debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    John Baron attempted to put his motion to a division. The motion states that the House "believes in the importance of Parliamentary sovereignty" and calls for the government to negotiate to allow Parliament to stop any unwanted legislation.

    But the tellers for yes, John Baron and his colleague Julian Lewis, weren't in place quickly enough so the division is called off, and the 'noes' win.

    "Dear oh dear," says Speaker John Bercow.

    John Baron and Julian Lewis
    Image caption: John Baron and Julian Lewis don't make it to the bench in time to be appointed tellers, and the division is off
  18. The city 'central' to the CMU project

    Capital Markets Union debate

    House of Lords

    Parliament

    Liberal Democrat Baroness Bowles of Berkhamsted welcomes a change in culture and believes the future looks brighter for a CMU.

    She acknowledges that concerns had once been raised that a CMU could become a rival to the City and London.

    She tells peers that this suggestion was jumped on very quickly and "common sense broke out all around" when reassurances were given that the UK and the city is central to and a major asset to the CMU project. 

    Baroness Bowles of Berkhamsted
  19. Government wants to be in a 'reformed EU'

    Parliamentary Sovereignty debate

    House of Commons

    Parliament

    Europe Minister David Lidington says if we were creating the EU from scratch he probably wouldn't design it as it is but "we are where we are".

    He says "outside the EU we would have the theoretical right to negotiate free-trade deals on our own behalf" but says the EU has much bigger leverage with its 500 million people than the UK does alone. 

    He says the "reality" is that the WTO and other groups are directed by blocks of countries and very large countries like China and the United States. He says the interests of the British people are better served not by a "nameplate on the table" but by shaping the direction of the world's biggest trading block.

    He says the government wants to be in a reformed EU, in the single market and "playing a leading role" but out of the Euro, any future European Army and the Schengen agreement. He says the PM is doing everything he can to "secure that future".

    David Lidington